How Americans feel about the state of their lives has improved markedly in the eight years since Obama was elected president, according to Gallup data released Tuesday.

In 2008, fewer than half of Americans said their life was good enough to be considered “thriving,” according to Gallup. But that’s changed: “The 55.4% who are thriving so far in 2016 is on pace to be the highest recorded in the nine years Gallup and Healthways have tracked it,” according to the report.

Not only that, members of each ethnic or racial group in Gallup’s study feel better about their lives.

“The percentages of U.S. whites, blacks, Hispanics and Asians who are thriving have all increased during the Obama era,” Gallup notes. The percentage of blacks thriving has risen by about 6 points, as has the percentage of whites and Hispanics. Asian thriving has risen by about 10 points since 2008.

Gallup measures “thriving” according to how poll respondents rate both their current lives and their expectations for life in the future. On a scale of zero to 10, “those who rate their present life a 7 or higher and their life in five years an 8 or higher are classified as thriving.”

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump recently made a much-criticized pitch to black voters, asking them “what do you have to lose” by voting for Trump over Hillary. That prompted a number of black voters to respond with what they’d be worried about losing, from civil rights to recent gains in employment, income and education.