August 27, 2013

Stock market slides after Kerry remarks

Secretary of State John Kerry's statement on a chemical attack in Syria jolts the market lower.

The Associated Press

NEW YORK — The stock market sagged Monday after the Obama administration ratcheted up pressure against Syria.

Secretary of State John Kerry said there was "undeniable" evidence of a large-scale chemical weapons attack in Syria last week, and his remarks suggested that the administration was edging closer to a military response.

Major indexes had been holding onto slight gains Monday until the last hour of trading. That's when Kerry's televised talk appeared to jolt it lower, said Stephen J. Carl, head equity trader at the Williams Capital Group.

The S&P 500 index ended with a loss of 6.72 points, or 0.4 percent, at 1,656.78. The index was up two points just before Kerry began reading his statement.

The Dow Jones industrial average fell 64.05 points, or 0.4 percent, to close at 14,946.46. The Nasdaq composite slipped 0.22 of a point, or 0.01 percent, to 3,657.57.

A handful of corporate deals gave the market a lift in the early going. Amgen surged following its announcement late Sunday that the biotech giant plans to buy Onyx Pharmaceuticals for $10.4 billion. The acquisition would give Amgen three approved cancer treatments and several other potential drugs.

In economic news, the government reported that orders for long-lasting manufactured goods plunged 7.3 percent last month, but Jack Ablin, the chief investment officer at BMO Private Bank in Chicago, said it's likely that investors are looking past the one bad economic report because so many major events loom ahead.

• The Federal Reserve will start a two-day meeting Sept. 17, during which officials will discuss phasing out support for the economy.

• After that, Germany holds national elections that could change how the region handles rescue loans for troubled countries.

• Congress returns from its summer break next week and will take up a new budget before the fiscal year starts on Oct. 1.

"These issues are big enough to transcend daily data," Ablin said.

 

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