LONDON — There may be more fruit, vegetables and healthy options available than ever before, but the world is mostly hungry for junk food, according to a study of eating habits in nearly 190 countries.

International researchers combed through more than 320 self-reported diet surveys from 1990 to 2010 and looked at how often people said they ate 17 common foods, drinks and nutrients including healthy choices like fruits, vegetables and fish and unhealthier alternatives like salt, processed meat and sugary drinks.

Experts found that even though people are eating more healthy foods including whole grains and fish, there has been an even bigger jump in the amount of junk food eaten. The study was paid for by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and Britain’s Medical Research Council and was published online Thursday in the journal, Lancet Global Health, as part of an obesity series.

Some of the study’s findings:

Older adults ate better than younger adults and women ate healthier than men.

Some of the best improvements were in Mongolia, Latin America and the Caribbean.

There was a mixed picture in the U.S., with increases both in the amount of healthy and unhealthy foods eaten.

China and India are catching up with Western countries’ junk food tastes.