August 30, 2012

Ryan: Romney won't 'duck tough issues'

"After four years of getting the runaround, America needs a turnaround," the Republican vice presidential candidate says.

The Associated Press

TAMPA, Fla. — Seizing the campaign spotlight, vice presidential candidate Paul Ryan accepted "the calling of my generation" to help lead the country in tough times Wednesday night and told roaring Republican National Convention delegates and a prime time TV audience that Mitt Romney and he will make the difficult decisions needed to repair the nation's economy.

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Republican vice presidential nominee, Rep. Paul Ryan speaks to delegates during the Republican National Convention in Tampa, Fla., on Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2012. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)

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Arizona Senator John McCain gestures as he walks up to the podium during the Republican National Convention in Tampa, Fla., on Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2012. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)

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"After four years of getting the runaround, America needs a turnaround, and the man for the job is Governor Mitt Romney," the 42-year-old Wisconsin lawmaker declared in what amounted to a debut on the national stage. However, the nation's attention was divided: He spoke at a convention dogged by Tropical Storm Isaac, downgraded from a hurricane but still inflicting misery on millions along the nearby northern Gulf Coast.

"We will not duck the tough issues; we will lead," Ryan said.

His speech was part attack on Democratic President Barack Obama and part spirited testimonial to Romney, all leavened by a loving tribute to Ryan's own mother, Betty, 78, seated across the hall in a VIP box. "To this day, my mom is a role model," he said while she beamed and exchanged smiles with one of his children as delegates cheered their approval.

A generation younger than Romney, he emphasized their differences as well as their commitment to tackle the economy.

"There are songs on his iPod which I've heard on the campaign bus — and on many hotel elevators," he said to laughter in the hall.

As for his own favorites, he said Romney "actually urged me to play some of these songs at campaign rallies. I said, 'I hope it's not a deal breaker, Mitt. But my playlist starts with AC/DC and ends with Zeppelin."

Turning serious, he said of Obama and the Democrats: "They've run out of ideas. Their moment came and went. Fear and division is all they've got left."

To the cheers of the delegates, he pledged Republicans would save Medicare from looming bankruptcy, despite constant accusations from Democrats that the GOP approach would shred the program that provides health care to more than 30 million seniors.

"Our nation needs this debate. We want this debate. We will win this debate," Ryan declared. But he offered no details of the remedy Republicans would propose.

Romney, in a secondary role if only for a moment, accused Obama of backing "reckless defense cuts" amounting to $1 trillion. Addressing the American Legion in Indianapolis, he said, 'There are plenty of places to cut in a federal budget that now totals over $3 trillion. But defense is not one of them."

In Tampa, the Romney team scripted an economy-and-veterans-themed program and kept a wary eye on Isaac. The storm remained a threat to levees in the New Orleans area almost exactly seven years after the calamitous Hurricane Katrina.

Inside the convention hall, delegates cheered a parade of party leaders past, present and — possibly — future.

The presidents Bush, George H.W., elected in 1988, and his son, George W., winner in 2000 and 2004, were featured in an evocative video. Arizona Sen. John McCain, the party's 2008 nominee, spoke on his 76th birthday and said he wished he'd been there under different circumstances. And an array of ambitious younger elected officials preceded Ryan to the podium, Sens. Rand Paul of Kentucky and John Thune of South Dakota among them.

(Continued on page 2)

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