Wednesday February 19, 2014 | 02:51 PM
Posted by Mike Tetreault

Not that I’m sick of winter, but I’m looking forward to hopping on a bicycle and riding. I love heading out from my house and riding through the Conservancy’s Basin Preserve roads, past Popham Beach and Fort Popham.

My thoughts of riding Maine’s scenic roads came to mind recently when organizers of BikeMaine announced a remarkable route for its second annual multi-day ride. The Nature Conservancy is proud to be a partner in this adventure.

This year’s 350-mile ride comes at a fine time of the year, Sept. 6-13, and highlights Maine’s waterways from Casco Bay to Sagadahoc and Kennebec Counties. The event’s 350 riders will see and honor the diverse treasure of Maine’s waters, from our rocky coast to rolling rivers and streams, to tranquil lakes and ponds.

The ride starts and ends at Westbrook, just west of Portland, and goes to Sebago Lake, the Belgrade Lakes region, to Gardiner and over the Kennebec River, Damariscotta, Boothbay Harbor, Wiscasset, Bath and along the coast to Yarmouth and back to Westbrook.

From our point of view, riders will see some great conservation in action – from Jugtown Plains, past the Androscoggin Riverlands, up to the Kennebec Highlands, and along the Damariscotta River and Merrymeeting Bay. This route passes through some of Maine’s most beautiful and ecologically valuable natural areas. The Conservancy is so pleased that cyclists participating in BikeMaine will be able to see some of Maine’s amazing places.

Doing 50 to 60 miles a day along this route, riders will get a great visual taste of the interplay between water and land and Mainers’ need for good, clean, healthy waters.

The ride is also a great chance to see how innovative Maine communities are increasingly welcoming bicycling as a mode of transportation, whether it’s for recreation or commuting.

The Nature Conservancy is proud to be a partner in BikeMaine. During their ride, we’ll share some information about the cool natural places on the route and highlighting our partners’ work to conserve lands and waters.

This is a great way for Maine people to engage in Maine’s great outdoors and recognize the essential role nature plays in our way of life.

Spring is just around the corner. So get ready to ride.

About this Blog

Subscribe to the
Maine, Naturally RSS


Mike Tetreault leads The Nature Conservancy in Maine, where he works with partners in conservation, government and community development to identify solutions which ensure that Maine's natural resources are available for people and for nature.

He holds a degree in environmental studies from Brown and a MS from the field naturalist program at the University of Vermont, and has studied resource management in Kenya, Mexico and throughout New England.

Tetreault started his career teaching wilderness leadership and environmental education, and has worked for The Nature Conservancy since 1998. He lives in Bath with his wife, their daughter and a menagerie of pets.


Subscribe to the
Maine, Naturally RSS

Previous entries

April 2014

March 2014

February 2014

January 2014

August 2013

July 2013

More

June 2013

March 2013

February 2013

January 2013

December 2012

November 2012

October 2012

Further Discussion

Here at PressHerald.com we value our readers and are committed to growing our community by encouraging you to add to the discussion. To ensure conscientious dialogue we have implemented a strict no-bullying policy. To participate, you must follow our Terms of Use.

Questions about the article? Add them below and we’ll try to answer them or do a follow-up post as soon as we can. Technical problems? Email them to us with an exact description of the problem. Make sure to include:
  • type of computer or mobile device your are using
  • exact operating system and browser you are viewing the site on (TIP: You can easily determine your operating system here.)
Prefer to respond privately? Email us here.