Donald Trump is bragging that he has the backing of two of New England’s biggest sports stars.

The GOP nominee said at a Manchester, New Hampshire, rally early Tuesday morning that New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady called him to say he’d voted for him.

He also claimed he received a “the most beautiful” letter from Bill Belichick, the Patriots head coach, congratulating him, wishing him luck Tuesday, and commending him for the way he’d handled “an unbelievable negative and slanted media.”

“By the way, is there a better reference than Tom Brady and Bill Belichick?” he later asked the crowd. “I don’t think so.”

The Boston Globe reported that Brady cast his vote in Brookline Monday morning. By noon Tuesday,  Brady’s Facebook timeline was flooded with more than 1,500 comments ranging from enthusiastic support to harsh criticism.

One Facebook commenter, identified as Konner Robison, said, “I grew up your biggest fan. I have a picture you signed for me still hanging in my college room. I am ashamed and embarrassed for you if the the Trump comments are true. I thought you were a better human being that that.”

But Vinny Smith, another commenter, said in part, “Thanks Tom for endorsing Trump. Please ignore these so called ‘fans’ who say they won’t support you now; I’m 100% certain they weren’t real fans anyway. I love how tolerant many of these “fans” are of others who have differing opinions. Abandoning someone we’ve all known and loved over the years just because they endorsed a candiate you don’t like is exactly the type of stuff dividing this country. It’s like as long as Tom agrees with you, he’s the best. BUT as soon as he differs from what you believe in, he’s the worst. Bunch of hypocrites!”

Long lines, but few problems reported

Lines were long in some places, but few voters heading to the polls early Tuesday appeared to be encountering problems.

Presidential elections usually include sporadic voting problems, such as machines not working properly. Calls to Election Protection, a national voter helpline, included people reporting long lines as a result of machine problems in three precincts in Virginia. And election officials at a handful of precincts in Durham County, North Carolina, were using paper roll books after technical issues with computer check-in.

Ahead of the election, there was anxiety over whether voters would face problems. Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump said the election was rigged and Democrats warned that Republicans were planning to intimidate voters. There were also concerns about hackers disrupting election systems.

Trump Jr. says father will ‘respect the outcome’

Donald Trump’s eldest son says that his family will “respect the outcome” of a “fair election.”

Donald Trump, Jr. told CNN’s New Day Tuesday that he thinks his father “will remain involved somewhat” if he loses the election. He said he hopes that the energy surrounding his father’s campaign “goes back to the people we are trying to fight for, the people who haven’t had a voice in a long time.”

He said, in retrospect, that “hopefully we shed some light on the process,” and enabled people to speak their minds freely, “without being put in some basket, without being boxed in a corner.”

Clintons cast ballots in Chappaqua

Hillary and Bill Clinton are voting in their hometown of Chappaqua New York.

The Clintons greeted supporters waiting outside the polling place after casting their ballots Tuesday morning.

Hillary Clinton said it was “the most humbling feeling” to vote “because so many people are counting on the outcome of this election.”

Bill Clinton said he’s eager to be a political spouse, joking that he had “15 years of practice.”

Hillary Clinton and former President Bill Clinton greet supporters after voting in Chappaqua, N.Y., Tuesday morning. Associated Press/Seth Wenig

Hillary Clinton and former President Bill Clinton greet supporters after voting in Chappaqua, N.Y., Tuesday morning. Associated Press/Seth Wenig Associated Press/Seth Wenig

Obama plays traditional Election Day hoops

President Barack Obama is keeping up an Election Day tradition: a game of pick-up basketball with friends.

Obama arrived at the gymnasium at the Army’s Fort McNair in the District of Columbia around 8 a.m. He wore dark, casual clothes and a baseball cap, and carried a pair of high-top athletic shoes. The White House didn’t say who the president would be playing with.

On the day of his re-election in 2012, Obama’s basketball teammates included former Chicago Bulls player Scottie Pippen.

Obama started the Election Day tradition during the 2008 presidential campaign.

The president has been campaigning aggressively to help elect fellow Democrat Hillary Clinton, including headlining get-out-the-vote rallies for her in three states on Monday.

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump walks with his wife Melania to cast their ballots at PS-59, Tuesday in New York. Associated Press/ Evan Vucci

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump walks with his wife Melania to cast their ballots at PS-59, Tuesday in New York. Associated Press/ Evan Vucci

Trump expresses confidence, votes in NYC

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump cast his ballot at a school in New York City about 11 a.m.

Trump was joined at the polls by his wife, Melania Trump.

Vice presidential nominee Mike Pence rode a bike to his polling place in Indianapolis about the same time.

Earlier Tuesday, Trump told ‘Fox and Friends’ the presidential campaign has been an “amazing process” that put him in touch with the unfulfilled aspirations of the American people.

In the phone interview, the Republican presidential nominee said he’s seen “so many hopes and dreams that didn’t happen, that could have been helped with proper leadership.”

He said he “took a little heat” for bringing up “illegal immigration” from the day he launched his campaign, but “in the end it was the right thing to do.”

Trump said his campaign is a “movement” and the American people are “incredible.”

Asked if he had any regrets, Trump said “sure, there’s things I would have done different,” but he didn’t name any.

Trump also said: “We’re going to win a lot of states.” But in a rare moment of uncertainty, he added: “Who knows what happens ultimately?”

If rival Hillary Clinton wins, he said he won’t be looking back positively on a failed bid for the White House. “If I don’t win, I will consider it a tremendous waste of time, energy and money,” he said.

Trump said he’s spent over $100 million of his own money on his campaign. Federal Election Commission reports, however, show he’s more than $30 million short of that claim. According to fundraising records, Trump’s investment so far is about $66 million.

Republican vice presidential candidate Gov. Mike Pence stands with his wife Karen as they watch Donald Trump speak during a campaign rally early , Tuesday morning in Grand Rapids, Mich. Associated Press/Evan Vucci

Republican vice presidential candidate Gov. Mike Pence stands with his wife Karen as they watch Donald Trump speak during a campaign rally early , Tuesday morning in Grand Rapids, Mich. At about 11 a.m., Pence rode a bike to his polling place in Indianapolis to cast his vote.Associated Press/Evan Vucci Associated Press/Evan Vucci

Kaine keeps his Tuesday routine – diner chow with pals

Tim Kaine is not letting the biggest election of his life get in the way of his Tuesday routine.

After voting at 6 a.m. and doing a round of national morning TV shows, Kaine met a group of friends for breakfast at the City Diner in Richmond.

Kaine and his friends try to meet every Tuesday at the diner, a few miles from his home.

The U.S. senator and former Virginia governor was greeted with cheers as he walked into the restaurant.

In an interview with ABC’s “Good Morning America” Tuesday, Kaine said the battleground states of North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Florida and Ohio each hold the key to a win for the Democratic running mates.