The downing of a passenger plane flying over Ukraine rattled U.S. financial markets Thursday, deepening a slide set off by a batch of disappointing company earnings and a weak home construction report.

All three major stock indexes ended lower for the first time in a week, but remained near record highs and positive for the year.

Ukrainian officials said a Malaysia Airlines passenger plane carrying 295 people was shot down, although both the government and pro-Russia separatists fighting in the region denied responsibility. The situation raised concerns of wider geopolitical instability in the region and an escalation of tensions between Russia and the West.

Investors responded by seeking refuge in U.S. government bonds. The yield on the 10-year Treasury note fell to 2.46 percent, the lowest level since May. Gold and oil prices rose.

SanDisk, AutoNation, Yum Brands and Mattel were among the biggest decliners after reporting earnings or profit forecasts that disappointed investors. Airline and homebuilder stocks also fell sharply.

“What happened with the plane today and things swirling around with what may have actually happened with the plane caused a bit of a sell-off,” said JJ Kinahan, chief strategist at TD Ameritrade. “The geopolitical risk is always the first one that people look for because it’s the one that changes the fastest. The market always hates uncertainty.”

The major stock indexes were down in premarket trading as investors pored through the latest company earnings and other news.

A pair of government reports pointed to an uneven U.S. recovery. The number of people seeking U.S. unemployment benefits fell last week, but home construction fell in June to the slowest pace in nine months, clouding the outlook for the housing recovery.

Homebuilders slumped on the news. M/I Homes led the decline, tumbling $1.38, or 5.8 percent, to $22.37.

“The housing starts numbers were weak, but housing has been incredibly volatile,” said Randy Frederick, managing director of trading and derivatives at the Schwab Center for Financial Research. “They were definitely disappointing.”

The CBOE Volatility Index, also known as the “VIX,” jumped 33 percent Thursday, reflecting investors’ uneasiness. The index reflects investors’ expectations of future volatility in the stock market.

All told, the Standard & Poor’s 500 index fell 23.45 points, or 1.2 percent, to 1,958.12. The index remains near its most recent all-time high of 1,985.44 set July 3.

The Dow slid 161.39 points, or 0.9 percent, to 16,976.81.

The Nasdaq composite sank 62.52 points, or 1.4 percent, to 4,363.45.

The yield on the 10-year Treasury note fell to 2.46 percent from 2.53 percent late Wednesday.