Sunday’s snowfall may have been light in comparison to the blizzards that have pummeled New England this season, but it was enough to remind Mainers that the season isn’t done with us yet.

Portland got a mere two-tenths of an inch of snow on Sunday, a reflection of the lighter accumulations that the late-winter storm dropped on southern and coastal Maine, but it was a different story in northern and Down East Maine.

Places such as Chesuncook in Piscataquis County, Robbinston in Washington County, Presque Isle in Aroostook County and Jackman in Somerset County were in the storm’s bull’s-eye, receiving a whopping 15, 12, 15.8 and 13 inches of snow, respectively.

Bridgton got just 3.5 inches and Lewiston got 2 inches, according to the National Weather Service in Gray.

Though the snowfall amounts in the Portland area were minuscule by comparison to those in northern Maine, many people say it’s time for winter to let go of its grip and for sunny skies and warmer weather to become the norm. Friday is the official first day of spring.

Skillins Greenhouses in Falmouth hosted its 51st annual Spring Open House on Sunday, wrapping up a three-day event that was well attended, according to co-owner Mike Skillin.

“I think most people have had enough,” Skillin said. “But people are seeing a progression in the weather. While they may not believe spring is here yet, they have great hope. Today, people were feeling pretty good. They were saying, ‘Phew, we made it.’ ”

Skillin said the spring planting season could begin by mid-April provided the snow melt that started recently continues.

Other Mainers have accepted their fate and realize that winter is probably going to hang on for a bit longer.

“I’ve already given up,” said Sue Milo of Portland. “It’s above 2 degrees, it’s not 2 feet, so I’ve learned to accept it. It’s March in Maine.”

Ben Porta, also of Portland, said he’s looking forward to spring and plans to play tennis and get out of the house more. And, he said, he was hopeful that spring had arrived last week, when the temperature managed to rise into the 50s Wednesday.

“I thought, ‘March is going to be nice,’ ” Porta said, “but I guess I’ve got to wait and see.”

Despite the rain, snow and gloom, there are others who see rays of hope that eventually this winter will end and spring and summer will finally come.

“March is a hopeful month,” Bill Wilson of Portland said Saturday. “The sun gets higher, there’s a lot more light. Everything is looking up, even on a gloomy day like this.”

For people like Bob Meyers, this winter has been the best he can remember since taking over two decades ago as executive director of the Maine Snowmobile Association. His organization represents 289 snowmobile clubs from Sanford to Allagash.

“It’s probably the best winter I’ve seen in 20 years. It’s pretty impressive,” Meyers said. “The trails have been consistently good everywhere I’ve been.”

Though the riding has been spectacular statewide, Meyers said all good things must come to end. He said some riders have run out of money because they have had so many good weekends stretching back into early January. Meyers predicts that those who can still afford the sport should be able to ride into mid-April.

Eric Sinsabaugh, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Gray, said it might be a good idea to keep those shovels handy. Though there is no snow forecast for this week, he said the snowy weather pattern that buried the state in January and February is still hanging around.

“We’re still stuck in the weather pattern that we’ve seen all winter,” Sinsabaugh said.

Monday should be nice, with highs in the 40s. Colder weather is expected Wednesday and Thursday.

Portland saw rain falling Saturday for the first time since Jan. 18, according to the weather service. The city got 0.83 inches of rain Saturday.