Dusty Baker was a big dipper. He’s cut back his chaw over the years, but still might pop in a pinch when games get tight.

The Washington Nationals manager won’t get that choice at some ballparks this season.

Big leaguers are now getting a reminder that smokeless tobacco is banned at stadiums in San Francisco, Los Angeles and Boston.

One-page letters are being put in clubhouse lockers throughout spring training. The notices come jointly from Major League Baseball and the players’ union.

“It’s a bad influence for the kids. Big time. I’ll say that. But also they’re adults, too, at the same time,” Baker said.

“We’ll see,” he said. “My daughter used to put water in my can and put it back in my truck. Or my son, he has lip check – ‘Get it out, Dad!’ “

Local laws will prohibit the use of all tobacco products at Fenway Park, Dodger Stadium and AT&T Park this year, meaning players, team personnel, umpires and fans. The letter advises the same ban will take effect at every California ballpark in December.

“I support it,” new Dodgers Manager Dave Roberts said. “I think that the intentions are there, and there’s obviously going to be some resistance with players.”

“Like it or not, players are role models, and we have a platform as coaches and players. So if that’s the law, then we definitely support it,” he said.

Similar legislation has been proposed in New York City, and both the Mets and Yankees say they back such a ban at their parks.

“Preventing children from being exposed to smokeless tobacco is an important initiative and we are glad to play our part,” the Mets said in a statement.

“Major League Baseball has long supported a ban of smokeless tobacco at the major league level and the New York Yankees fully support the proposed local law,” they said.

The letter being distributed to players on 40-man rosters and teams this spring says: “Please note that these are city ordinances and not rules established by Major League Baseball. However, the commissioner’s office will be monitoring players and club personnel for compliance with the regulations.”

Smokeless tobacco isn’t permitted throughout the minor leagues. There is no ban on dipping in the majors, and the issue is certain to be discussed in upcoming labor talks between MLB and the union on the contract that expires Dec. 1.

ROYALS: Joakim Soria is back with Kansas City, a relative soft tosser in the bullpen of the World Series champions.

The 31-year-old right-hander was the Royals’ closer from 2007-11 and averaged 93 mph with his fastball last year for Detroit and Pittsburgh. But Wade Davis, Kelvin Herrera and Luke Hochevar all reach 95-101 mph.

Soria has 202 saves, 160 of them with the Royals, and a 2.57 ERA in 444 relief appearances in the majors.

He missed the 2012 season after his second Tommy John surgery and signed with Texas before the 2013 season.

RANGERS: Yu Darvish was free and easy when throwing off a full-sized mound for the first time since elbow surgery last spring.

While not very talkative afterward, the ace said what mattered most to Texas: he’s pitching without any pain.

“Good, very good,” Darvish said through his interpreter after the scheduled 15-pitch session Monday. “No pain, no problem at all.”

BRAVES: Atlanta is bringing back former 10-time Gold Glove center fielder Andruw Jones as a special assistant to baseball operations.

Jones already was with the team as a guest instructor in spring training.

Under the official capacity, he will focus on working with Braves outfielders. Jones, a native of Curacao, also will assist with the team’s international initiatives.

METS: Right fielder Curtis Granderson was sent to an eye doctor as a precaution after arriving to the team’s spring training facility with a redness in one of his eyes.

Granderson missed Monday’s workout.

CARDINALS: Yadier Molina caught his first bullpen in camp Monday, another step in his comeback from thumb surgery. Ace Adam Wainwright was on the mound.

“You want a guy who throws it where he wants to,” Cardinals Manager Mike Matheny said.