Country music legend Loretta Lynn is three years older than she has led people to believe, an age change that undermines the story she told of being married at 13 in “Coal Miner’s Daughter,” documents obtained by The Associated Press show.

Lynn’s birth certificate on file at the state Office of Vital Statistics in Frankfort, Ky., shows that Loretta Webb was born on April 14, 1932, in Johnson County, Kentucky. That makes her 80 years old, not 77. Also on file is her marriage license and two affidavits from her mother, Clara Marie Ramey, and S.W. Ward Jr., who was not related to the family, listing the same birthdate.

The records weren’t filed until 1965, which meant that Lynn needed multiple documents to prove her age at that time. Lynn’s signature appears on the document as Loretta Webb Lynn.

Melvin Webb lists his daughter “Loretta” as 7 years old for the 1940 Census, according to a digital copy on file at the Kentucky Historical Society. Lynn’s marriage license, obtained by the AP from the Johnson County clerk’s office, lists her as 15 on Jan. 10, 1948.

In “Coal Miner’s Daughter,” the autobiography that became an Academy Award-winning film, Lynn told a different story — that she was married at 13 and was a mother of four by 18. Most books and public references to Lynn list her current age as 77.

When contacted by the AP, Lynn’s spokeswoman, Nancy Russell of Nashville, Tenn., declined comment.

Certainly Lynn isn’t the first celebrity of a certain age to be less than forthcoming about a birthday, but the discrepancy is significant because age isn’t just a number for the Country Music Hall of Fame member. It is woven into her compelling life story, made famous in her 1976 bestselling autobiography, “Coal Miner’s Daughter,” and the subsequent film starring Sissy Spacek. The movie made $67 million nationwide and was nominated for seven Oscars; Spacek won for her portrayal of Lynn.

The Grammy-winning singer recently announced that it will become a Broadway musical, starring Zooey Deschanel.

It would have been illegal for a girl under 14 to marry in Kentucky in 1948, said R. Eric Henninger of the Kentucky State Law Library.

Penn puts focus back on Haiti at Cannes festival

Sean Penn tried to turn the conversation at the Cannes Film Festival to Haiti, hosting a fundraiser for the earthquake-ravaged and poverty-stricken country.

It was the first time the festival has used its spotlight to attract attention for a cause not connected with a movie.

Penn, director Paul Haggis and model Petra Nemcova brought their individual charities together for a black-tie dinner Friday evening to benefit their organizations and renew attention to Haiti. Designer Giorgio Armani co-hosted.

“A film festival is not simply about films, ever,” Penn said. “This isn’t a film, what we’re doing now … What it all has to do with is an expression and a shared experience.”

Clinton, Peas settle lawsuit, canceling trial

George Clinton and the Black Eyed Peas have settled a lawsuit in which the funk pioneer accused the pop group of using his music without proper permission.

The settlement was reached after mediation and was reported to a federal judge on Monday, records show. The judge has canceled an upcoming trial as attorneys work to finalize settlement documents, and no further details were provided.

Clinton sued the Peas in December 2010, claiming the group used elements of his 1979 song “(Not Just) Knee Deep” in remixes of their international hit “Shut Up.” The song first appeared on the group’s 2003 album “Elephunk,” and it released “Shut Up Remix” the same year. It also was used in another remix included on the deluxe edition of the Peas’ 2009 release, “The E.N.D.,” according to Clinton’s lawsuit.

A judge limited the damages Clinton could recoup in a ruling earlier this month, stating the musician hadn’t shown how much he lost or how much the Peas and Universal profited from using Clinton’s music.

– From news service reports