SEATTLE – Amanda Knox says in an interview that what happened to her was “surreal but it could have happened to anyone.”

The Seattle native told ABC News’ Diane Sawyer in an interview airing Tuesday night that “I want the truth to come out. I’d like to be reconsidered as a person.”

In March, Italy’s highest criminal court overturned Knox’s acquittal in the 2007 murder of British student Meredith Kercher and ordered a new trial for Knox, 25. Italian law cannot compel Knox to return for the new legal proceeding.

Knox told Sawyer the high court’s decision was “incredibly painful” and she felt as if she had to crawl through another field of barbed wire after reaching what she thought was the end.

She said she was aware of being labeled a seductress, she-devil and other names in the media, but she said “they’re wrong.”

“I was in the courtroom when they were calling me a devil,” she told Sawyer in interview excerpts posted online. “It’s one thing to be called certain things in the media, and it’s another thing to be sitting in a courtroom fighting for your life while people are calling you a devil.

“For all intents and purposes I was a murderer, whether I was or not. I had to live with the idea that that would be my life,” she said during the interview.

Netherlands has a new monarch as queen abdicates

AMSTERDAM – Millions of Dutch people dressed in orange flocked to celebrations around the Netherlands Tuesday in honor of a once-in-a-generation milestone for the country’s ruling House of Orange-Nassau: after a 33-year reign, Queen Beatrix abdicated in favor of her eldest son, Willem-Alexander.

At 46, King Willem-Alexander is the youngest monarch in Europe and the first Dutch king in 123 years, since Willem III died in 1890. Like Beatrix before him, Willem-Alexander has assumed the throne at a time of social strains and economic malaise.

Although the Dutch monarchy is largely ceremonial, he immediately staked out a course to preserve its relevance in the 21st century, and “serve the public interest,” he said.