NEW YORK – A published report says Apple Inc. uses subsidiaries in Ireland, the Netherlands and other low-tax nations as part of a strategy that enables the technology giant to cut its global tax bill by billions of dollars every year.

The New York Times on Sunday outlined legal methods used by Cupertino, Calif.-based Apple to avoid paying billions of dollars in federal and state taxes.

One approach highlighted in the report: Even though the company is based in California, Apple has set up a small office in Reno, Nev., to collect and invest its profits. The corporate tax rate in Nevada is zero. In California, it’s 8.84 percent.

While many major corporations try to reduce their tax bills, technology companies like Apple, Google Inc., Microsoft Corp. and others have more options to do so.

That’s because some of their revenue comes from digital products or royalties on patents, making it easier for them to move profits to tax-friendly states or countries, the Times said.

In contrast, it’s tougher to shift the collection of profits from the sale of a physical product to a tax-friendly haven.

The 71 technology companies in the S&P 500, including Apple, reported paying global cash taxes over the past two years at a rate that’s, on average, one-third less than other S&P 500 companies, the Times said.