NEW YORK — As the NBA looks for a new home for the 2017 All-Star Game, cities are lining up with open arms to welcome LeBron James, Stephen Curry and the $100 million or so the festivities would bring to the local economy.

New Orleans is the favorite, a person close to the situation told The Associated Press. The person said the league and city are “deep in negotiations” to stage the game there for a third time. The person spoke on condition of anonymity because the details of the discussions have not been publicly announced.

The league moved the game out of Charlotte on Thursday because of its objections to a North Carolina law that limits anti-discrimination protections for lesbian, gay and transgender people. The league also said it hoped to announce a new location for next February’s events shortly and will schedule the 2019 game for Charlotte if there is a resolution to the matter.

Even before the announcement, the league had heard from cities that were available and interested in taking over the weekend – now more like a week.

Besides having open dates in arenas, cities would need to have the necessary hotel space. Officials from several cities have expressed interest, including Boston and Atlanta.

But New Orleans, with its good February weather and entertainment options, is the “heavy favorite,” the person told the AP.

Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards said in a statement it would be an “honor” to have the game return to New Orleans.

“Louisiana is rich in diversity of heritage, culture, cuisine and people, and we believe the NBA could not select a better place for everyone to come and enjoy this spectacular sporting event,” he said.

New Orleans hosted the 2008 and 2014 NBA All-Star Games. The city is easily walkable and has moderate temperatures that time of year, a bonus after frigid temperatures the last two years in New York and Toronto.

The NBA announced plans for the 2008 game just nine months after Hurricane Katrina devastated the city in 2005. The weekend brought about $100 million into the city to aid its recovery.

The National Basketball Players Association said Friday it supported the league’s decision.

“North Carolina is home to a sizable number of current and former NBPA members. They and our entire membership looked forward to participating in the All-Star week activities in the Charlotte community,” the union said in a statement. “However, the enactment of legislation that challenges the right of all Americans from discrimination threatened the ability of every attendee to enjoy the All-Star festivities.”