KENNEBUNK — Police had been called previously to the home of a 39-year-old woman who was fatally shot Sunday by an officer responding to a report of a domestic dispute.

Kennebunk police had gone to the condominium at 16 Nottingham Court, the home of Katherine Paulson, a “handful” of times before Sunday on medical calls, Lt. Anthony J. Bean Burpee said Monday. He did not identify the other person who lived at the condominium with Paulson, but neighbors said it was her mother.

Both residents had medical issues, Bean Burpee said, but he could not say what they were or provide details or dates of earlier police visits.

Paulson was killed Sunday night by Officer Joshua Morneau after she confronted him with a weapon, according to police. Details such as the type of weapon and the nature of the domestic dispute were not released, but Bean Burpee said it was not simply her fists.

Morneau, who has been a Kennebunk police officer since October 2005, and Sgt. Juliet Gilman went to the home about 9 p.m. and were invited in by the resident who had called police, Bean Burpee said.

The confrontation and shooting happened shortly after the officers arrived, according to a news release.

“We try to mediate these situations, and they can get beyond anybody’s control,” Bean Burpee said.

The state Attorney General’s Office is investigating to determine whether the shooting was justified, as it does in all cases involving police use of deadly force. Martha Demeritt, spokeswoman for the office, said Monday that it wasn’t clear when the report would be completed.

Police have not released the identity of the person who called them to 16 Nottingham Court. Property records indicate that Carol Paulson bought the condominium in April 2009. No one answered the door Monday, and there is no phone listing for either woman.

Nottingham Court was quiet Monday. The neighborhood of tidy condominium “fourplexes” is part of Coventry Woods, a subdivision off Cat Mousam Road. There were no signs of what had happened the night before.

One resident, Alan Giancola, said he didn’t know about the shooting until a neighbor called. In hindsight, he thought he must have heard Morneau’s gun being fired.

“I heard a bang around 9 o’clock. I thought it was my wife in the kitchen doing something with pots and pans,” he said.

Giancola said he never saw any indication of disturbances at Paulson’s home. “They were quiet people, stayed to themselves,” he said.

Jim Ferrick, who lives across the street, agreed. “They never bothered a soul,” he said.

Ferrick said it was strange to see so many police in the neighborhood Sunday night. He noticed that no one was being taken away in an ambulance that arrived at the scene, then he saw camera flashes in the home.

“As time went on I said, ‘Something bad’s happening here,’ ” Ferrick said.

Bean Burpee, who has worked for the police department for 13 years, said it was the only shooting he could remember that involved a Kennebunk officer.

“It’s difficult for everybody. Certainly, our heart goes out to the family,” he said.

After word of the shooting spread in the department, some officers came to the police station to show their support for Morneau and Gilman, Bean Burpee said. The department has 20 full-time officers.

Morneau and Gilman were both on leave Monday. Morneau is on administrative leave pending the outcome of the investigation by the Attorney General’s Office. Gilman is on leave while being questioned by the Attorney General’s Office, Bean Burpee said.

Both are represented through the Maine Police Association, their union. Calls to the union’s executive director, Paul Gaspar, were not immediately returned.

Kennebunk police plan their own investigation to determine whether the department’s policies and procedures were followed.

Staff Writer Ann S. Kim can be contacted at 791-6383 or at: [email protected]