BIRMINGHAM, Ala. — “To Kill a Mockingbird” author Harper Lee has settled the federal lawsuit she filed against a museum in her south Alabama hometown over its sale of souvenirs featuring her name and the title of her book, court documents show.

An attorney for the Alabama native filed a motion Tuesday in federal court in Mobile saying Lee had reached an agreement with the Monroe County Heritage Museum in Monroeville.

The settlement notice came days after a judge refused to dismiss the lawsuit, filed last fall, that said the museum uses Lee’s name and the title of her Pulitzer Prize-winning novel without compensating her.

The document didn’t provide details on the settlement, and a lawyer for the museum declined to comment Wednesday.

An attorney for Lee didn’t immediately return a message seeking comment.

A judge would have to approve any settlement.

Lee, 87, has had a stroke and lives in Monroeville after years of splitting time between the town of 28,000 and New York.

Lee’s lone published novel, released in 1960, tells the story of small-town lawyer Atticus Finch, his two children and the struggle against racial prejudice and injustice in the Jim Crow South. Considered a modern classic, the book was turned into a movie starring Gregory Peck.

The set for the movie’s climactic courtroom scene re-created the Monroe County Courthouse, where the museum is located. The museum includes a gift shop that has sold book-related souvenirs including clothing.

The lawsuit said the museum took advantage of Lee’s trademarks to sell souvenirs and wrongly used the title of the book as a website address.