The beauty of Maine fishing is that something good is always going on somewhere. Sometimes you’ve got to travel for it; other times, it’s closer than you think.

REGION A: SOUTHERN MAINE

The dog days of summer have slowed the fishing for sure, but there are still some big fish being caught.

Biologist Francis Brautigam with the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife said there was a report of an 11-pound, 1-ounce largemouth bass caught in Acton’s Mousam Lake, and the biologists had a big catch of their own.

While netting in Shag Pond in Woodstock, they caught a 10-pound, 1-ounce splake.

REGION B: CENTRAL MAINE

In some areas of central Maine, fishermen are hammering smallmouth bass.

“There are three to four folks who are bass fishing really well. I don’t want to give too many names, but Webber Pond in Vassalboro is fishing well,” said IFW biologist Robert Van-Riper.

REGION C: DOWN EAST

Schooled-up white perch and smallmouth bass are the best fish to target right now in Washington and Hancock counties.

IFW biologist Greg Bur suggests trying the usual places for smallies, around rocks, dropoffs, deep pockets and lily pads. And for pickerel, he said to target around weeds.

Those intent on pursuing trout should fish in wider streams and take a thermometer to find the waters that are colder than 68 degrees, Bur said.

REGION D: WESTERN MAINE

Water in streams is very low in the Rangeley Lakes region and anglers are doing best in the big lakes, said IFW biologist Dave Boucher.

“We’re seeing scores of boats out on the weekends in particular. Of course, they’re deep trolling. There is still some fishing around,” Boucher said.

REGION E: MOOSEHEAD LAKE

Most streams in the Moosehead region are at their lowest levels of the season and trout are retreating to spring holes, said IFW biologist Tim Obrey.

“Trout are easily stressed when the water is low and warm. This makes them less likely to bite and, if caught, more susceptible to hooking mortality,” he said.

He reminds anglers to “burp” fish brought up from deep water to relieve the pressure in the air bladder so the fish can readily swim away when released.

REGION F: EASTERN MAINE

A new boat launch at Cold Stream Pond in Lincoln has enabled boaters and paddlers to get on the pond.

It came about by creative and generous means when Joe Brown of Lincoln bought the plot of land before it was lost to an outside sale, said IFW biologist Nels Kramer.

Then Brown sold it to IFW for the same price, Kramer said.

“It has been 20-some years in the making,” Kramer said. “People can now launch a boat, canoe or kayak. It’s a beautiful facility.”

REGION G: NORTHERN MAINE

Biologists in northern Maine ask fishermen to go fish for trout in Upper Hudson Pond in Township 11, Range 10 WELS.

There are too many trout under 12 inches. So there is now a special regulation allowing for a five trout limit on trout between 6 and 12 inches.

IFW biologist Dave Basley said thinning out some of those fish will improve the growth rate of brook trout.

 

Staff Writer Deirdre Fleming can be contacted at 791-6452 or at:

[email protected]