BOSTON

Transit police identify six involved in subway brawl

Transit police in Boston say they have identified six people allegedly involved in a brawl on a subway car last weekend that left three people requiring medical treatment.

A passenger shot video of the fight, which MBTA police have made public. MBA police said Wednesday afternoon no charges had been filed.

One young male victim was taken to a hospital for treatment and two teenage girls from Rhode Island were treated at the scene after the fight inside a Red Line train about 9 p.m. Sunday.

MBTA police Superintendent Joseph O’Connor said the male victim was involved in a verbal altercation with the group and the girls intervened to defend him.

Sixteen-year-old Nicole Geraldo of Lincoln, R.I., said she and some friends had gone to the Celtics game and the attack was unprovoked.

HARTFORD, Conn.

Judge Judy files lawsuit against Connecticut lawyer

Television’s Judge Judy has filed a lawsuit accusing a Connecticut personal-injury lawyer of using her image in advertisements without her permission.

The lawsuit filed Wednesday in U.S. District Court seeks more than $75,000 in damages from Hartford attorney John Haymond and his firm.

Haymond’s office said he was away on vacation and not immediately available to comment.

Judith Sheindlin said in a statement that she had never filed a lawsuit against anyone but the use of her image is “outrageous” and she feels it requires action.

The lawsuit says Haymond’s firm aired advertisements in Connecticut and Massachusetts that use footage from “Judge Judy” along with clips showing Haymond and his daughters.

Sheindlin is a retired Family Court judge and has been the star of “Judge Judy” for 18 years.

MONTPELIER, Vt.

Cat shot in face doing well after surgery, rescuers say

Vermont volunteers at the Felines & Friends Foundation say they rescued a cat that had been previously shot in the face.

The Caledonian Record reports that X-rays showed the cat had been shot point-blank and the bullet and shrapnel were in his head close to his spine.

Staff at The Animal Doctor in Newport Center, where the cat was brought, call him Salem.

Connie Knaggs, a worker at The Animal Doctor, says Salem “must have a strong will to live” if he could survive his injuries.

Thanks to the surgery at the clinic, Salem can chew his food and is on the mend until he can be medically cleared for a new home.

PROVIDENCE, R.I.

Health chief makes overdose antidote more accessible

Rhode Island’s health department director has taken emergency steps to address an overdose crisis by making an overdose antidote more widely available, including to law enforcement agencies.

The emergency regulations adopted this month say expanded access to naloxone, or Narcan, has become “immediately necessary to save lives.”

The regulations allow for naloxone to be prescribed not only to an individual experiencing an overdose or at risk of one, but to third parties including family members and friends. Police departments would be able to obtain and administer Narcan under a standing order from a prescriber.

Director Michael Fine wants all municipal police departments to carry Narcan. He said last month he was considering emergency regulations to help clear the way.

Rhode Island reported 55 overdose deaths through March 4.

Bill would free employees from having to ‘friend’ boss

Bosses would be forbidden from requiring employees to give them access to their Facebook, Twitter or other social media accounts under legislation pending in Rhode Island.

The bill would make it illegal for employers to require workers to add them as a social media contact, and would also prohibit them from demanding to see a worker’s social media page.

The legislation would also apply to college and university administrators, meaning that they could not require a student to show them their personal social media page.

The House Judiciary Committee is scheduled to vote on the bill Wednesday. Similar legislation is pending in the Senate.