Yu Darvish’s recent no-hit bid now officially ended in the seventh inning, not the ninth.

Major League Baseball overturned a disputed scoring decision from Friday night’s game between the Texas Rangers and Boston Red Sox. Acting on an appeal by Boston slugger David Ortiz, MLB changed an error in the seventh to a single on a high fly that dropped untouched between fielders.

Ortiz said Wednesday that he wouldn’t have appealed the play if it had been a no-hitter. Darvish had a perfect-game bid going until the ruling that attracted attention all across the majors.

With Darvish’s no-hit bid intact, Ortiz grounded a two-out single in the ninth inning.

“I complain about (it) because it was going to be a second hit, but that was going to be the only hit of the game, I wouldn’t bring it up,” Ortiz said.

The pitcher wasn’t concerned about the change.

“We won that game,” Darvish said through a translator. “Whether it was a one-hitter or two-hitter, we won the game. That’s something that happened in the past. The only thing I care about is the win.”

MLB confirmed the scoring change Wednesday. But as is routine on the numerous scoring appeals each week, the league didn’t provide an explanation for the reversal.

Veteran outfielder Alex Rios and 20-year-old second baseman Rougned Odor, playing his second major league game, both were in position to catch the pop-up in the seventh. Instead, Rios suddenly slowed and Odor made a late lunge. The ball fell to the ground untouched between them.

“Of course it was an error,” Texas Manager Ron Washington said. “It’s an error. It’s an out. It’s not a ball that somebody (dived) for and missed. That’s an out.”

Ortiz felt differently.

“It’s a play that everybody knows once they saw it,” he said. “The whole controversy started when they figured he was about to pitch a no-hitter.”

Official scorer Steve Weller, in his 20th season working MLB games, charged Rios with an error. While that ended a perfect game, Darvish’s no-hit bid was still intact.

Weller made a judgment call that Rios, with normal effort, could have made a routine catch.

Even Ortiz acknowledged that the ball should have been caught. Rios also didn’t dispute the error.

RAYS: Second baseman Ben Zobrist left Wednesday’s game after dislocating his left thumb in the fifth inning against Seattle.

White Sox: Chicago designated infielder Jeff Keppinger for assignment.

Keppinger had been out all season recovering from shoulder surgery last September.

METS: Pitcher Dillon Gee was placed on the 15-day disabled list with a strained back muscle.

CARDINALS: St. Louis recalled second baseman Kolten Wong from Triple-A Memphis after a four-hit, four-RBI game in the minors.

Less than two hours after the move was announced, Wong was sent home from Busch Stadium because of a stomach illness.

BRAVES: Atlanta released renderings of its new suburban stadium, a ballpark that will seat 41,500 and be surrounded by plenty of revenue-generating amenities.

The Braves said on their stadium website that the new facility in Cobb County will be the hub of a “play, work, stay” destination including shops, restaurants and entertainment venues, as well as a boutique hotel, office space and 500 residences.

RANGERS: Texas put left-handers Matt Harrison and Martin Perez on the disabled list, and could be without both starters for an extended period.

GM Jon Daniels said Harrison was diagnosed with significant nerve irritation in his vertebrae. He will have an injection Friday in an attempt to alleviate the symptoms before considering other options, including surgery.

Perez has a partial tear of his ulnar collateral ligament in his left elbow. He could have an injection and rehab that could keep him out three months, or possibly have Tommy John surgery and miss a year.

Right-hander Nick Tepesch was recalled from Triple-A Round Rock. The Rangers also purchased the contracts of right-handers Scott Baker and Miles Mikolas from Round Rock, and designated right-hander Justin Germano for assignment.