The precipitation depends on where you live as a nor’easter arrives today with winds up to 50 mph.

Rain, sleet and snow are settling in over Maine.

The type of precipitation you get will depend on where you live.

The National Weather Service in Gray is predicting that a nor’easter moving up the Atlantic coast will begin to produce snow Tuesday morning in Portland before converting to rain later in the day along the coast.

While Portland is due for a good soaking, NWS meteorologist James Brown said Monday the storm will have a different impact inland.

In the foothill areas of southern Oxford and Androscoggin counties, the storm will produce a mix of snow, rain and sleet, while mountainous regions will get snow.

“It will probably be mostly rain on the coast and snow in the mountains,” Brown said, with snow accumulation in the mountains reaching up to a foot.

The heaviest precipitation will occur Tuesday afternoon and evening and last through Wednesday.

Brown warned that while most coastal areas will see rain, the precipitation could be accompanied by extremely powerful winds gusts – up to 50 mph.

Unlike the Thanksgiving eve storm that dropped heavy, wet snow on most areas of the state and which resulted in thousands of power outages, this storm may not have such a dramatic impact.

“We’ve seen a lot of variability in the models over the past few days, but it seems to be coming together,” Brown said, referring to the types of precipitation it will produce.

Todd M. Gutner, a meteorologist at WCSH-TV in Portland, also predicted that the heaviest precipitation would fall Tuesday night into Wednesday, bringing 1 to 3 inches of rain along the coast.

To add to the bleakness of the forecast, Gutner expects the storm to park over New England through Friday, leading to more periods of snow and rain.

Partly because of the high winds, minor coastal flooding is possible during high tides through the week.

Frigid weather descended on Maine before the storm. The low temperature in Portland on Monday morning was 11 degrees.