DALLAS – The Latest on the shooting of police officers in Dallas (all times Eastern):

6:30 p.m.

Dallas Mayor Mike Rawlings says that when a gunman opened fire in the attack that killed five police officers, there were people in the crowd of protesters carrying rifles and wearing protective equipment who turned out not to be involved in the shooting.

Rawlings made his comments Friday in response to questions about initial police reports about possible other suspects. The attack happened at a protest about those recent killings by police.

He said the crowd included about 20 people carrying rifles and wearing protective gear. He says that like others, they started running after the shooting began. He said authorities started stopping them and interviewing them.

He says authorities later concluded that the “shooting came from one building at different levels from one suspect” and that the other people they’d stopped weren’t involved.

6:15 p.m.

Dallas Mayor Mike Rawlings says authorities believe a 25-year-old suspect in the attack that killed five police officers and wounded seven others was the lone attacker and that the city is safe.

Rawlings said at a news conference Friday that he believes the city can start healing now.

Police killed the suspect, Micah Xavier Johnson, using a robot-delivered bomb after they say negotiations with him failed. Two civilians also were wounded.

Gov. Greg Abbott says that although investigators believe Johnson was the only gunman, he thinks it’s imperative to make sure that there weren’t any co-conspirators or people who may have known in advance about the attack.

5:50 p.m.

The head of the Department of Homeland Security says ‘there appears to have been 1 gunman’ in the attack that killed five Dallas police officers and wounded seven others.

Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson said at a news conference Friday in New York City that the lone suspect, Micah Xavier Johnson, doesn’t appear to have had any known “links to or inspiration from any international terrorist organization.”

Police killed the 25-year-old Johnson with a robot-delivered bomb early Friday after negotiations for his surrender failed. Dallas Police Chief David Brown says Johnson said he was angry about the recent killings by police of black men in Louisiana and Minnesota and that he wanted to kill whites, particularly white officers. Johnson was black.

The attack happened at a protest about those recent killings by police. Two civilians were also wounded.

5:40 p.m.

Religious leaders have held an interfaith prayer vigil for the victims in the attack on Dallas police officers.

Speakers called for healing and for improvements in the way police and the public interact.

Pastor T.D. Jakes said those who gathered Friday at Thanks-Giving Square in downtown Dallas “cannot be oblivious to the plight of this nation.” He referenced incidents in Ferguson, Missouri, Baton Rouge, Louisiana and others in which black men were killed by white officers.

Dallas Mayor Mike Rawlings told the mixed-race crowd of several hundred people that the country must be willing to address racial issues. He says, “We as a city, as a state, as a nation are struggling with racial issues. Yes, it’s that word ‘race’. We’ve got to take it head on.”

Dallas Pastor Bryan Carter told the crowd they “share a common pain.”

5:15 p.m.

Dallas police say the slain suspect in the killings of five police officers had bomb-making materials, ballistic vests, rifles, ammunition, and a personal journal of combat tactics at his home.

They also say that people they interviewed have described 25-year-old Micah Johnson as a loner.

The department also said in a statement Friday that detectives have interviewed more than 200 members of law enforcement and that “it appears at least 12 officers” fired their weapons when someone opened fired on police Thursday night. It happened during a demonstration to protest the recent killings of black men by police in Louisiana and Minnesota.

Police killed Johnson using a robot-delivered bomb after negotiations failed.

They say detectives are in the processing of analyzing the information contained in the journal.

5 p.m.

Police say officers have been targeted in Tennessee, Georgia and Missouri in the aftermath of two high-profile killings of black men by law enforcement.

The attack in Tennessee occurred hours before the killing of five police officers in Dallas on Thursday night during a protest. The Tennessee Bureau of Investigation says the attacker told authorities that he was frustrated by the recent killings by police of black men in Louisiana and Minnesota.

Police have not disclosed a motive in Friday’s attacks in Georgia and Missouri, which have been described as ambushes.

In a fourth attack early Friday, a motorist fired at a police car as the officer drove by. In all, four officers were wounded. The officer wounded outside St. Louis is in critical but stable condition. The wounded officers are expected to survive.

4:45 p.m.

Two patrol cars have been parked outside of Dallas police headquarters to serve as a memorial to the five officers who were killed and seven who were wounded in an overnight attack.

The police department has been posting photos of people pausing by the memorial. Some have adorned the cars with flowers, signs and flags.

The attack began Thursday night during a protest of recent killings by police of black men in Louisiana and Minnesota. Two civilians were also wounded in the Dallas attack.

Police killed a suspect using a robot-delivered bomb after negotiations failed.

4:15 p.m.

A suburban St. Louis police chief says a motorist shot an officer three times as the officer walked back to his car during a traffic stop.

Ballwin Police Chief Kevin Scott said at a news conference Friday that the attack happened around 11 a.m. and was captured on video.

St. Louis County Police Chief Jon Belmar says the suspect, who is in his 30s, “ambushed” the officer, who is in critical but stable condition. His identity wasn’t released.

Authorities didn’t provide the race of the officer or the suspect or suggest a possible motive.

The shooting comes amid heightened tension following an attack in Dallas in which five police officers were killed and seven others and two civilians were wounded.

4 p.m.

Authorities say a driver shot and wounded a suburban St. Louis police officer during a traffic stop.

The shooting happened around 11 a.m. Friday in Ballwin.

St. Louis County Police Chief Jon Belmar didn’t disclose many details about the confrontation, including the race of the suspect or officer. He is expected to say more about the case later Friday.

He told KMOV-TV that the officer took “a hard hit” and was hospitalized, but he declined to elaborate on his condition.

Belmar says after shooting the officer, the suspect sped off but was spotted by another officer and abandoned his car. That officer captured the suspect after a short chase on foot.

The shooting comes amid heightened tension following an attack in Dallas in which five police officers were killed and seven others and two civilians were wounded.

3:45 p.m.

The Rev. Jesse Jackson has condemned the fatal shooting of five police officers in Dallas as a “cowardly and insane act of terrorism.”

The black civil rights advocate said at a Friday news conference in Chicago that the shootings, which apparently came in reaction to the killing by white police officers of black men in Louisiana and Minnesota, do not reflect “our struggle for justice whatsoever.”

Jackson notes that last week, the killing of 49 people in Orlando, Florida, was in the nation’s spotlight. He says “too much violence, too much fear make all of use less secure.”

He says his heart is “heavy at the thought of innocent police being killed.” He also spoke with Diamond Reynolds, who livestreamed to Facebook a video in the immediate aftermath of the fatal shooting of her boyfriend, Philando Castile, by police in Minnesota on Wednesday.

3:35 p.m.

United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon has condemned the killing of five police officers in Dallas, saying through a spokesman that “there is no justification for such violence.”

U.N. deputy spokesman Farhan Haq said Friday that “those responsible compounded the suffering that many in the United States feel following the killing of two African-American men over two days.”

Haq says it’s very hard and demanding work to be a police officer anywhere in the world and the secretary-general extends condolences to the families and colleagues of the victims and the Dallas Police Department.

He says the U.N. chief is also calling for thorough and impartial investigations into the killing of the two black men in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, and suburban Minneapolis.

The Dallas attack began Thursday night at a protest over the killings of those black men. In addition to the five deaths, seven officers and two civilians were wounded.

3:20 p.m.

President Obama has ordered flags lowered to half-staff to honor the 12 police officers and two civilians who were shot in an attack in Dallas.

Obama’s proclamation Friday applies to American flags flown at the White House and on all public buildings and grounds, military installations and Navy vessels. It extends through sunset Tuesday, July 12.

Gov. Greg Abbott ordered Texas flags to be flown at half-staff statewide during the same time period to honor the victims. Five of the officers were killed. The other seven and the two civilians were wounded.

The attack happened during what had been a peaceful protest over this week’s killings by police of black men in Louisiana and Minnesota.

Police say an armed suspect, who was a military veteran, was killed in a robot-delivered bomb blast to end a standoff. Several other people were detained for questioning.

2:55 p.m.

A friend of a man suspected in the deadly attack on Dallas police officers says his friend was educated and “wasn’t really political.”

Israel Cooper says 25-year-old Micah Xavier Johnson “wasn’t one of those, ‘ah man, white cops, blacks cops, you know'” kind of people.

A Texas law enforcement official identified Johnson to The Associated Press as a suspect who was killed by police with a robot-delivered bomb. He spoke on the condition of anonymity because he wasn’t authorized to release the information.

Cooper says he played basketball with Johnson dozens of times near Johnson’s suburban Dallas house. He says the last time he saw Johnson was a about week ago and that Johnson was “cool” with a “good vibe.”

Cooper says when he heard Johnson was a suspect he couldn’t believe it because Johnson wasn’t “a violent or rough dude.”

2:30 p.m.

Gov. Greg Abbott has issued an open letter to the people of Texas in response to the attack in Dallas that killed five police officers and wounded seven others.

Abbott titled the letter “A Time To Come Together,” and posted it online Friday. He also provided it to The Dallas Morning News.

In the letter, Abbott asks for prayers and underlines that “every life matters.” He urges Texans to come together and says “Texans are the first to open their hearts, their homes, their wallets to offer charity and love.”

Abbott closes by saying he has faith in the goodness of Texas and of America, “for in the end, evil always fails.”

2:25 p.m.

NASCAR has conducted a five-minute moment of silence to honor five Dallas police officers killed by snipers in an attack Thursday night.

Spokesman Kerry Tharp said Friday that Speedway Motorsports Inc. president Marcus Smith asked teams and drivers at Kentucky Speedway to participate in the silent tribute to coincide with the city’s planned ceremony for the officers at the same time. The PA played a bagpipe recording of “Amazing Grace” when the moment of silence ended.

Seven other officers and two civilians were wounded in the attack, which took place during a protest over this week’s killings by police of black men in Louisiana and Minnesota.

1:20 p.m.

A Texas Republican blames the words and actions of President Barack Obama and other prominent leaders for contributing to the deadly violence that occurred between police and individuals in Dallas.

Rep. Roger Williams said in a statement Friday that the “spread of misinformation and constant instigation by prominent leaders, including our president, have contributed to the modern day hostility we are witnessing between the police and those they serve.”

The shooting late Thursday left five police officers dead and seven wounded. Two civilians were also hurt.

Williams’ statement contrasts with the somber tone on the House floor and the effort by Republicans and Democrats to speak with one voice against the violence.

2 p.m.
Dallas Police Chief David Brown says a shooting attack that left five police officers dead was “well planned.”

Speaking at an interfaith prayer vigil in downtown Dallas on Friday, Brown called the shootings the previous night a “well-thought-out evil tragedy,” saying his force “won’t rest until we bring everyone involved to justice.”

Christian, Jewish and Muslim faiths were represented at the vigil that was attended by hundreds.

Seven other police officers were wounded in the shooting during a protest over the killing of black men by white police officers in Louisiana and Minnesota. Two civilians were also hurt, but Dallas Mayor Mike Rawlings has said no one suffered life-threatening injuries.

1:45 p.m.
Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump have put off political events out of respect for five police officers fatally shot during a protest in Dallas.

Clinton, the presumptive Democratic nominee, has postponed a rally scheduled for Friday in Pennsylvania, but still plans to travel to Philadelphia for a scheduled appearance at the African Methodist Episcopal Convention.

Trump has canceled his plans to address Hispanics in Miami on Friday.

The presumptive Republican nominee denounced the police deaths as “a coordinated, premeditated assault on the men and women who keep us safe.” Clinton says she is mourning the officers killed “while doing their sacred duty to protect peaceful protesters.”

1:35 p.m.

Authorities have apparently finished an initial search of the home of a suspect in the deadly attack on Dallas police officers.

Agents in Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives vests on Friday carried several bags of unknown materials from 25-year-old Micah Johnson’s home in the Dallas suburb of Mesquite.

Authorities stopped blocking off the street just before noon. No one answered a knock on the door at the home.

A Texas law enforcement official identified Johnson to The Associated Press as a suspect who was killed by police with a robot-delivered bomb. He spoke on the condition of anonymity because he wasn’t authorized to release the information.

1:20 p.m.

WASHINGTON – The Army says Micah Xavier Johnson, named as a suspect in the Dallas police shootings, served in the Army Reserve and did one tour of duty in Afghanistan.

The Army says Johnson was a private first class and his home of record is Mesquite, Texas. His military occupational specialty was carpentry and masonry.

His service dates, as provided by the Army, are March 2009 to April 2015.

The Army says Johnson deployed to Afghanistan in November 2013 and returned in July 2014.