Last Sunday, my pastor preached about what it means to be “claimed by God” (as in Christian baptism). She told us it can pull you toward speaking the truth to power.

She quoted another preacher who said, “To be a Christian means you forfeit your right to apathy.”

As a Christian, a citizen and a veteran, I feel compelled to speak out about an issue our society seems to treat with increasing apathy: America’s use of torture against post-9/11 detainees.

For years, the (interfaith) National Religious Campaign Against Torture, on whose board I serve, has called for an investigation and public report on the use of “enhanced interrogation techniques.”

Now, at last, there is such a thoroughly documented report, compiled and approved by the U.S. Senate Intelligence Committee. Both Maine’s senators serve on this committee. Any day now, they will be asked to vote whether to release the report to the public.

Along with other Maine religious leaders, I have met with and written to Sens. Susan Collins and Angus King and their staffers repeatedly over the past year, urging them to vote to release the report. I am convinced that both are firmly opposed to torture, committed to responsible leadership and sensitive to the moral and historical dimensions of their decision.

Eleven years after Guantanamo opened, too many Americans get their version of recent history from Hollywood. Too many incorrectly believe torture is at least sometimes legal and/or effective.

Many people of faith pray constantly for reconciliation and for peace. I believe prayer is often answered by a growing inward forfeiture of apathy: a sense of how we must change and then act.

Releasing this report would be one step on the long road to a world free of torture.

Rev. Jill Job Saxby

board member, National Religious Campaign Against Torture

Cape Elizabeth