UNITED NATIONS — Brazil and Germany formally presented a resolution to the U.N. General Assembly on Thursday urging all countries to extend internationally guaranteed rights to privacy to the Internet and other electronic communications.

The draft resolution follows reports of U.S. eavesdropping on foreign leaders, including Brazil’s President Dilma Rousseff and German Chancellor Angela Merkel, that angered and dismayed U.S. allies. But it does not name the United States or any other nation as an offender.

General Assembly resolutions are not legally binding but they do reflect world opinion and carry moral and political weight.

Rousseff canceled a state visit to Washington after classified documents leaked by former National Security Agency analyst Edward Snowden showed that the NSA hacked the computer network of Brazil’s state-run oil company Petrobras and scooped up data on emails and telephone calls flowing through the country.

Merkel and other European leaders expressed anger recently after reports that the NSA allegedly monitored Merkel’s cell phone and swept up millions of French telephone records.