LOS ANGELES — With an antibiotic-resistant “superbug” outbreak connected to its facility, Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center stopped short of pointing a finger at the manufacturer of a medical instrument believed to have spread the deadly germs. The maker of the product was careful not to blame the hospital as it issued new cleaning instructions emphasizing meticulous manual sterilization.

Things may not be so polite once lawyers get involved.

Lawsuits are expected to follow the outbreak tied to two deaths and several infections, with the hospital and manufacturer pointing fingers at each other.

“That’s exactly the kind of skirmishing you’re going to see,” said John Culhane, co-director of the Family Health Law & Policy Institute at the Widener University School of Law in Delaware. “The bottom line is that the two defendants will be hauled into court, and they’ll be trying to do two things: One, they didn’t do anything wrong; the second thing is to pin the blame on the other defendant.”

Two people have died at UCLA, and five others have been infected with the bacteria known as carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, or CRE, after undergoing similar endoscopic procedures to diagnose and treat pancreatic and bile-duct problems between October and January, hospital officials said. More than 170 other patients also may have been exposed.

The family of an 18-year-old student in grave condition from the bacteria is considering suing the endoscope’s manufacturer, Olympus Corporation of the Americas, an arm of Japan’s Olympus Corp, attorney Kevin Boyle said.

That hard-to-clean medical instrument used on more than half a million people in the U.S. every year has become the focus of the investigation into the outbreak.

Olympus emphasized in a statement Thursday that meticulous manual sterilization is needed. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration warned doctors Thursday that the device’s complex design and tiny parts make complete disinfection extremely difficult.