After graduating from Bowdoin College in 1992, Rosa Scarcelli went to work for her family’s housing management business, in part because jobs were scarce.

Scarcelli, one of four Democratic candidates for governor, says she is disappointed that not much has changed in 18 years.

Job growth must be a top priority for the state’s next governor, Scarcelli told MaineToday Media’s editorial board on Tuesday.

“I am pro-business. I’m a Democrat who believes in Democratic values, but I’m very interested in seeing Maine grow,” Scarcelli said. “Without an economic engine, we can’t do all the things that we believe in.”

Scarcelli wants the state to streamline regulations for existing businesses and companies that are considering investments in Maine. She supports lowering the income tax and making broader reforms to the tax code.

Scarcelli also said the state’s Department of Economic and Community Development isn’t effective, and should be reorganized. The state should promote a variety of energy sources — including wind, hydroelectric and natural gas — in an effort to bring Maine’s energy costs in line with national averages, she said.

Scarcelli, 40, is a Wilton native who lives in Portland. She has never held political office, but she was George Mitchell’s first Senate page, in 1987, and later worked as an intern in his office.

She is president and CEO of Stanford Management. The company’s portfolio consists of more than 2,000 affordable-housing units in Maine, Pennsylvania, Mississippi and Connecticut.

“People don’t have faith that their government is using their money wisely. We need to restore that faith,” she said.

Scarcelli has positioned herself as the most fiscally conservative candidate in the Democratic field, and someone who will be able to work across the aisle.

She said she is prepared to make decisions that might be unpopular, but which she believes are necessary, such as increasing the student-to-teacher ratio in public schools and reforming the way Maine provides special education services.

Scarcelli also clarified her position on casino gaming. She said she would veto any legislation authorizing a casino, but would respect decisions made by citizens in statewide referendums.