Tuesday August 13, 2013 | 08:12 AM

If you're like me, you're probably constantly admiring the rides of others.

It may not exactly be coveting, because your bike is surely one you'd hate to part with, but someone else may have a super cool seat pack or a bike that's a color you just can't miss (mine happens to be bright orange and royal blue, which is a color combo I think can't be beat).

If you're looking to own a bike that's truly unique, head online to RepublicBike.com where you can design your own. From wheels to chain to seat to colors for all of the above, you can create a bike that you can rest assured you'll never see traveling down the roadway being pedaled by someone else.

But first, a little history about Republic Bike ...

The company was started by twentysomething Avery Pack in Pompano Beach, Fla. On a 2008 afternoon that changed his life he got a call from Google.

The above Associated Press photo shows the bike Peck created for Google.

After creating 1,000 bikes for Google employees to make their way across their massive campus, others came calling. According to an Associated Press story about Republic, U-Haul bought foldable bikes so employees could get back to their personal transportation after parking trucks in the far reaches of a depot; Nike and Intuit have Republic bikes available on their campuses; Nestle ordered 500 Willy Wonka bikes as contest prizes; the television comedy "30 Rock" bought bikes as gifts for cast and crew members for the final episode.

Needless to say, Pack is doing OK.

Most of Republic's sales come from online customers who choose to design their own bikes. There are 13 colors available for 10 different components on fixed-gear, one-speed and three-speed bikes with prices starting at $400 for a basic model.

You can design and play with no obligation to purchase and pay. Here's the bike I created:

Don't be too jealous.

Further Discussion

Here at PressHerald.com we value our readers and are committed to growing our community by encouraging you to add to the discussion. To ensure conscientious dialogue we have implemented a strict no-bullying policy. To participate, you must follow our Terms of Use.

Questions about the article? Add them below and we’ll try to answer them or do a follow-up post as soon as we can. Technical problems? Email them to us with an exact description of the problem. Make sure to include:
  • type of computer or mobile device your are using
  • exact operating system and browser you are viewing the site on (TIP: You can easily determine your operating system here.)
Prefer to respond privately? Email us here.