SAQQARA, Egypt – Egyptian archaeologists on Thursday unveiled a newly unearthed double tomb with vivid wall paintings in the ancient necropolis of Saqqara near Cairo, saying it could be the start of uncovering a vast cemetery in the area.

The tomb includes two false doors with colorful paintings depicting the two people buried there, a father and a son who served as heads of the royal scribes, said Abdel-Hakim Karar, a top archaeologist.

“The colors of the false door are fresh as if it was painted yesterday,” Karar told reporters.

Humidity had destroyed the sarcophagus of the father, Shendwas, while the tomb of the son, Khonsu, was robbed in antiquity, he said.

Egypt’s antiquities chief, Zahi Hawass, said they were “the most distinguished tombs ever found from the Old Kingdom,” because of their “amazing colors.”