KANSAS CITY, Mo. – Kansas City Chiefs linebacker Jovan Belcher, a former University of Maine player, was apparently worried he would lose his baby and money to his longtime girlfriend before fatally shooting her and killing himself, according to newly released police reports.

Belcher also complained about Kasandra Perkins, the mother of the couple’s 3-month-old daughter, in conversations and text messages sent to a woman he was dating on the side.

In one text message sent in late October or early November, Belcher wrote he “would shoot” Perkins “if she didn’t leave him alone.”

The girlfriend told police that Belcher said “his child’s mother threatened to take all his money and his child if they split up” and “knew exactly how to press his buttons and make him angry.”

Belcher shot Perkins multiple times in their home on Dec. 1 and then drove to team headquarters, where he killed himself in front of his coach and general manager.

The Jackson County prosecutor’s office reviewed the police reports, which first were obtained by The Kansas City Star, before closing the case Friday.

It formally ruled the deaths of Belcher, 25, and Perkins, 22, a murder-suicide, prosecutor’s office spokesman Mike Mansur said Tuesday.

Upon arriving at the home he shared with Perkins on Dec. 1, the couple began arguing over “one or both of them going out as in to a club or partying,” said Belcher’s mother, Cheryl Shepherd, who had moved in with them about two weeks earlier.

When Shepherd heard multiple gunshots, she ran to the bedroom and saw Belcher kneeling next to Perkins’ body, saying he was sorry.

After kissing Perkins, his baby daughter and his mother, Belcher drove to Arrowhead Stadium, breaking off his Bentley’s rear-view mirror on the way, the police report said.

Chiefs GM Scott Pioli saw Belcher holding a gun to his head and jumped out of his vehicle so he could find out what was happening.

“I’ve done a bad thing to my girlfriend already,” Belcher told Pioli, according to the report.

Belcher asked that Pioli and team owner Clark Hurt take care of his daughter.