I wasn’t surprised to read that columnist Dan Demeritt (“Here’s why next governor will get nearly 50 percent of the vote,” May 11) believes Gov. LePage has a “unique ability to connect with voters through his passion and resolve.” After all, he’s a Republican political consultant.

But Greg Kesich’s recent column was a shocker (“LePage has his faults, but he excels at connecting with voters,” May 14). He, too, spoke of LePage’s ability to make an emotional connection with an audience, and never mind that his speech is “peppered … with misstated facts and wild conjecture.” It may not matter to Kesich, but how about the single working mom living in poverty who’s being demonized by the “wild conjecture”?

It’s appalling how low the bar is now for the highest office in the state. Kesich bemoans that he’s never seen Michaud show emotion. Maybe Mike’s found more constructive outlets for outsized emotions. Most people outgrow temper tantrums.

In his Community Chamber speech, LePage said he can work with Republicans and Democrats but “cannot make headway with liberals.” The truth is that he can work only with those who agree with him. He spent most of the most recent legislative session on the sidelines inking his veto pen.

There’s a term for someone in a position of power appealing to people’s fears and prejudices: “demagogue.” LePage’s sloppy speech has consequences.

Demeritt states that Michaud is the best at using pronouns like “us” and “we” in his messaging. I suspect that’s how he envisions the endeavor of being governor. That’s good news for all Mainers.

I long for the return of the days when we have a governor who openly loves Maine and her people and will unite us around shared goals. Someone who’ll bring out the best in everyone. In short, someone who will lead, for a change.