NEW YORK – When Fall Out Boy learned that Elton John was a fan of their music, they jokingly thought he might want to record with them. As it turned out, he did.

“We were nearly done with the album,” lead singer Patrick Stump said in a recent interview. “I think we were mixing at that point, but he said ‘yes’ and we were like, ‘Oh, wow. OK, yes.”‘

The Chicago-based rockers halted the mixing process of their fifth album — their first in five years — and Stump flew to Atlanta to record with the veteran rocker.

John is featured on the title track of “Save Rock and Roll,” released last week. Band members say the title of the album is “tongue-in-cheek,” but they’re also serious about their choice of words.

“It hits on … ‘Why are we the only ones that are saying this?”‘ said frontman and bassist Pete Wentz. “But at the same time, it’s kind of a joke, but if it means something to you, then it’s not really that much of a joke.”

Stump said John’s inclusion on the title track really drives home their point.

“He actually spoke up for the album’s title. He came in and was like, ‘Love the album title. Love where this is going. This is great,”‘ Stump said. “And that was really special for us to have him support us like that.”

Just before the John-featured tune plays on the 11-track set, there’s the song “Rat a Tat,” featuring Courtney Love.

“We’ve had a couple different run-ins just over the years, you know, just ones where you’re like, ‘I had 17 drinks last night and I ran into Courtney Love,”‘ Wentz recalled with a laugh.

“It’s important for girls to understand that they don’t need to just be coat hangers for boys, it’s not all about being groupies,” he said. “So we thought it would be important to have an iconic female voice on the album, and Courtney screams rock ‘n’ roll.”

Fall Out Boy released their debut album in 2003. They are known for their alternative punk rock sound and Top 10 pop hits including “This Ain’t a Scene, It’s an Arms Race,” “Dance, Dance” and “Sugar, We’re Goin Down.”

Hearing rescheduled for ‘deeply embarrassed’ Witherspoon

ATLANTA – A court hearing on a disorderly conduct charge has been rescheduled for actress Reese Witherspoon, who said she is “deeply embarrassed” by what she said to a state trooper during a traffic stop in Atlanta.

Witherspoon’s case was scheduled for a Monday morning hearing, but it was reset for May 22. She was arrested Friday.

The Oscar-winning actress released a statement late Sunday apologizing for her behavior when her husband, Hollywood agent Jim Toth, was arrested and accused of driving under the influence of alcohol. The was in New York on Sunday night attending the premiere of her new movie “Mud.”

“Do you know my name?” Witherspoon is quoted as saying in a Georgia state trooper’s report of the early Friday incident. She also said: “You’re about to find out who I am” and “You’re about to be on national news,” according to the report.

Alzheimer’s slows Campbell

NASHVILLE, Tenn. – Glen Campbell’s Alzheimer’s disease has progressed too far to allow him to continue touring.

Instead, he’ll spend his 77th birthday on Monday in Washington as an advocate for Alzheimer’s research. The trip includes a fundraising dinner for the Alzheimer’s Association and a visit to Capitol Hill, where he’ll visit the Senate.

Alzheimer’s has robbed Campbell of many of his best memories, gained over a lifetime as an entertainment icon who was a pop star, a groundbreaking session musician, an actor and TV variety show host.

But it hasn’t taken everything.

Campbell will release a new album, “See You There,” on July 30. It’s a re-imagining of some of his most popular songs, recorded by Julian Raymond during the same sessions that produced Campbell’s last studio album of all new material, 2011’s “Ghost on the Canvas.”

The album offers new versions of his biggest hits like “Wichita Lineman,” “By the Time I Get to Phoenix,” “Rhinestone Cowboy” and “Hey Little One.”

In a brief interview, Campbell said of the songs: “Oh, they’re great. Those are great.”