The Portland Press Herald / Maine Sunday Telegram http://www.pressherald.com Tue, 27 Sep 2016 19:04:36 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.3.6 Senate blocks bill needed to keep government open http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/senate-blocks-bill-needed-to-keep-government-open/ http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/senate-blocks-bill-needed-to-keep-government-open/#comments Tue, 27 Sep 2016 19:04:36 +0000 http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/senate-blocks-bill-needed-to-keep-government-open/ WASHINGTON — The U.S. Senate on Tuesday blocked a spending bill needed to keep government open beyond a Friday midnight deadline.

This story will be updated.

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One of 2 boys denies charges linked to chase in front-end loader http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/one-of-2-boys-denies-charges-linked-to-chase-in-front-end-loader/ http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/one-of-2-boys-denies-charges-linked-to-chase-in-front-end-loader/#comments Tue, 27 Sep 2016 19:01:44 +0000 http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/one-of-2-boys-denies-charges-linked-to-chase-in-front-end-loader/ Two 14-year-old boys accused of taking a front-end loader on a dangerous, low-speed chase Sept. 12 appeared before a Lewiston District Court judge Tuesday.

During the brief hearing, Matthew Fortin’s attorney, Richard Charest, chose not to enter a response to the petition of eight charges. Fortin will continue to be held at Longcreek Youth Development Center in South Portland, where he has been since his arrest sept. 12.

At Fortin’s side were two adults who were not identified during the proceeding, but who embraced Fortin before he was led away. The adults left the courtroom and could not be located for an interview.

Shawn Demarest, who is facing the same eight charges, denied the allegations through his attorney, Cailley Bonti. In the juvenile court system, denial of charges is the equivalent to pleading not guilty. The proceeding was open to the media because both teens are charged with felonies.

Fortin is due back in court Oct. 11, when a judge could decide whether to allow him to be released from Longcreek to his family or some other facility, such as a treatment center.

Bonti, meanwhile, requested more time before Demarest’s next appearance because she had just received the case and needed time to evaluate the discovery material. He is due back in court Nov. 15.

A woman who said she was Demarest’s mother, who sat beside him at the hearing, declined to comment after the hearing.

The boys allegedly stole a large front-end loader in Gardiner during the early morning hours Sept. 12, leading police through Sabattus and Lewiston before they steered the loader onto the southbound lanes of the Maine Turnpike.

When the loader crossed into the northbound lanes, police stopped it by shooting out the tires, and the boys were taken into custody.

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Driver found not guilty in fatal hayride crash in Mechanic Falls http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/jurors-begin-deliberations-in-maine-hayride-death/ http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/jurors-begin-deliberations-in-maine-hayride-death/#comments Tue, 27 Sep 2016 18:31:06 +0000 http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/jurors-begin-deliberations-in-maine-hayride-death/ BATH — A jury has found David Brown not guilty of reckless conduct in connection with a fatal hayride crash in 2014 that resulted in the death of an Oakland teenager.

Brown, 56, of South Paris, drove the Jeep pulling the hayride wagon. He has been on trial since late last week for a misdemeanor charge of reckless conduct.

He was charged after investigators determined that a mechanical failure in the Jeep he was driving that night at a Mechanic Falls farm caused the hayride to plummet down a gravel slope and crash into a tree.

A 17-year-old Oakland girl, Cassidy Charette, died in the accident, while more than 20 others were injured, including Brown, who broke ribs and suffered a concussion.

Prosecutors from Androscoggin County are trying to prove that Brown, who has a Class B commercial driver’s license and still works as a professional driver, consciously disregarded the risks associated with the four-wheel drive, automatic shift vehicle he operated that night.

In testimony Monday and Tuesday, Brown said that he was not aware of any brake issues with the Jeep.

In closing remarks Tuesday, defense attorney Allan Lobozzo echoed Brown’s remarks and pointed out that a day before the accident, Brown had mentioned an issue with the carburetor in the Jeep he was driving, which was promptly resolved by mechanics at the farm.

Before the 12 jurors left to deliberate, Lobozzo repeatedly asked them to consider whether a man like Brown would have “thrown caution to the wind” and driven a vehicle he knew was going to have brake failure.

“Mr. Brown could not have in any way anticipated the forces that came together that night (of the accident),” Lobozzo said.

He also pointed out that Maine does not regulate the operation of recreational hayrides around the state, a fact to which Maine State Fire Marshal Joseph Thomas testified on Monday.

“I would suggest that the evidence of the state could be dubbed the hubris of hindsight,” Lobozzo said. Brown, he continued, has been prosecuted “for violating a standard that does not exist.”

Before they recessed, Androscoggin County Superior Court Justice MaryGay Kennedy reminded jurors that Brown was presumed innocent under the justice system and that prosecutors had to prove beyond a reasonable doubt that he was guilty of the reckless conduct charge, a Class D misdemeanor that’s punishable by up to 364 days in jail and a $2,000 fine.

The trial was moved to Sagadahoc County Superior Court in Bath upon request of the defense, who argued that there was too much media attention on the case in Androscoggin County.

In his own closing arguments, James Andrews, deputy district attorney for Androscoggin County, contended that Brown wasn’t immune from Maine’s criminal statutes.

“It was a storm that was not difficult to forecast,” Andrews said of the brake issues that led to the accident. “It had huge thunder clouds forming in the sky. Any reasonable person should have seen it coming.”

Andrews referred back to reports from several investigators and engineers about the poor condition of the Jeep’s brakes that night and what it would have taken for the vehicle to lose control while towing a trailer loaded with hay and people down a relatively steep grade.

He also pointed that, as a professional driver, Brown regularly checks the brakes on trucks he operates.

This story will be updated.

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Man who was texting will serve 90 days in fatal hit-and-run in Turner http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/man-who-was-texting-to-serve-90-days-in-fatal-hit-and-run-in-turner/ http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/man-who-was-texting-to-serve-90-days-in-fatal-hit-and-run-in-turner/#comments Tue, 27 Sep 2016 18:25:36 +0000 http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/man-who-was-texting-to-serve-90-days-in-fatal-hit-and-run-in-turner/ LEWISTON – A man who pleaded no contest to leaving the scene after fatally striking a woman with his truck has been ordered to serve 90 days in jail.

The Sun Journal reports that Kevin Scribner, 28, of Harrison, was sentenced Tuesday under terms of a plea agreement in Lewiston District Court.

Police say Scribner told investigators he was texting just before the September 2015 crash that killed 21-year-old Brittany Stanhope in Turner. Authorities say the Paris woman was hit while standing alongside the road after her car developed mechanical problems.

The judge sentenced Scribner to two years in prison but suspended all but 90 days. Scribner also must serve two years of probation.

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Portland councilors call for tenant protections, task force http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/portland-councilors-call-for-tenant-protections-task-force/ http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/portland-councilors-call-for-tenant-protections-task-force/#comments Tue, 27 Sep 2016 18:06:49 +0000 http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/portland-councilors-call-for-tenant-protections-task-force/ Leaders of the Portland City Council’s special housing committee want to give the city’s renters more protection from an unforgiving housing market that has fueled fast-rising rents and mass evictions.

Councilors Jill Duson and David Brenerman plan to present a handful of proposals Wednesday at a meeting of the committee. Duson is the chairwoman and Brenerman is the vice-chairman.

The package includes:

• Increasing the required notification for rent increases from 45 to 60 days.

• Creating a tenant/landlord task force comprised of six members and co-chaired by one landlord and one tenant representative. It would serve as an advisory panel to the council and as a clearinghouse to the public on landlord/tenant and housing issues.

• Requiring landlords and tenants to sign a document explaining tenancy-at-will versus formal leases.

• Requiring landlords to give tenants a brochure outlining tenant and landlord rights and responsibilities.

• Incorporating into city ordinances a Maine Human Rights Act prohibition against income discrimination.

The housing committee is expected to vote on the recommendations, which would need to be approved by the full council. The meeting on Wednesday begins at 5:30 p.m. in Council Chambers.

The story will be updated.

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New Jersey minister heads to Maine to defend LePage on drug crisis approach http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/new-jersey-minister-headed-to-maine-to-defend-lepage-on-drug-crisis-approach/ http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/new-jersey-minister-headed-to-maine-to-defend-lepage-on-drug-crisis-approach/#comments Tue, 27 Sep 2016 18:06:49 +0000 http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/new-jersey-minister-headed-to-maine-to-defend-lepage-on-drug-crisis-approach/ AUGUSTA – A New Jersey minister who supports Gov. Paul LePage’s approach to solving Maine’s opioid addiction crisis will be in Maine on Wednesday to “defend” LePage, who has been embroiled in controversy over his comments on drugs and race.

A statement issued by Camp Constitution and headlined, “Black Minister to Hold Press Conference at the State House to Defend Governor LePage” was circulated by volunteers working with the Rev. Steven Craft.

Hal Shurtleff, an organizer with Camp Constitution, said his nonprofit is focused on educating people on the Christian components of the U.S. Constitution and said Craft was coming to Maine, in part to show his support for LePage and to refute charges of racism. “The media is playing the race card,” Shurtleff said, explaining why Craft, who is African-American, is coming to speak in defense of LePage.

Craft could not immediately be reached for comment Tuesday.

It was unclear if LePage is aware of Craft’s visit. Shurtleff said LePage had been invited to attend the news conference but had not accepted the invitation.

LePage’s office did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

According to the statement, Craft was a heroin addict for 10 years but has been in recovery for the last 40. He is also the executive director of Christian Citizenship Ministries Inc.

“Rev. Craft knows about the drug addiction epidemic firsthand,” the release said.

During a North Berwick town hall meeting in August, LePage described a binder he compiled of news reports, news releases and booking mug shots showing that “90-plus percent” of those charged with heroin trafficking crimes in Maine since January were either black or Hispanic and coming from outside of Maine.

Those comments, and an obscenity-laden voice message he left for Rep. Drew Gattine, D-Westbrook, drew charges of racism and attracted national media attention to the state.

LePage and his staff have not responded to repeated questions about why the race of a drug dealer matters.

On Monday, LePage’s office released copies of the contents of the three-ring binder in response to numerous public records requests from media outlets and the American Civil Liberties Union of Maine.

A review of the contents of the binder showed that only about 40 percent of the drug dealers appeared to be black or Hispanic. LePage’s staff has tried to explain that when he singled out blacks and Hispanics for attention, the governor was referring only to people who were bringing heroin into Maine from out of state.

Shurtleff, the spokesman for the New Jersey minister, said Craft was coming to Maine to defend LePage on, “the racist charges.” He said Craft would also discuss the proper way to deal with the state’s addiction crisis.

The mission of Craft’s Christian Citizenship Ministries “is to restore American jurisprudence to its Biblical foundations,” according to the organization’s webs site.

“As a flexible, multi-faceted speaker, Reverend Craft can compose his message to meet a variety of audiences, always promising an insightful and power-pact (sic) presentation,” the website reads.

Craft is schedule to appear in the Welcome Center of the State House at 11 a.m. on Wednesday.

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Watch: A young black girl’s heartbreaking testimony to Charlotte leaders http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/watch-a-young-black-girls-heart-breaking-testimony-to-charlotte-city-leaders/ http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/watch-a-young-black-girls-heart-breaking-testimony-to-charlotte-city-leaders/#comments Tue, 27 Sep 2016 17:59:02 +0000 http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/watch-a-young-black-girls-heart-breaking-testimony-to-charlotte-city-leaders/ Almost too small to reach the microphone, Zianna Oliphant stepped to the podium at the Charlotte City Council meeting on Monday.

Six days had passed since the fatal police shooting of Keith Lamont Scott – a period marked by anger and unrest in North Carolina’s largest city. Zianna had come to discuss race relations. More specifically, the young girl wanted to talk to city leaders and police about being black.

“I’ve come here today to talk about how I feel, and I feel like that we are treated differently than other people,” she said. “I don’t like how we’re treated. Just because of our color – doesn’t mean anything to me.

“I believe that . . .”

Then, she bowed her head and broke down in tears.

“You’re doing great,” someone shouted from the crowd. “You’re doing a great job.”

“Don’t stop,” another adult quickly chimed in. “Do not stop!”

At the first council meeting since Woods was fatally shot, many Charlotte residents sharply criticized Mayor Jennifer Roberts, Police Chief Kerr Putney and other city leaders for how they responded to the deadly encounter and for how information was conveyed to the public.

Protesters had clogged the city’s streets night after night, calling on police to release video of the shooting. Putney first said he had no plans to release the footage to the public, telling reporters that “transparency is in the eye of the beholder.”

The department ultimately released two videos, neither of which answered a key question: Was Scott pointing a gun at police when he was fatally shot? (As it turned out, one of the officers failed to turn on his body camera when he responded to the call, which goes against department policy.)

On Monday night at the Charlotte Mecklenburg Government Center, less than 10 miles from the scene of Scott’s fatal encounter with police, residents flooded the council meeting to voice their displeasure.

“Hands down! Shoot back!” they shouted. “No justice, no peace!”

They also demanded that authorities “release, release – the whole damn tape,” according to the Charlotte Observer.

One speaker, Henry Lee, demanded that the mayor and police chief step down.

“The way it was handled, the secrecy, the lies – we don’t deserve this,” he told the council, according to the Observer. “People are losing their lives, and you are backing these people with these policies. You don’t deserve to be the mayor of this fine city. You are on the verge of bringing this fine city to its knees – step down.”

During the emotionally charged meeting, Zianna got up to say her piece.

She wore a T-shirt decorated with a rainbow-colored skull-and-crossbones, with hearts floating from it.

A young boy helped her lower the microphone.

“We are black people and we shouldn’t have to feel like this,” Zianna said, sobbing. “We shouldn’t have to protest because y’all are treating us wrong. We do this because we need to and have rights.”

The girl, whose age was reported by some local news outlets as 10, said she was born and raised in Charlotte. But until recently, she said, “I’ve never felt this way.”

“I can’t stand how we’re treated,” she said, as tears streamed down her cheeks.

“It’s a shame that our fathers and mothers are killed and we can’t even see them anymore. It’s a shame that we have to go to that graveyard and bury them. And we have tears, and we shouldn’t have tears.

“We need our fathers and mothers to be by our side.”

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Coast Guard questioning man plucked from raft after a week at sea http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/coast-guard-questioning-man-plucked-from-raft-after-a-week-at-sea-2/ http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/coast-guard-questioning-man-plucked-from-raft-after-a-week-at-sea-2/#comments Tue, 27 Sep 2016 17:26:50 +0000 http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/coast-guard-questioning-man-plucked-from-raft-after-a-week-at-sea-2/ BOSTON — A Vermont man who spent a week at sea in a life raft before being rescued by a passing freighter arrived in Boston on Tuesday and was being questioned by Coast Guard officials.

Nathan Carman, of Vernon, spent seven days in a four-person, inflatable life raft after his 31-foot aluminum fishing boat sank. His mother, Linda Carman, 54, of Middletown, Connecticut, is still missing and presumed dead, Coast Guard officials said.

Nathan Carman, 22, was taken to Boston by the same freighter that rescued him, then transported by a Coast Guard boat to shore. He appeared healthy and alert. He did not speak as he stepped off the boat and was quickly taken to a waiting car.

Petty Officer 2nd Class LaNola Stone said the Coast Guard was conducting a “survivor debriefing” with Carman, a standard procedure for people who are rescued at sea.

“We want to find out what happened, what can we do better to aid a search and rescue in the future,” Stone said.

She said Carman was to be reunited with his family once the debriefing is completed.

Carman and his mother set off for a fishing trip Sept. 18, but their boat sank. The Coast Guard searched for the mother and son for days but called off the search Friday. Nathan Carman was found by a passing freighter – in good condition – two days later. He was discovered off the coast of Massachusetts, about 100 nautical miles south of Martha’s Vineyard.

Petty Officer 3rd Class Nicole Groll said Coast Guard officials spoke by phone with Carman after he was rescued by the freighter. Groll said he said when his boat started to sink, it went down quickly.

“He looked for his mother and did not see her. He had some food and water, and he jumped into the life raft, and that was it,” Groll said Monday.

Groll said the Coast Guard did not receive a distress call, but she was unsure if the boat was equipped with a VHF radio that could be used to contact emergency personnel.

Family members have said Nathan Carman has Asperger’s syndrome, a form of autism.

Hubert Santos, a high-profile Connecticut attorney, told The Hartford Courant that his firm sent a lawyer to Boston to meet Carman.

Santos, who said he previously represented him on another matter, said his office has contacted the Coast Guard and the U.S. attorney’s office in Connecticut and Massachusetts to let them know that whether “he needs a lawyer or not,” Carman has an attorney who wants to be present before any interviews are done.

The family was also struck by tragedy in 2013 when Linda Carman’s 87-year-old father, John Chakalos, of Windsor, Connecticut, was found fatally shot in his home. The death was ruled a homicide; no arrest has been made. Earlier this year, the family offered a $250,000 reward for information leading to an arrest and conviction of Chakalos’ killer.

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Scientists create blood-alcohol test that wears like a tattoo http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/scientists-create-a-tattoo-that-reads-blood-alcohol-level/ http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/scientists-create-a-tattoo-that-reads-blood-alcohol-level/#comments Tue, 27 Sep 2016 17:26:28 +0000 http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/scientists-create-a-tattoo-that-reads-blood-alcohol-level/ Are you sober enough to drive? The familiar way to test levels of blood alcohol (without actually drawing blood) is with breathalyzers. They are used by police trying to identify drunk drivers and in ignition-locking devices designed to prevent intoxicated people from starting a car.

But breath analysis can be distorted by such factors as ambient humidity and the use of mouthwash. Research has shown that sweat might provide a more reliably accurate medium. In an article published in ACS Sensors, a journal of the American Chemical Society, scientists from the University of California at San Diego report that they have developed a flexible, wearable and even “attractive” skin patch that detects blood alcohol in the wearer’s sweat, then sends the results to a smartphone.

The researchers made the patch from temporary-tattoo paper embedded with flexible electronics. It works by delivering a small amount of pilocarpine (a drug that stimulates the secretion of sweat) to the wearer’s skin using electrical current, a process called iontophoresis. The patch electrochemically assesses the sweat’s alcohol content. And the data is transmitted to your mobile device via a Bluetooth connection. The whole process takes less than eight minutes.

Calling it “the first example of a completely wearable tattoo-based alcohol biosensor system,” the researchers say the device could easily be mass-produced and sold to law enforcement agencies, businesses and individuals.

Besides linking to ignition-lock devices in cars, they note, “such single-use printed tattoos could be used by bartenders or friends to identify patrons that become intoxicated.” They note that future systems would have to be modified to ensure privacy and data security.

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Trump to Clinton: Paying no income taxes ‘makes me smart’ http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/trump-to-clinton-paying-no-income-taxes-makes-me-smart/ http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/trump-to-clinton-paying-no-income-taxes-makes-me-smart/#comments Tue, 27 Sep 2016 16:36:22 +0000 http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/trump-to-clinton-paying-no-income-taxes-makes-me-smart/ Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton called out Republican Donald Trump Monday night for paying no federal income taxes on some of his returns from decades ago.

Trump responded, “That makes me smart.”

The exchange centered on an issue that has dogged Trump throughout the campaign. He has departed from roughly four decades of tradition for presidential nominees by not releasing his tax returns. Trump says his returns are under an IRS audit, and he won’t release them until that’s complete. IRS officials say there’s no rule preventing taxpayers from releasing their returns, even when they’re under audit.

On Monday, Clinton — who has posted nine years’ worth of tax returns online — speculated on Trump’s reasons for not releasing his. “There’s something he’s hiding,” she said, adding that it might be that his net worth is less than the $10 billion he claims, or that he hasn’t given much to charity, or that he owes money to Wall Street and foreign banks.

“Or maybe he doesn’t want the American people — all of you watching tonight — to know that he’s paid nothing in federal taxes,” Clinton said. “Because the only years that anybody’s ever seen were a couple of years when he had to turn them over to state authorities when he was trying to get a casino license and they showed he didn’t pay any federal income tax.”

The Washington Post reported earlier this year that returns Trump had filed with the New Jersey Casino Control Commission in 1981 showed that he’d paid no federal income taxes in 1978 and 1979. The Post reported that the same filings showed that he had paid $18,714 in taxes on $76,210 in income in 1975; he paid $10,843 in taxes on $24,594 in income in 1976; and he paid $42,386 in taxes on $118,530 in income in 1977.

For 1978 and 1979, Trump took advantage of a tax-code provision popular with developers that allowed him to report negative income, according to the Post. He told the newspaper, “When you’re in the real estate business, you do have certain tax advantages.” Developers can depreciate the value of real estate to reduce their taxable income.

Politico reported that Trump appeared to have paid no federal income taxes in 1991 and 1993, when his casino holdings were in trouble and regulators were monitoring his finances. “Welcome to the real estate business,” Trump said in an e-mail to the news website, via his spokeswoman.

Trump told ABC News in May that he works “very hard to pay as little tax as possible.”

On Monday night, Trump responded to Clinton’s accusations by saying “politicians like Secretary Clinton” squandered tax money, making the U.S. a debtor nation. “We’re a serious debtor nation,” he said.

The U.S. needs to repair infrastructure nationwide, but “we don’t have the money because it’s been squandered on so many of your ideas,” he said to Clinton.

“And maybe it’s because you haven’t paid any federal income tax for a lot of years,” she said.

“It would be squandered too, believe me,” he responded.

Trump on Monday repeated an offer he’d made previously — that he’d release his tax returns if Clinton releases more than 30,000 deleted e-mails that her attorneys didn’t turn over to the U.S. State Department.

Clinton’s campaign has said those e-mails, stored on a private e-mail server that Clinton used during her term as secretary of state, were found to be unrelated to her public role and were deleted. Her lawyers turned over thousands of e-mails that they said were work-related.

After a yearlong federal investigation, Federal Bureau of Investigation Director James Comey said in July that Clinton and her top aides were “extremely careless” in handling classified information, but there wasn’t sufficient evidence of intentional wrongdoing to prosecute them. The Justice Department closed the case.

Clinton on Monday called her decision to use the private server “a mistake.” Trump said it was more than a mistake, though, because it was intentional.

Trump also repeated that he would release his tax returns when an IRS audit concludes. In March, Trump’s campaign released a letter from his tax lawyers saying his returns for 2002 through 2008 were no longer under audit, but Trump has yet to release them.

– With assistance from Lynnley Browning

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UMaine picked to finish last in Hockey East http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/umaine-picked-to-finish-last-in-hockey-east/ http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/umaine-picked-to-finish-last-in-hockey-east/#comments Tue, 27 Sep 2016 16:33:17 +0000 http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/umaine-picked-to-finish-last-in-hockey-east/ BOSTON — The University of Maine was predicted to finish last in the Hockey East this season, according to a poll of league coaches released Tuesday during the league’s annual media day.

Boston University was predicted to finish first, followed by Northeastern and Notre Dame in a tie for second. UMass-Lowell was picked to finish fourth.

Maine, which has been rebuilding under coach Red Gendron, finished 11th out of 12 teams last season, with a 5-15 conference mark (8-24-6 overall).

“It is what it is,” said Gendron with a shrug. “I really don’t care.”

Gendron, in his fourth year, said “we look pretty good … we have a lot of freshmen, but we have talented freshmen.”

Among the freshmen class are three NHL draft picks – forwards Chase Pearson and Patrick Shea, and defenseman Patrick Holway.

Maine’s senior captains are forward Cam Brown, forward Blaine Byron and defenseman Eric Schurhamer.

The Black Bears play an exhibition game Sunday at Alfond Arena against St. Francis Xavier. Maine opens its regular season the following weekend, Oct. 7-8 at home, against Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.

The rest of the Hockey East poll included, in order of voting, Providence, Boston College, Connecticut, Vermont, Merrimack, New Hampshire and Massachusetts.

This story will be updated.

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Steve Hewins named new director of state hospitality association http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/hewins-named-new-director-of-state-hospitality-association/ http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/hewins-named-new-director-of-state-hospitality-association/#comments Tue, 27 Sep 2016 16:10:20 +0000 http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/hewins-named-new-director-of-state-hospitality-association/ A veteran travel consultant who spent two years at the helm of the city’s downtown association is the new leader of the state’s restaurant and innkeepers associations.

Steve Hewins will jointly manage the Maine Restaurant Association and the Maine Innkeepers Association, succeeding Greg Dugal, who submitted his resignation last November but who will remain on as a lobbyist for the two groups.

“I’ve been in the hospitality and visitor industry for my entire career and I truly love it,” Hewins said in a written statement on Tuesday. “I believe that it’s a key component of Maine’s economy and critical to its future.”

The two groups, which adopted a joint management structure in 2013, represent the hospitality industry in Maine, which employs 77,000 people and generates more than $3.6 billion annually. The groups have almost 1,200 members across the state.

As president, Hewins will report to the board of Hospitality Association Management Services, the joint management group, which includes six board members from the two associations. He will oversee a staff of five and manage the combined budgets of $850,000.

Hewins entered the industry in the 1980s. He founded a travel agency, Hewins Travel. Over 25 years, he built it into Maine’s largest travel agency, with locations across the state. He sold it to AAA Northern New England in 2007, where he became a vice president for six years.

In 2013, Hewins was named director of Downtown Portland, a nonprofit organization created to promote downtown living, business and tourism. In his two years there, he implemented a new strategic plan and expanded the Old Port Festival into a three-day event.

Hewins also had a brief stint in Nova Scotia’s tourism office in Portland at the start of his career.

Hewins is chairman of the University of Southern Maine Hospitality and Tourism Advisory Board and also sits on the boards of the Greater Portland Convention and Visitors Bureau, the Maine Convention Center Collaborative and the University of Maine Alumni Association.

This story will be updated.

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Target customers mourning loss of nifty red pill bottles http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/target-customers-mourning-loss-of-nifty-red-pill-bottles/ http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/target-customers-mourning-loss-of-nifty-red-pill-bottles/#comments Tue, 27 Sep 2016 15:39:34 +0000 http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/target-customers-mourning-loss-of-nifty-red-pill-bottles/ Longtime customers of Target’s pharmacies are finding a change in pill bottle design hard to swallow.

After CVS began operating Target’s drugstores earlier this year, distraught customers have been asking – in some cases begging – the drugstore chain to bring back the retailer’s red prescription bottles, which came with color-coded rings, labeling on the top and prescription information that was easier to read.

Some customers also took more drastic steps.

Vivian Ruth Sawyer went fishing through her trash to rescue the old Target bottles soon after opening her stapled prescription bag to find the dowdy, white-capped amber vials that are common in most medicine cabinets. She has since poured refills of her thyroid medicine into the old Target bottles, even though they don’t have the right expiration dates. It’s worth it, she said, because those bottles make it easier to tell her prescriptions apart when she looks in her drawer for them.

“This is really inconvenient and irritating,” the Louisville, Kentucky, resident said.

An open, amber-colored CVS pharmacy bottle lies between two of the innovative  red ones that Target used before CVS took over operation of Target's drugstores earlier this year. Mel Evans/Associated Press

An open, amber-colored CVS pharmacy bottle lies between two of the innovative red ones that Target used before CVS took over operation of Target’s drugstores earlier this year. Mel Evans/Associated Press

CVS says it is working on designing a new system for dispensing prescriptions and helping people stay on their medications, but spokeswoman Carolyn Castel declined to share details or say whether that might involve an updated bottle design.

Meanwhile, shoppers continue to mourn the loss of a bottle that was considered groundbreaking when it debuted about a decade ago. Target flipped bottle design on its head when it introduced in 2005 a red container with the opening on the bottom.

That allowed the label to wrap around the top so it could be seen from above. It included a flat surface that customers found easier to read than the curve of a typical pill bottle, and it came with color-coded rings for the neck to help family members quickly tell their medicines apart. Deborah Adler devised the new approach as part of her master’s thesis at New York’s School of Visual Arts. She was inspired to try something different after her grandmother mistakenly took her grandfather’s prescription. Adler now runs her own design business and is working with CVS on its new prescription system.

The red bottles were important to Christina Mihalek, of Cincinnati, because she accidentally took her mom’s high blood pressure medicine instead of an antibiotic when she was in high school, and she passed out in the lunch line that day. Mihalek took to Twitter to voice her displeasure, telling CVS in a post with the hashtag #redbottlesrock that “perfection was at your fingertips.”

Shelley Ewalt of Princeton, New Jersey, also tweeted to the drugstore chain, asking if there was any chance they might return to the “vastly superior design” of the Target bottles, which she found easier to open.

Woonsocket, Rhode Island-based CVS Health Corp., which runs the nation’s second-largest drugstore chain, started operating Target pharmacies earlier this year as part of a $1.9-billion deal the companies announced in 2015.

CVS’s Castel said the company stopped using Minneapolis-based Target Corp.’s bottles because it’s more efficient to fill prescriptions with the same bottle at all of its 9,600 pharmacies.

Customer visits to Target’s in-store pharmacies slipped in the second quarter. Castel said CVS doesn’t see a connection between that and the change in prescription bottles.

But the bottle switch might have influenced a small percentage of customers to shop elsewhere, according to Marshal Cohen, chief retail analyst with market researcher NPD Group. He said the second quarter was tough for many retailers, but he also noted that regular customers to pharmacies don’t like change.

“When you start tinkering with things … the consumer kind of gets a little testy,” he said.

Patients can buy prescription bottle caps that glow or beep when it’s time to take their medicine. But Purdue University pharmacy professor Alan Zillich hasn’t seen much of an evolution in the design of pill containers used by pharmacies because it just isn’t worth it, financially.

“Even though drugs cost a lot, pharmacies don’t make much off each individual prescription,” he said.

Sawyer still holds out hope that any new system CVS adopts might include features from the old Target bottles to replace the amber bottles, which she describes as a “ghastly” leftover from the 1950s.

“Everyone else uses the same stupid bottle,” she said.

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Trump says he may bring up Bill Clinton’s affairs in the next debate http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/trump-says-he-may-bring-up-bill-clintons-affairs-in-the-next-debate/ http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/trump-says-he-may-bring-up-bill-clintons-affairs-in-the-next-debate/#comments Tue, 27 Sep 2016 14:52:26 +0000 http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/trump-says-he-may-bring-up-bill-clintons-affairs-in-the-next-debate/ HEMPSTEAD, N.Y. — Donald Trump on Tuesday insisted that Hillary Clinton did not get under his skin during their first debate and suggested he may “hit her harder” in their next encounter by raising the subject of former President Bill Clinton’s infidelities.

“I really eased up because I didn’t want to hurt anyone’s feelings,” Trump said on Fox News, saying he would have brought up “the many affairs that Bill Clinton had,” but held back because the Clintons’ daughter Chelsea was in the audience.

“I didn’t think it was worth the shot,” he said. “I didn’t think it was nice.”

But such a strategy could further open Trump to blows from Clinton over his personal life, including comments seen as deeply degrading to women.

After spending much of Monday night on the defensive, the GOP presidential nominee maintained that his rival did not unnerve him. “No, not at all,” he said. “I didn’t see it that way.”

But he allowed that he was irritated “at the end, maybe” when Clinton brought up Trump’s treatment of Alicia Machado, a woman from Venezuela who was crowned the 1996 Miss Universe at age 19.

“She was the worst we ever had,” Trump said on Fox News’ “Fox and Friends”, adding: “She gained a massive amount of weight, and it was a real problem.”

The Clinton campaign, meanwhile, moved quickly to capitalize on the issue, releasing a web video featuring Machado, who said Trump called her “Miss Piggy” and “Miss Housekeeping.”

The ad also features footage from the 1990s of Trump saying in an interview that Machado went from 117 or 118 pounds to 160 or 170 and commenting: “So this is somebody that likes to eat.”

Sen. Tim Kaine of Virginia, Clinton’s running mate, told “CBS This Morning” that the night showed Trump can be “easily rattled.”

“That was very, very apparent throughout the debate,” he said. “And the longer the debate went on, the more apparent that was.”

The clash came at a critical juncture in the campaign. With six weeks until Election Day, and with voters in some states already starting to cast ballots, polls show Clinton’s summer lead has all but evaporated. Trump is effectively tied in many of the battleground states where Clinton had enjoyed comfortable leads.

For his part, Trump said he was pleased with the points he made on immigration, trade and jobs in the first half hour of the debate. He gave his Democratic rival a “C plus” when asked to grade her performance, but declined to grade himself, saying: “I know I did better than Hillary.”

Despite his apparent sniffles throughout the night, Trump said he did not have a cold or allergies. He blamed the noises on his microphone, which he said could not be heard well in the room.

“I don’t want to believe in conspiracy theories, of course,” Trump said. “But it was much lower than hers, and it was crackling.”

During the 95-minute debate at Hofstra University on Long Island, Trump unrelentingly blamed the nation’s chronic problems on Clinton as a “typical politician.” Yet he found himself mostly on the ropes as she denounced him for racial insensitivity, hiding potential conflicts of interest and “stiffing” those who helped build his business empire.

After circling each other for months, Clinton and Trump finally took the stage together for the first time, and each tried in a series of combative, acrimonious exchanges to discredit the other.

Trump spent much of the evening explaining himself – about his temperament, treatment of women and minorities, business practices and readiness to be commander in chief, as well as over his long perpetuation of a falsehood about Barack Obama’s birthplace to delegitimize his presidency.

“He has a long record of engaging in racist behavior, and the birther lie was a very hurtful one,” said Clinton, the Democratic nominee. “Barack Obama is a man of great dignity, and I could tell how much it bothered him and annoyed him that this was being touted and used against him.”

Trump, who earlier this month at last acknowledged Obama’s birth in Hawaii, replied by invoking Clinton’s 2008 rivalry with Obama: “When you try to act holier than thou, it really doesn’t work.”

In an earlier exchange, Clinton said it was unfortunate that Trump paints a dire picture of the livelihoods and economic circumstances of many African Americans. Trump groaned in apparent disgust.

The television networks were preparing for as many as 100 million people to watch, which would put Monday night’s debate in the pantheon of the Super Bowl.

Both candidates delivered performances likely to please and energize their core supporters. Clinton eviscerated Trump’s character and record while championing progressive ideals. Trump directly confronted Clinton over her email scandal and general trustworthiness. Less certain was how the debate might shape the perceptions of the slivers of the electorate still up for grabs, especially college-educated white women.

Clinton poured forth with policy details and practiced catch phrases – “Trumped-up trickle down” to describe his tax plan, for instance – and tried to sow doubts about the seriousness of Trump’s proposals. She seized on his comments about Russian President Vladimir Putin to suggest that Trump does not understand the global threats the country faces.

Where Clinton was measured in her attacks, Trump was a feisty and sometimes undisciplined aggressor. He regularly interrupted Clinton, as well as the moderator, “NBC Nightly News” anchor Lester Holt, and raised his voice. At times, Trump delivered rambling, heated and defensive answers.

Despite evidence to the contrary, Trump vehemently denied he had supported the Iraq War at the outset, as Clinton had, while Clinton looked on incredulously. Trump sought to blame Clinton for the growth of the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria, snapping, “You were secretary of state when it was a little infant.”

Clinton mocked Trump’s discussion of national security, suggesting he is uninformed and even unstable. “Whoo,” she said with a laugh, when Trump finished one oration about NATO and the Islamic State.

Earlier, Trump grew visibly frustrated by Clinton’s critique of his economic plan and declared: “Typical politician. All talk. No action. Sounds good. Doesn’t work. Never gonna happen. Our country is suffering because people like Secretary Clinton have made such bad decisions in terms of our jobs, in terms of what’s going on.”

Trump, whose pugilistic aggression made him a dominant force in the Republican primary debates, began the first general-election debate with an uncharacteristically respectful tone. He ditched his campaign trail nickname of “Crooked Hillary” to call his opponent “Secretary Clinton.”

“Is that okay?” he asked her. Clinton smiled. “Good,” Trump continued. “I want you to be very happy. It’s very important to me.”

But Trump’s demeanor quickly grew more aggressive, even bitter. He tried to portray Clinton as a relic of Washington and protector of the status quo. In one of his few dominant moments, he challenged Clinton on trade policy, saying the North American Free Trade Agreement and other trade pacts have contributed to the hollowing-out of America’s middle class.

“Your husband signed NAFTA, which was one of the worst things that ever happened to the manufacturing industry,” Trump said to Clinton. “You go to New England, you go to Ohio, you go to Pennsylvania – you go anywhere you want Secretary Clinton and you will see devastation.”

Trump added: “You’ve been doing this for 30 years. Why are you just thinking about these solutions right now?”

Near the end of the debate, Trump repeated his claim that Clinton lacks what he sees as “the presidential look.”

“She doesn’t have the look. . . . She doesn’t have the stamina,” Trump said.

Clinton looked at him with a smile, laughing.

“As soon as he travels to 112 countries,” Clinton said, “he can talk to me about stamina.”

That line drew loud applause in the hall.

Clinton continued. She said that Trump had tried to change the conversation from her “look” to whether she had stamina.

“This is a man who has called women pigs, slobs and dogs,” Clinton said. “One of the worst things he said was about a woman in a beauty contest. He loves beauty contests, supporting them and hanging around them. He called this woman ‘Miss Piggy,’ and then he called her ‘Miss Housekeeping,’ because she is Latina,” Clinton said. “She has a name, Donald.”

Trump countered by suggesting that he had considered delving into the Clinton family’s tawdry past on the debate stage. Over the weekend Trump had threatened to invite Gennifer Flowers, one of Bill Clinton’s former mistresses, to attend the debate.

“I was going to say something extremely tough to Hillary, to her family, and I said, ‘I just can’t do it,’ ” Trump said.

Clinton accused Trump of postponing the release of his tax returns – something every presidential nominee has done for decades – because he has something to hide. Trump has said he is keeping his returns private on the advice of his lawyers because he is under federal audit.

Clinton speculated that Trump was “hiding” his tax returns because they would show he is not as rich as he says he is, or is not as charitable as he claims, or has debts to major banks and foreign entities, or pays nothing in taxes at all.

At that last suggestion, Trump scoffed, “That makes me smart.”

Trump countered by offering to release his taxes if Clinton agreed to release her missing 33,000 emails. “I think it’s disgraceful,” Trump said of her use of a private email server as secretary of state. “And believe me, this country really thinks it’s disgraceful also.”

Clinton said, “I made a mistake using a private email.”

“That’s for sure,” Trump interjected.

“I don’t make any excuses,” she continued.

With her concise answer, Clinton avoided the lawyerly details that have usually accompanied her discussion of the email issue, which her campaign staff has warned her sounds to voters like she is splitting hairs.

From the beginning, Clinton’s strategy seemed in part to be to goad Trump to respond intemperately. Early on, she reminded the audience that “Donald was very fortunate,” to the tune of what she said was a $14 million loan from Trump’s father. Her father was a small-business man, Clinton added.

Trump, who is famously sensitive to suggestions that he owes his success to anyone else, took the bait. He used part of his next chance to speak to say he had received only a “small loan.”

The exchange may seem petty, but it invokes central themes of the election, including the economic health of the middle class and which candidate is on the side of the little guy.

Clinton continued to press that case, charging that Trump took advantage of his workers and contractors who helped build his real estate assets.

“I have met a lot of the people who were stiffed by you and your businesses, Donald,” she said. “I’ve met dishwashers, painters, architects, glass installers, marble installers, drapery installers, like my dad was, who you refused to pay when they finished the work that you asked them to do.”

Clinton cited an architect who designed the clubhouse at one of his golf courses yet was not paid all he was owed. Trump retorted: “Maybe he didn’t do a good job and I was unsatisfied with his work.”

Trump went on to laud the achievements of his company, repeatedly saying his success reflects the kind of the thinking the nation needed in its political leaders.

In another exchange, Trump seemed rattled as Clinton accused him of saying that climate change “is a hoax, perpetrated by the Chinese.”

“I do not say that, I do not say that,” Trump interjected, shaking his head – though he has done so several times.

This was the first of three debates between Clinton and Trump sponsored by the nonpartisan Commission on Presidential Debates; the other two are Oct. 9 in St. Louis and Oct. 19 in Las Vegas. The vice-presidential nominees, Democrat Tim Kaine and Republican Mike Pence, will face off once, on Oct. 4 in Farmville, Va.

The third-party candidates did not qualify to participate in the debate because they did not meet a minimum polling threshold. Libertarian Party nominee Gary Johnson, who is positioned to be a potential spoiler in many states, and Green Party nominee Jill Stein both made appearances on campus Monday for media interviews. Stein staged a protest and at one point was ushered off campus by security because she did not have necessary credentials.

The Washington Post’s Jenna Johnson in Hempstead, N.Y. contributed to this report.

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Sanford man charged with firing gun from motel balcony http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/sanford-man-charged-after-firing-gun-from-motel-balcony/ http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/sanford-man-charged-after-firing-gun-from-motel-balcony/#comments Tue, 27 Sep 2016 14:12:26 +0000 http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/sanford-man-charged-after-firing-gun-from-motel-balcony/ A Sanford man was arrested Tuesday morning after allegedly firing a gun from a motel balcony.

Matthew Chapman

Matthew Chapman

Police were called to the Oakwood Inn and Motel at 945 Main St. just after 1:20 a.m. for a report of gunshots in the area. When officers arrived, they heard gunshots and found evidence of a handgun being fired from a second-story balcony at the motel.

No one was injured in the incident.

Matthew Chapman, 30, who was in the room, was arrested on a charge of reckless conduct with a dangerous weapon, a Class C felony.

He was taken to York County Jail in Alfred, where he was released after posting $500 cash bail.

Police obtained a search warrant for the motel room and found a .38-caliber handgun and ammunition.

Anyone who witnessed the incident is asked to call Detective Eric Small at 324-9170, ext. 227.

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Low water pressure in Portland caused by water main break http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/water-pressure-in-portland-affected-by-gorham-water-main-break/ http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/water-pressure-in-portland-affected-by-gorham-water-main-break/#comments Tue, 27 Sep 2016 13:09:39 +0000 http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/water-pressure-in-portland-affected-by-gorham-water-main-break/ The Portland Water District is reporting a water main break that is affecting water pressure throughout its service area.

The break is being repaired, according to a tweet from the water district just before 9 a.m.

The break occurred in Gorham.

This story will be updated.

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Trump suggests he was given a bad microphone http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/trump-suggests-he-was-given-bad-microphone/ http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/trump-suggests-he-was-given-bad-microphone/#comments Tue, 27 Sep 2016 11:53:02 +0000 http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/trump-suggests-he-was-given-bad-microphone/ WASHINGTON — Donald Trump is floating the theory that debate moderators gave him a bad microphone on purpose.

Trump says his mic at Monday’s debate was “terrible.” He’s blaming it for what some listeners thought were sniffles by Trump during the debate.

Trump said Tuesday on “Fox and Friends” that it was going on and off and that his volume was lower than Hillary Clinton’s microphone.

Trump tells Fox News he wonders “whether that wasn’t set up that way on purpose.” He says “I don’t want to believe in conspiracy theories, but it was much lower than hers.”

Trump campaign manager Kellyann Conway told CNN that she heard from audience members that his mic sounded off. She said that from where she sat backstage, the mic sounded fine.

On an issue that came up in the debate, Trump responded to Clinton’s reference to 1996 Miss Universe Alicia Machado’s claim that Trump called her “Miss Piggy” when she gained weight.

Trump told “Fox and Friends” on Tuesday that Machado was “the worst we ever had,” referring to past winners of the pageant.

Trump says, “She gained a massive amount of weight. It was a real problem. We had a real problem.”

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Analysis: Did Trump really just suggest that China should invade North Korea? http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/analysis-did-trump-really-just-suggest-that-china-should-invade-north-korea/ http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/analysis-did-trump-really-just-suggest-that-china-should-invade-north-korea/#comments Tue, 27 Sep 2016 10:47:12 +0000 http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/analysis-did-trump-really-just-suggest-that-china-should-invade-north-korea/ TOKYO — How do you solve a problem like North Korea? It’s a problem that has befuddled American presidents for decades.

Well, Donald Trump, has a new idea. In the first debate Monday night, the Republican candidate appeared to suggest that China should invade North Korea.

“You look at North Korea, we’re doing nothing there,” Trump said when asked about his policy on nuclear weapons during the debate. “China should solve that problem for us. China should go into North Korea. China is totally powerful as it relates to North Korea.”

The idea that China – once North Korea’s patron, now the closest thing it has to a friend (and it’s not that close) – has leverage over North Korea is not new.

Pyongyang’s nuclear tests are routinely met with condemnation then sanctions through the United Nations aimed at cutting off the regime’s ability to get parts for its weapons program or earn the money needed to finance it. After this month’s nuclear test, there were calls across the spectrum for China to get serious about imposing international sanctions on the North.

The sanctions are not effective unless Beijing fully implements them, cracking down on the Chinese intermediaries that do business with North Korea.

Beijing has become increasingly angry during Kim Jong Un’s reign and has supported increasingly stringent sanctions, but analysts say its ultimate consideration has not changed: it does not want the regime to collapse, sending millions of hungry North Koreans into China and, potentially, the 28,000 American troops stationed in South Korea right up to its border.

But Trump’s suggestion that China “go into” North Korea took the exhortations for Beijing to act to a whole new level and is a bit of contrast to his own suggestions over the summer. Remember that back in June, Trump suggested he would deal with North Korea by inviting Kim Jong Un to Washington – but not for a state dinner, just for hamburgers around a conference table.

On Twitter, there was widespread disbelief at the idea that a military invasion was the answer.

Indeed, analysts poured cold water on the very idea that leaning on China was a new strategy.

“Has the Bush administration not tried to use Chinese leverage to control Pyongyang? Has not the Obama administration?” Eom Sang-yoon, a research fellow at the Sejong Institute told the NK News website.

“What is Trump saying is very basic, so far he has not provided any details on how his policy will be different from that of Obama.”

But the Republican candidate didn’t just stop at China. He criticized the Obama administration’s nuclear agreement with Iran as “the worst deal I think I’ve ever seen negotiated.”

Cracking down on North Korea should have been made part of that deal, Trump said.

“Iran is one of their biggest trading partners. Iran has power over North Korea,” Trump said. “When they made that horrible deal with Iran, they should have included the fact that they do something with respect to North Korea.”

That claim had Iran experts scratching their heads.

Trump also took the opportunity to again insist that Japan and South Korea – both American allies – should be paying more for their defense.

“Just to go down the list, we defend Japan, we defend Germany, we defend South Korea, we defend Saudi Arabia, we defend countries. They do not pay us,” he said.

“But they should be paying us, because we are providing tremendous service and we’re losing a fortune,” saying that “we are losing billions and billions of dollars.”

“This isn’t 40 years ago where we could do what we’re doing. We can’t defend Japan, a behemoth, selling us cars by the million,” he said.

In fact, these countries do pay for their own defense. Japan pays almost $2 billion a year to host American troops on its soil, while South Korea pays about $850 million annually.

This is how one former Republican spokesman on the Hill, Brian Walsh, responded, tweeting:

“Korea actually pays hundreds of millions of dollars a year for our military. Trump knows that. Still lied. https://t.co/FPGEDuH5T6

In Seoul, the government broke with normal diplomatic protocol to rebut Trump’s remarks.

“Our government normally considers it inappropriate to comment on remarks by a particular [American] presidential candidate,” Cho June-hyuck, spokesman at the Foreign Ministry, said at a press briefing.

“Nevertheless… I can say that our government has contributed to and played a role in maintaining and strengthening the combined defense capability of South Korea and the U.S. as well as stably stationing U.S. Forces Korea here,” the spokesman said, according to a report from the Yonhap News Agency.

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Reaction from around the world to first presidential debate http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/reaction-from-around-the-world-to-first-presidential-debate/ http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/reaction-from-around-the-world-to-first-presidential-debate/#comments Tue, 27 Sep 2016 10:14:30 +0000 http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/reaction-from-around-the-world-to-first-presidential-debate/ Views from around the world on Monday’s first U.S. presidential debate between Democrat Hillary Clinton and Republican Donald Trump:

CHINA

WANG PEI, a graduate student in communications studies, was watching the debate from a cafe in Beijing and said he thought Clinton carried herself better.

“I personally like Trump’s character and the feeling that he’s a fighter,” Wang said. “But from today’s performance, I think Clinton was more like a mature politician and Trump looked a bit like a misfit in this kind of setting.”

Asked if he hoped that China would someday see its political candidates engage in similar debates, he said: “I don’t expect China to copy the U.S., or become a counterpart of the U.S.

“I hope China will find its own way of sustainable development instead of following the example of the U.S., as long as this way can give us good lives,” Wang said.

GE MENGCHAO, a graduate student in journalism, said he thought Trump would be a friendlier president to China because his business background could mean he would appreciate the countries’ commercial ties.

“I think maybe Trump would be friendlier to China, because China and the U.S. share vast common interests, especially in commercial areas,” Ge said. “From the perspective of a businessman, he may take a friendlier approach to China.”

AUSTRALIA

MILTON GAN, a Sydney-based photographer, said it seemed like Trump was trying to rein in his temper for the first 15 minutes, then went off the rails.

“He started interrupting Clinton, he started interrupting (moderator) Lester (Holt) and he started steamrolling. And you could see he was just getting really irate about everything,” Gan said.

“The most ridiculous thing was at the end when he said he had the better temperament to be president,” Gan said, laughing. “It was just hilarious.”

Clinton came off prepared, confident and composed, Gan said: “Obviously, she’s done her prep and she’s got so much experience in politics and I think that really showed.”

RICHARD MCCONOCHIE, 57, watched the debate on a big screen in a Canberra pub and said, “To me Trump aced it.”

“He came across as a man who could control himself. They said Trump’s ignorant of the issues. I think he proved that he had at least a working handle on most of the stuff he was talking about.”

“I think he’ll swing a lot of Americans over to Trump just by proving that he is not the sort of unstable, dangerous lunatic that he’s painted to be,” McConochie said. “I don’t see that Trump would be any more incompetent than Clinton.”

PAUL SMITH, 56, at the same pub, was disappointed Trump had not done better.

“He just really didn’t come up with the goods today. He hasn’t done his homework as much as she had. She was just so confident, so knowledgeable, looking so healthy, relaxed and delivered. And he didn’t have the comeback, didn’t have the punches.”

“I think he should be given a go. I think it’s business as usual with Hillary, it’s just a continuation of what Obama’s up to.”

JAPAN

NARUSHIGE MICHISHITA, a Japanese analyst, said it was in some ways heartening to hear his country mentioned in the debate, since Japan is often overlooked these days. But he disagreed with Trump’s criticism that Japan and other U.S. allies aren’t contributing enough to their defense.

“There is a small truth to what Mr. Trump was saying, in the sense that Japan was a kind of free-rider or at least a cheap-rider back in the 1970s and ’80s,” said Michishita, director of the security and international studies program at the National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies in Tokyo.

“But … now given what Prime Minister (Shinzo) Abe is doing to make Japan much more proactive on defense and security matters, and trying to make Japan more engaged in international security affairs, it’s like, ‘What are you talking about?'”

HIROTSUGU AIDA, author of a book on the Trump phenomenon, agreed that Trump misunderstood the U.S.-Japan security alliance but said he still did better than Clinton.

“Trump unexpectedly acted presidential. It might be a setback for Clinton who wanted to make him look unsuitable for presidency,” he said. “Clinton could not successfully distinguish herself as a mature politician from Trump the amateur in politics … It may sound a bit too strong but I would say Trump won.”

Aida, a professor of global studies at Aoyama Gakuin University in Tokyo, said Trump avoided making gaffes and meaningless criticism against Japan on trade issues, going after China and Mexico instead.

PHILIPPINES

VICTOR ANDRES MANHIT, president of the think-tank Albert del Rosario Institute for Strategic and International Studies, welcomed Clinton’s assurances that the U.S. would honor its treaty obligations if she becomes president.

“I’m really hoping that that kind of statement reminds our own government that we have an ally in the United States vis-a-vis our fight for territorial integrity and our maritime rights in the South China Sea,” he said.

RICHARD HEYDARIAN, a political science professor at Manila’s De La Salle University said he thought Clinton “was clearly the more prepared candidate and was able to handle Trump’s offensives with utmost finesse. Trump seemed more subdued than expected, but spent too much time defending himself on secondary issues and failed to build up on his vision for the American people, especially the middle classes. …

“She clearly was more commander-in-chief material today than her main rival, who forwarded a more disengaged and isolationist America that is ‘not the global policeman’ and more concerned with its narrow national interests,” Heydarian said.

INDIA

MANJEET KRIPALANI, executive director of the Mumbai-based foreign policy think tank Gateway House, said there were “no surprises.”

“Both candidates were authentically who they are. She, the sophisticated, career politician. Donald Trump, the brash entrepreneur who people relate to,” she said.

Kripalani views Trump as a greater potential force for change in Washington’s relationship with India and its rival Pakistan.

“Hillary Clinton is a status quoist. Where America’s relationship with Pakistan is concerned or in other ways she won’t change the status quo,” she said. “Donald Trump may have some surprises in terms of how America views Pakistan. Trump has said that the existing world alliances don’t work for America.

“He’s created an opening for countries like India to step in and negotiate a new world order.”

SOUTH KOREA

CHO JUNE-HYUCK, Foreign Ministry spokesman, said it would be inappropriate for the Seoul government to respond to comments made by U.S. presidential candidates in the run-up to the vote. Trump said during the debate that South Korea should burden larger costs for the U.S. troops stationed in the peninsula, and that the United States should let China to have a larger role in controlling the actions of North Korea.

Cho said the Seoul government is closely monitoring the election, and that South Korea has been doing its part to strengthen the combined defense force between the countries and create a stable environment for the stationed U.S. soldiers. He said Seoul and Washington are holding a variety of talks on different levels to deal with the North Korean nuclear threat.

AP journalists Wayne Zhang and Wong Wai-bor in Beijing; Kristen Gelineau in Sydney; Rod McGuirk in Canberra, Australia; Ken Moritsugu and Mari Yamaguchi in Tokyo; Teresa Cerojano in Manila, Philippines; Muneeza Naqvi in New Delhi; and Kim Tong-Hyung in Seoul, South Korea, contributed to this report.

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Sun this afternoon, but prolonged dreary pattern is on the way http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/morning-showers-ending-unsettled-period-weather-beginning/ http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/morning-showers-ending-unsettled-period-weather-beginning/#comments Tue, 27 Sep 2016 10:11:45 +0000 http://www.pressherald.com/?p=1078108 A cold front sweeping through the area today will bring showers this morning, but the fast nature of the front means clearing will take place in the afternoon along with some sunshine.   Some areas could see as much as half an inch of rain while others only receive a 10th of an inch.

After the showers end this morning it will be quite mild with some sunny breaks possible.

After the showers end this morning it will be quite mild with some sunny breaks possible.

The sunshine this afternoon is going to be welcome, but not long-lasting.  The weather pattern becomes stuck for the rest of the week and into the weekend.  We certainly haven’t seen much in the way of constantly poor weather for a long time.  Unfortunately, the lack of sunshine won’t be accompanied by much in the way of rain.  As a matter of fact, it’s not going to surprise me if the rain this morning is the most rain we see the rest of the week.

The next time I see showers to possibly be widespread is Friday.  We need rain badly and while temperatures have cooled significantly, the drought is still in full force.  Droughts in the fall can still have tremendous impact.  If we don’t see much rain before the ground freezes, the damage to plants during the winter could be quite bad.

The upcoming cloudy and damp pattern will last through the week, with possible sunshine returning late in the weekend or early next week.

The reason for the lack of sunshine this week will be a storm rotating in place to our south.  The GIF below shows the bulk of the rainfall with this system remaining south of Maine, but there will likely be an increase in showers Friday or early Saturday.  Clouds will definitely dominate the skies, especially south of Augusta, the remainder of the week.   Even by the weekend this weather system may still be plaguing the area.

It’s been a very sunny spring, summer and first week of fall, but at least temporarily that is about to change.

A weather system will rotate to the south Maine much of the rest of the week.

A weather system will rotate to the south Maine much of the rest of the week.

You can follow my weather updates on Twitter at @growingwisdom.

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On the Job: Devon Wright travels far to pick apples http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/job-devon-wright-travels-far-pick-apples/ http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/job-devon-wright-travels-far-pick-apples/#comments Tue, 27 Sep 2016 08:00:08 +0000 http://www.pressherald.com/?p=1077420 “We make excellent cider at Giles Family Farm, real good cider, tops,” said Devon Wright.

Wright picks apples in the orchard at Giles Family Farm in Alfred.

Wright, 53, of the Parish of Manchester, Jamaica, has been picking apples in Alfred for 16 seasons. He is one of four migrant apple pickers from Jamaica who are working in Alfred this season.

The workers keep on the move, up and down ladders, while filling a picking bucket with apples. They average about 75 to 100 bushels a day.

“It pays good in comparison to my salary back home,” said Wright, his voice thick with the sound of his Jamaica home. Wright raises cattle in Jamaica when he’s not working in Maine.

“In three months you could earn $6,000 or $7,000,” he said of the job in Alfred.

That pay is one favorite part of the job, along with apple cider.

The hardest part of the job for him is working when the weather turns cold.

“In Jamaica it’s T-shirt weather all year long,” he said.

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Maine lobstermen’s group weighs in on death of entangled whale http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/maine-lobstermens-group-weighs-in-on-death-of-entangled-whale/ http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/maine-lobstermens-group-weighs-in-on-death-of-entangled-whale/#comments Tue, 27 Sep 2016 08:00:00 +0000 http://www.pressherald.com/?p=1077975 The death of a 45-ton right whale found entangled in fishing line about 12 miles off the Maine coast over the weekend has caught the attention of the Maine lobster industry even though it’s not clear whether the whale’s demise was related to lobster fishing. The right whale is endangered and protected by the federal government.

Patrice McCarron, executive director of the Maine Lobstermen’s Association, said preliminary indications appear to show that the ropes found on the whale were much larger than those typically used by lobstermen. The larger ropes would instead more often be found in deep-sea fishing, she said.

Jennifer Goebel, a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration spokeswoman, said many aspects of the adult female whale’s death are still being investigated, including tracing the fishing gear to an owner, if possible.

Right whales have been listed as an endangered species since 1970, and one of the greatest threats to their survival is fishing gear entanglement.

Goebel said that even though the whale was found in Maine, it could have become entangled anywhere in its habitat in the Atlantic Ocean up and down the U.S. and Canadian coasts before dying off the Maine coast. A necropsy was performed Sunday at a Gorham farm, which will compost the carcass.

“There’s obviously a lot of things that we are still investigating,” Goebel said.

Much of the lobster harvest occurs outside the right whale’s habitat, McCarron said.

About 80 percent of lobstermen stay within 3 miles of the Maine coastline, because that’s where the lobsters migrate to in prime lobster season, roughly from July through November, she said.

Right whales usually don’t get that close to the shoreline, McCarron said, which is why 70 percent of lobster harvesting waters within 3 miles of the coast are exempt from 2009 federal fishing regulations aimed at protecting the whales.

The right whale population has rebounded since the 1990s, from less than 300 to the most recent estimate of 476 in 2014, according to NOAA.

Amy Knowlton, a research scientist with the New England Aquarium, said in an email that right whales had “some good calving years in the early 2000s” that led to population increases after “lackluster” calving in the 1990s that may have been caused by disease or food scarcity.

Knowlton said, however, that danger signs such as fewer births and more frequent entanglements have emerged in recent years and could cause the population to plummet again.

“Changes to the (fishing) industry haven’t yet fixed the problem,” she said.

The federal regulations enacted in 2009 require lobstermen to use ground lines that sink to the ocean floor and thus stay out of the way of the whales, instead of floating ground lines that stay on top of the water and can entangle whales.

Lobstermen who want to fish in non-exempt zones have to spend between $7,000 and $10,000 for the sinking ground lines, which have to be replaced every year or two. Floating lines could last about a decade before needing to be replaced, McCarron said.

“It’s a very significant investment,” she said.

Aside from an unknown number of lobstermen who fish in the 30 percent of waters within 3 miles of the coastline that are subject to the federal regulations, McCarron said 1,200 to 1,400 of the more than 7,000 licensed lobstermen have licenses that allow them to go farther than 3 miles offshore to fish for lobsters. However, it’s unclear how many of them actually use the licenses allowing them to fish that far out.

From 2009 to 2013, there were an average of 3.4 right whale entanglements per year in the Atlantic, according to an NOAA study.

“It’s hard to say whether the regulations put in place have made a difference or not,” said Lynda Doughty, executive director of Marine Mammals of Maine, who helped coordinate Sunday’s necropsy.

McCarron said there is little information about how or why the right whales become entangled.

“We really don’t know,” McCarron said. “If fixes need to be made, we want to make the right changes that will truly make a difference.”

McCarron also said that Canadian lobstermen don’t have to follow the same rules protecting whales as U.S. lobstermen.

The Maine Marine Patrol and Coast Guard took turns towing the 45-ton, 43-foot whale to Portland, needing 12 hours to make the trip from where the whale was found Friday off Boothbay Harbor, Doughty said. She estimated that the whale had been dead less than a week when the whale watchers spotted it.

She said the whale was much larger than expected, and it took several attempts before finding a flatbed truck capable of transporting the whale to Benson Farm in Gorham, where the necropsy took place.

A team of 20 scientists from various organizations that conduct whale research worked all day Sunday to take tissue and organ samples to be sent to a pathology lab.

Ed Benson, owner of Benson Farm, which is licensed to accept marine mammals for necropsies and for composting, said the remains of the whale are now being composted and will eventually be sold in Benson Farm’s Surf and Turf soil amendment.

“Composting a whale is the same process that we use for everything else, only bigger,” he said.

 

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Deceased whale was young, in reproductive stage and had been tracked for a decade http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/deceased-whale-was-young-in-reproductive-stage-and-had-been-tracked-for-a-decade/ http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/deceased-whale-was-young-in-reproductive-stage-and-had-been-tracked-for-a-decade/#comments Tue, 27 Sep 2016 08:00:00 +0000 http://www.pressherald.com/?p=1077954 The right whale that died in the waters off Maine in recent days had no name, but rather a number – 3694 – given to her by researchers at the New England Aquarium, who track this endangered species in the North Atlantic.

She was young, just coming into her reproductive years and had tangled with fishing gear once before, sometime in the past four years.

Since she was first spotted in 2006, 3694 had been seen and identified 26 times – eight times from vessels, the rest from the air, either from planes or drones. Before the crew on a whale-watching trip out of Boothbay spotted her, floating on the surface and wrapped in fishing gear ropes Friday, the last time anyone had made a positive identification of 3694 was in Florida waters. That was Feb. 12. At that time she was swimming freely, unencumbered by any fishing line.

The New England Aquarium’s best guess on her age is that she was calved in 2005, making her 11½ at the time of her death. She was probably just entering her reproductive years – right whales begin to reproduce at age 10, and give birth every three to five years after that.

Because she was spotted in Florida, the largest calving ground for right whales, it’s possible she did give birth this year and lost the calf, but that’s just speculation. “We won’t be able to prove that she was pregnant,” said Amy Knowlton, research associate with the New England Aquarium.

She’d been sighted in Cape Cod Bay, the Great South Channel, the Gulf of Maine and farther out, in the mid-Atlantic. But very little was known about this whale.

“She was hard for us to match because she didn’t have distinctive scars or markings,” Knowlton said. “She was a tough one.”

She had a small white scar on her chin, and another near her left blowhole. They were minor. Sometime after 2012 she had a tussle with fishing line, which left a leading edge fluke scar. But it was minor.

Because of this lack of obvious identifiers, 3694 never got a name, which researchers give only when there is a feature on a whale that helps them identify the creature. (The number itself does not signify an overall count of North Atlantic right whales. There are now about 476 of them, scientists said.)

She’d never been darted to collect a tissue sample for genetic testing, a tool that whale researchers have been using since the late 1980s to determine the exact parentage of calves as well as their gender. Indeed, until the necropsy conducted at Benson Farm in Gorham over the weekend, not even 3694’s sex was known.

She weighed about 45 tons and was 43 feet long, big enough that a tractor-trailer was required to bring her from Portland – where a Coast Guard boat had towed her – to Gorham.

When the Cap’n Fish’s Whale Watching cruise out of Boothbay spotted 3694 at around 1:30 p.m. Friday, she was already dead. At first, they took her for a log. “They decided to go look closer,” said John Fish, owner of the popular whale-watching line. “It was a whale all wrapped up in fishing gear that it had been choked out. It is a sad way to die.”

There’s no doubt, Knowlton said, that she died from what is called “chronic entanglement” among whale researchers.

“It’s not a pretty ending,” Knowlton acknowledged. Number 3694 could have been wrapped in the line for months. It was in her mouth, so it’s possible she picked it up while feeding. Right whales are especially susceptible to such entanglements because they feed on plankton near the surface, swimming slowly with their mouths wide open.

“Clearly it got very wrapped up,” Knowlton said. “Ropes are very strong now and when (whales) can’t break through, they are going to continue to struggle. And that is what happened with her.”

Most of the right whales surveyed in the Bay of Fundy this summer had begun to leave by mid-September, so it’s likely that 3694 was on the move. The Boothbay region is not known as a high-use area for right whales, Knowlton said.

Although Fish said it has been a great year for whale-watching in general, with tourists enjoying up-close looks at humpbacks, minke, fin whales and even Sei whales, right whales have been conspicuously absent. “That was the only right whale we’ve seen in a long, long time,” Fish said.

He said the captain of the boat and the marine biologist who narrates during the cruise had told him that the whale had not started to give off odors and there were no obvious signs of shark damage to the corpse, suggesting the whale hadn’t been dead long. Last year when the crew spotted a humpback tangled in gear and called it in – the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has an emergency line for just such cases – a team was able to free the humpback.

There were no other whales around 3694 when she was spotted.

As an individual, 3694 may have lacked much of a profile; there was not even enough that was distinctive about her to go by a nickname – Chin Scar, for instance. But as part of the small collective of right whales and those who track them, her death will be felt as potential lost at sea, the potential to perpetuate the species by becoming a mother.

“She was just getting to that age,” Knowlton said. “That is why this is even more of a sad loss.”

 

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Poll shows strong voter support for Maine transportation bonds http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/poll-shows-strong-voter-support-for-transportation-bonds/ http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/poll-shows-strong-voter-support-for-transportation-bonds/#comments Tue, 27 Sep 2016 08:00:00 +0000 http://www.pressherald.com/?p=1077846 A majority of Maine voters favor issuing $100 million in bonds to improve transportation infrastructure, according to a new Portland Press Herald poll.

About 66 percent of likely voters said they would vote yes on Question 6 on the November ballot. Only 20 percent said they would vote no and 13 percent said they were undecided. The bond question includes $80 million to improve state highways and local bridges. The remaining $20 million would be spent on ports and marine transportation, aviation, railways, public transit, and bicycle and pedestrian trails. The money will match an estimated $137 million in federal and other funds. If approved, the state would have 10 years to issue the bonds.

The poll of 501 likely voters was conducted for the newspaper by the University of New Hampshire Survey Center between Sept. 15-20. The survey had a margin of error of 4.3 percentage points.

Results show the bond issue has strong support, between 56 percent and 75 percent, from a broad spectrum of voters. Respondents said they would vote to issue bonds regardless of gender, age, education, income level, geography, church attendance, gun ownership or length of time lived in the state.

Party affiliation was the only area with noticeable differences between likely voters over Question 6.

transportationAbout 81 percent of registered Democrats said they would vote yes on the bond question, compared to 49 percent of registered Republicans who said they would. An even wider gulf emerged depending on whom respondents supported for president. Nearly all, 87 percent, of Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton’s supporters said they would vote yes for the bonds, while only 46 percent of those backing Republican nominee Donald Trump said they would. About 41 percent of Trump supporters and 38 percent of registered Republicans said they would vote no on Question 6. Only 4 percent of Clinton supporters and 8 percent of registered Democrats said they would vote against the bonds.

Registered unenrolled voters, those with no party affiliation, were almost half of those polled. About 67 percent of those voters said they would vote yes on Question 6, compared to 18 percent who would vote no and 15 percent who were undecided.

The poll results are not surprising, considering the overwhelming support Maine voters have previously given to transportation bonds. Last year, 73 percent of voters approved $85 million in borrowing for transportation projects. In 2013, another $100 million transportation bond passed with 71 percent of the vote. A $51.5 million transportation bond passed with 70 percent of the vote in 2012.

 

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Most Mainers favor background checks on gun sales, poll shows http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/most-mainers-favor-background-checks-on-gun-sales/ http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/most-mainers-favor-background-checks-on-gun-sales/#comments Tue, 27 Sep 2016 08:00:00 +0000 http://www.pressherald.com/?p=1077822 More than 60 percent of Mainers support a ballot initiative that would require background checks prior to private gun sales, according to a Portland Press Herald poll.

With six weeks left before Election Day, the campaign to close what critics contend is a fatal loophole in Maine’s gun laws appears to be maintaining strong support among voters, particularly in the state’s more populous regions and among women.

Roughly 61 percent of survey participants said they supported Question 3 – which would require background checks prior to private, person-to-person gun sales – while 33 percent opposed the ballot measure. Six percent of the 509 people polled for the survey remained undecided.

The poll was conducted via calls to both landline and cellular telephones between Sept. 15-20 by the University of New Hampshire Survey Center. The background check poll had a margin of error of 4.3 percent.

Spearheaded by a local campaign largely financed by outside money, the Question 3 campaign would mandate background checks for all private sales, essentially applying the same standard now required of licensed gun shops and dealers. It also would require background checks before someone transferred or loaned a gun out.

The initiative contains exceptions for transactions between family members, to law enforcement or for some “temporary transfers” for hunting (but only when the gun owner is present) or when the transfer “is necessary to prevent imminent death or great bodily harm.”

Sellers and buyers would have to go to a licensed firearms dealer to have the buyer’s name run through the FBI’s National Instant Criminal Background Check System. Dealers can charge a “reasonable fee” to enter the data into the federal system.

Supporters contend the expansion is needed to close a loophole that allows people prohibited from owning guns – such as convicted felons or those with severe mental illnesses – to buy them without raising any red flags with law enforcement. Question 3’s supporters say the initiative also will reduce gun trafficking that helps fuel violence in cities in Massachusetts and other states with tighter gun laws.

Question 3’s opponents, meanwhile, argue the proposal is unnecessary in Maine, which ranks among the states with the lowest rates of gun violence. Additionally, opponents contend that requiring background checks for gun loans among friends will only cause headaches for law-abiding citizens without affecting criminals intent on skirting the law.

Mark Brewer, a political science professor at the University of Maine, called the 61 percent “a very strong percentage” but somewhat lower than he would have expected given previous polling in Maine and nationally showing strong support for expanded background checks.

Brewer speculated that recent television ads by the National Rifle Association may be having an impact. But he projected that Question 3 will pass in November because expanding background checks has enjoyed strong support, including among many gun owners.

“I wouldn’t be surprised to see a similar decline in support as it gets closer to Election Day,” Brewer said. “That being said, I think there is a floor on (the decline). And I think that floor is well short of the referendum failing.”

The Press Herald poll showed that support for Question 3 was strongest among Democrats (87 percent), non-gun owners (84 percent) and women (72 percent). Nearly three-quarters of southern Maine residents polled on the issue said they planned to vote for the expansion, compared to just 49 percent in northern Maine.

A majority of likely voters in both congressional districts said they supported the initiative: 69 percent in the more liberal 1st District and 52 percent in Maine’s more rural, conservative 2nd District.

But just 41 percent of self-identified gun owners planned to vote for Question 3, lower than other state and national polls suggesting a majority of gun owners supported expanded background checks.

Donald Shaw, a 61-year-old Searsport resident, is among those who fear the proposal simply goes too far, especially when it comes to gun transfers.

Shaw said he and his family or friends often exchange guns for hunting. While Question 3 would allow gun owners to loan a gun to a non-relative, the two would have to hunt together or else receive a background check prior to the transfer. Shaw said the language of the legislation can be read in different ways, adding “I’m not going to take the risk of being charged” for a violation.

“I’m a former police officer, retired now, so I don’t want bad people to have guns,” Shaw said. “But I don’t believe this is going to change anything.”

Other gun owners, such as Steve Gerhartz, have a different take on the issue. Gerhartz said he believes passage of Question 3 would “enhance the depth” of the system and that it was “a reasonable thing to do” to put additional hurdles or barriers in front of those who shouldn’t possess guns.

“It closes some loopholes. This isn’t about confiscating anybody’s weapons,” said Gerhartz, an NRA member living in Kittery Point.

Likewise, Claire Hersom of Winthrop said that while no system is failsafe, she believed the initiative will help make Mainers safer. Hersom, 67, said she comes from a hunting family and grew up at a time when many of her friends brought their rifles to school so they could hunt afterward. But society has changed and she believes background checks make sense.

“It feels as if there has been almost this propaganda campaign to make people fear that their guns are going to be taken away when that is not the goal,” Hersom said. “The goal is simply for background checks.”

Maine has a thriving private-sales market for guns, often through classified ads and swap magazines such as Uncle Henry’s. Maine’s hunting and sporting heritage – and the deference for that heritage even among many Mainers who do not own guns – has played out in previous elections.

During the 2014 elections, Maine voters rejected a ballot initiative that sought to ban bear hunting while using bait, traps or dogs. Polling conducted for the Press Herald in June 2014 showed 48 percent of respondents supported the proposed ban with 44 percent opposed. That support steadily eroded as the election drew closer, however. In the end, 53 percent of voters opposed the bear referendum, which was heavily financed by the Humane Society of the United States.

This year, opponents are again accusing out-of-state interests of attempting to change Maine’s sporting traditions. That’s because Question 3 has been financed with more than $3 million from former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s gun control organization, Everytown for Gun Safety.

The NRA recently began airing television ads saying “Question 3 will not make Maine safer, it just puts the New York billionaires in charge of your life.” Mainers for Responsible Gun Ownership, which is leading the Question 3 campaign, has launched its own ads featuring hunters as well as former U.S. attorney Paula Silsby supporting the initiative.

 

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Letter to the editor: Don’t pin lost bid for Coast Guard contract on BIW unions http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/letter-to-the-editor-dont-pin-lost-bid-for-coast-guard-contract-on-biw-unions/ http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/letter-to-the-editor-dont-pin-lost-bid-for-coast-guard-contract-on-biw-unions/#comments Tue, 27 Sep 2016 08:00:00 +0000 http://www.pressherald.com/?p=1077561 I am writing to respond to Davies Allan’s Sept. 21 letter to the editor, “BIW contract loss should be a wake-up call on union rules.”

First, what background, knowledge or experience does Mr. Allan have in shipbuilding that informs his perspective on this subject? I have worked at Bath Iron Works for 42 years.

Shipbuilding is a complex process involving thousands of skilled workers and several million man hours to build an Arleigh Burke-class destroyer. It requires materials, planning, equipment and management, all of which are reflected in contract bids.

Our union negotiated a labor contract that included a four-year wage freeze and efficiency gains in order to try to win these Coast Guard contracts. Production workers at BIW have been represented by a labor union since June 1941.

Union shipyard workers at BIW produced more destroyers during the war than all of Japan. Since then, union workers have built cargo ships, tankers, roll-on roll-off ships and Navy cruisers and overhauled dozens of ships, including Coast Guard cutters.

Two dozen FFG-7 frigates were delivered to the Navy ahead of schedule and under budget. Thirty-four Arleigh Burke destroyers have been built, and the most advanced surface combatant in the world, USS Zumwalt, just sailed down the Kennebec to join the fleet.

We don’t need Mr. Allan’s bumper sticker anti-union slogans and insults to the best shipbuilders in the world. We are working hard every day to create and save our jobs. What are you doing, Mr. Allan?

John Portela

Brunswick

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Letter to the editor: Assessment of Trans-Pacific trade deal had unwarranted omissions http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/letter-to-the-editor-assessment-of-trans-pacific-trade-deal-had-unwarranted-omissions/ http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/letter-to-the-editor-assessment-of-trans-pacific-trade-deal-had-unwarranted-omissions/#comments Tue, 27 Sep 2016 08:00:00 +0000 http://www.pressherald.com/?p=1077558 The Maine Citizen Trade Policy Commission recently held a public hearing at the University of Southern Maine in Portland to review a contracted draft assessment of the Trans-Pacific Partnership’s effects upon Maine and to gather public testimony about TPP impacts.

The 2016 Trade Policy Assessment contained a passing reference to and discounted a Tufts University Global Development and Environmental Institute study that concluded that “the TPP will likely lead to losses in employment and increases in inequality.”

When pressed as to why the assessment excluded the work, Philip Trostel, a lead author of the assessment, responded that one of the authors of the Tufts study, Jeronim Capaldo, is a Marxist.

Trostel said he would “bet his house” that Nobel Prize-winning economist Joseph Stiglitz (who is on record as saying that Capaldo was probably right) had not even read Capaldo’s paper. Trostel also bet his house that if Stiglitz were to read Capaldo’s study, he would consider it bogus.

I was surprised to hear these assertions, and view them as revealing and unprofessional.

Trostel freely acknowledged that he and many “mainstream” economists recognize that market failures exist, so I would ask him: Does examining those failures constitute Marxism? Under what conditions would examining those market failures not result in the examiner being labeled a Marxist?

Further, is this the level of academic discourse that the Citizen Trade Policy Commission was seeking when it contracted with Trostel for this assessment? Does it consider ad hominem attacks to be a good use of public funds? Has the CTPC sought an apology from this economist?

Charlotte M. Otto

Freeport

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Letter to the editor: Thanks to Maine leaders for challenging harmful overtime rule http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/letter-to-the-editor-thanks-to-maine-leaders-for-challenging-harmful-overtime-rule/ http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/letter-to-the-editor-thanks-to-maine-leaders-for-challenging-harmful-overtime-rule/#comments Tue, 27 Sep 2016 08:00:00 +0000 http://www.pressherald.com/?p=1077555 I want to publicly thank Gov. LePage for joining the 17 states that have filed a complaint regarding the new U.S. Department of Labor overtime rule, which effectively doubles the amount required to pay salaried-exempt professionals.

This new requirement will affect my agency to the point of bankruptcy. While there exists a need to review minimum wages for salaried-exempt professionals, doubling the requirement is not the answer.

The decision impacts nonprofits egregiously and needs to be challenged. I am not an economist, but I am smart enough to realize that minimum salaries should be based on region, not pegged to an arbitrary percentage of salaries paid in certain areas of the country.

I also thank Sen. Susan Collins for having the courage to enter a bill to address this challenge.

If this federal overtime bill goes into effect as written, many nonprofits across the state of Maine will go out of business. Thank you, Gov. LePage, for understanding how this measure hurts business.

Ray Nagel, MBA

executive director, Independence Association

Brunswick

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Letter to the editor: One person’s bid to discourage prescribing of painkillers went nowhere http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/letter-to-the-editor-one-persons-bid-to-discourage-prescribing-of-painkillers-went-nowhere/ http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/letter-to-the-editor-one-persons-bid-to-discourage-prescribing-of-painkillers-went-nowhere/#comments Tue, 27 Sep 2016 08:00:00 +0000 http://www.pressherald.com/?p=1077549 When I had oral surgery recently, my dentist gave me the printed sheet about what to do for after-care, including over-the-counter pills for pain and a prescription for OxyContin.

Of course, my immediate thought was, “I’m not doing that!” But later what surprised me was that there wasn’t much pain at all – certainly nothing that ibuprofen couldn’t take care of.

When I next visited this doctor, I told him that the prescription was totally unnecessary and urged him, in light of the drug epidemic in our society, not to continue to give out such prescriptions. He told me that different people have different reactions to pain and if he doesn’t give the prescription, the patient might be calling him later asking him for more help.

Meanwhile, those pills could have entered society and caused more havoc, but didn’t – because I ripped up the paper on which the prescription was written.

Your editorial of Sept. 22 notes that pharmaceutical companies pushed narratives that resulted in “an explosion in painkiller prescriptions, convincing doctors and patients that these heavy drugs were necessary for relatively minor ailments.”

My small encounter with this activity and subsequent complaint went nowhere. I hope you have better results.

Delene Perley

Portland

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Our View: Help Maine’s lost youths find their way into workforce http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/our-view-help-maines-lost-youth-find-their-way-into-workforce/ http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/our-view-help-maines-lost-youth-find-their-way-into-workforce/#comments Tue, 27 Sep 2016 08:00:00 +0000 http://www.pressherald.com/?p=1077540 It is an incontrovertible truth that Maine needs more immigrants – the state’s demographics allow for no other solution.

But there are thousands of young residents already here who are not in the workforce but have the potential to contribute. For their sake and ours, they need to be pulled from the shadows and put to work.

These are residents age 18 to 24 who have no degree beyond high school and are not working or in school. They are rudderless, with their lives at a full halt and often with no one around them to show the way forward. They’ll likely come out of it eventually, when the waywardness of youth wears off, but too late to find a stable and fulfilling career path. Without intervention, they’ll struggle throughout life, and be a drain on social services.

They also didn’t just decide to end up where they are. Many have faced significant childhood trauma, their lives influenced by poverty, homelessness, addiction and incarceration.

There are 17,000 such residents in Maine – 15 percent of the age group, the highest in New England, according to the 2013 edition of Making Maine Work, a collaboration between the Maine Development Foundation and the Maine State Chamber of Commerce.

The 2016 edition, recently released, focuses on the need to increase net in-migration in Maine, given its aging workforce, low birth rates and lack of diversity. That is absolutely correct, as without an influx of more people, Maine employers in some of the biggest industries of the 21st century will not be able to adequately fill positions.

But we cannot forget the Mainers who lost their way sometime around high school graduation and are now floating untethered somewhere outside the view of mainstream society. These young men and women have been let down by many of the people around them and lost their aspirations for a better life. They lack basic skills, and the support to obtain them.

Some help may be coming out of Lewiston, where Goodwill Industries of Northern New England has received a $1 million federal grant to provide job training and educational opportunities to at-risk youth. In the next four years, 65 to 80 young Mainers will learn construction skills by repairing buildings in downtown Lewiston, and gain computer and life skills as well.

The organization has done this type of work successfully before, and it will be interesting to see what results they can achieve through this significant grant. Perhaps it can be used alongside other successful intiatives in this vein, such as the Jobs for Maine Graduates program, to make sure more young Mainers become productive members of society. As Maine’s demographics clearly show, the state needs every one it can get.

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Maine Voices: Referendum questions put new laws on a dangerous fast track http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/maine-voices-referendum-questions-put-new-laws-on-a-dangerous-fast-track/ http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/maine-voices-referendum-questions-put-new-laws-on-a-dangerous-fast-track/#comments Tue, 27 Sep 2016 08:00:00 +0000 http://www.pressherald.com/?p=1077357 NEWCASTLE — Making a new law in Maine is not easy. From the original concept to the final statute, the path of legislation is long and arduous.

The proposed law first has to be written so it makes sense. Next, it’s sent to a legislative committee where public hearings are held; discussed among committee members and possibly amended, then sent to the full House and Senate. After all that – if both House and Senate can agree – it is sent to the governor for his or her signature. This usually takes months, sometimes years.

There is, however, a quicker and easier route. It’s called a referendum, and all you need is money to get your law passed.

The citizens’ referendum is a way to bypass the entire legislative process and create a new and often controversial law without vetting, without discussion and without the approval of our elected lawmakers themselves.

The referendum is also used by those who want a law that has been rejected by the Legislature. The casino gambling referendums are a good example of this. Casinos were rejected by the Legislature for years. That didn’t stop the proponents, who then tried referendums. They were rejected by the people – three times.

But those who would benefit from the casinos had enough money to keep collecting signatures, keep lobbying and keep advertising, and they eventually succeeded with barely over 50 percent of the popular vote. The expensive campaign finally paid off for the big casino investors.

This election year, Maine voters are faced with five referendum questions. Proponents all chose to skirt the legislative process, and understandably so – they are all controversial ideas with far-reaching and possibly disastrous consequences.

The first question would legalize the recreational use of marijuana. With drug addiction in Maine at epidemic levels, voters need to ask: How will this affect our young people? Who exactly is going to benefit?

The second creates a heavy new tax and promises to direct it toward education. Again, serious questions remain. Is this what Maine’s economy needs? And how do we know the revenue will go toward education?

The third would impose strict new gun regulations, even though Maine is one of the safest states in the country. Does Maine really need new and onerous gun restrictions that haven’t worked in other states? Who is behind this effort?

The fourth would dramatically increase the minimum wage. How will this forced raise to mostly young and part-time workers affect our economy? And will it really help those it proposes to if it, in all likelihood, increases unemployment?

The fifth question would fundamentally change the way we vote. We would be the first state in the country to enact statewide ranked-choice voting. First, would it be constitutional? But also, what are the safeguards against voter fraud?

These questions and many more would be asked during the normal legislative process. All sides would weigh in so a well thought-out decision could be reached. Instead, in referendums, loose, oversimplified language is foisted on an unsuspecting public who are then bombarded with deceptive advertising.

These five questions are on the ballot because they couldn’t or wouldn’t pass in your Legislature and proponents had enough money to put them on the ballot directly. It is now up to you, Maine voter, to do the vetting, the research, and ultimately the deciding.

You are the lawmaker. And should any of these referendums pass, you are the only ones who can repeal them, as woe be it to the elected official who tries to repeal a law enacted by the people!

None of these five referendums should be allowed to pass. I say that not just because I believe all of them to be poorly thought-out and irresponsible ideas but also because it sets a dangerous precedent. Should these pass, we can only expect more weakly drafted, unresearched, partisan and risky laws to come before us in the next and future elections simply because the proponent has enough money to do so.

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Commentary: For healthy, productive adults, focus on foundation of early childhood, legislator says http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/commentary-for-healthy-productive-adults-focus-on-foundation-of-early-childhood-legislator-says/ http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/commentary-for-healthy-productive-adults-focus-on-foundation-of-early-childhood-legislator-says/#comments Tue, 27 Sep 2016 08:00:00 +0000 http://www.pressherald.com/?p=1077348 SOUTH PORTLAND — If you’re building a house, the first thing you do is lay down a foundation, and a lot of attention is paid to that foundation. If not done properly, windows and doors don’t shut completely. Floors slope and walls crack. A badly built foundation often will result in expensive home repairs later down the road.

The same is true for people. A lot goes into making healthy, productive adults. Our genes, our environments, our experiences and the relationships we have with our families and the people around us are the building blocks that make us who we are. Our early childhood experiences are the foundation upon which our adult successes, or failures, are built.

Without that foundation, the consequences are costly. Stressful environments and toxic relationships early in life are linked with bad outcomes – such as substance abuse, crime and unemployment – and the costly health care, law enforcement and welfare interventions that go along with them.

Our kids’ futures, and the collective prosperity of our state and our communities, depend on our ability to foster the well-being of our next generation, to build that solid foundation.

Unfortunately, too many Maine kids are being raised on the shaky foundation of poverty.

Maine’s child poverty rate has steadily increased over the past six years, resulting in 6,000 more kids living in poverty, bringing the total number to nearly 48,000. Not surprisingly, Maine dropped down five spots in one year in a national ranking of our children’s well-being.

Luckily, we know what it takes to ensure that even children experiencing poverty have the strong pillars of support they need to succeed in the future. Intervention in the form of early childhood programs such as pre-K can erase and even reverse the negative long-term effects of poverty.

Maine has begun to work on this issue. The Legislature enacted a law to establish universal voluntary pre-K in all school districts by the 2018-2019 school year and provided $4 million annually to help schools with startup costs associated with establishing new pre-K classrooms. The state leveraged its own investment, too, drawing down an additional $14.7 million in federal funds to expand pre-K programs in our state.

We also established preschool standards to ensure that pre-K programs were providing high-quality programming, not just the bare minimum. Those standards include restrictions on maximum class sizes, child-staff ratios, curriculum and screenings.

Our state’s commitment to pre-K is laudable, but no single program is a silver bullet. We know more must be done to ensure all Maine kids have a fair shot at success on a level playing field.

After all, there are many factors that can create uphill battles for our children – unstable family lives, limited access to quality health care and other issues can all hurt kids during their formative years. The high cost of child care, averaging $16,382 annually, also prevents many working parents from obtaining the best quality care they can for their children.

We need to do better.

That’s why I’m pleased to announce the creation of the Maine Children’s Caucus, a group of lawmakers dedicated to bipartisan, creative solutions to ensure our state has proven, solid policies to give all our kids a chance.

There are many good examples of states stepping up their leadership to strengthen our children’s early childhoods and build strong foundations.

Kansas‘ Family Engagement and Partnership Program recognizes how central family decisions and habits are to a child’s well-being and works to strengthen family-program connections and understanding. Washington state is making sure that everyone working with children shares common expectations and strategies through annual Starting Strong conferences. Alabama uses First Class Standards to ensure that all pre-K programs provide safe and high-quality learning environments.

The Maine Children’s Caucus, led by myself and state Rep. Matt Pouliot, R-Augusta, will work to replicate successful approaches like those right here in Maine and develop approaches specific to Maine’s needs.

We know we’re not alone in this fight. We legislators have heard from the Maine State Chamber of Commerce, police officers and even our nation’s military that good early childhood development is crucial to our state’s success, and our nation’s. We look forward to working with every willing partner to ensure every Maine child gets the right start in life.

 

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Charles Lawton: Engineers play critical roles in the future of our state’s economy http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/charles-lawton-engineers-play-critical-roles-in-the-future-of-our-states-economy/ http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/charles-lawton-engineers-play-critical-roles-in-the-future-of-our-states-economy/#comments Tue, 27 Sep 2016 08:00:00 +0000 http://www.pressherald.com/?p=1077336 Several weeks ago, Dana Humphrey, dean of the University of Maine’s College of Engineering, asked me to think about this question: “Why is the study of engineering important to the future of the Maine economy?”

In reflecting on this request, two answers emerged. The first is immediate, quite obvious and very straightforward. The second answer is far more important, in many ways counterintuitive and speaks to a much longer-term problem that is not at all obvious.

The first answer is that there are plenty of high-paying jobs available for trained engineers, and Maine’s economy needs people to fill them. According to the 2015 occupational survey from the U.S. Census Bureau, the average annual wage for engineers in Maine was $72,300. This figure was two-thirds higher than the average wage for all occupations in Maine of $43,260.

In addition, the Maine Department of Labor forecasts that Maine will see an average of 249 job openings in engineering each year through 2024. Of these projected employment opportunities, 231 will come from the need to replace engineers likely to retire.

In short, the study of engineering is important to the Maine economy because if we don’t educate young women and men in the skills of engineering, our economy will continue to stagnate, perhaps even to disintegrate before us, like the bridges over the Piscataqua, as the inability to fill critical positions leads more businesses to close or relocate.

As critical and obvious as is this answer to Dean Humphrey’s question, I believe it is less important than a second answer, one that is not directed at filling existing jobs (however critical they may be) but at preparing a workforce to imagine and create jobs that do not even exist today.

According to the biologist and naturalist Edward O. Wilson, the human species now stands at the threshold of “volitional evolution,” the “creation of artificial organisms, gene substitution and surgically precise modification of the genome.”

Wilson argues that these possibilities put at risk global biodiversity, including continuation of the human species. Our survival, he asserts, requires “intelligent self-understanding, based upon a greater independence of thought than that tolerated today even in our most advanced democratic societies.”

And I believe that the greatest importance of engineering for the future of the Maine economy lies in facing this challenge. Harkening back to the origins of the word “engineer” – the Latin “ingeniator,” defined as “one who makes, produces, generates, begets; one who possesses ingenuity” – it is clear that Maine, indeed the planet, needs people who meet this definition.

At base, an engineer is someone who embraces rather than retreats from complexity. He or she is someone who combines the highest respect for the harsh, intractable laws of nature (the reality of the “not me”) with a deepest commitment to finding solutions to human problems.

There is in economics today a revival of a pessimism not seen since the days of the populist fear mongers of the early 20th century.

“What will we do,” they cried, “with these millions of people streaming out of rural areas where 90 percent of the manual labor once needed to feed our nation is no longer necessary?” “Do not crucify mankind,” longtime populist leader William Jennings Bryan cried in campaign after campaign, “upon a cross of gold.”

Today, the proponents of “secular stagnation” declare a similar pessimism. They claim that this time, it really is different, that all the revolutionary inventions have been made, that digital communication and the “gig economy” will eliminate all but the most creative jobs, reducing the bulk of the population to desperately scrabbling for TaskRabbit, Uber driver and other temporary fee-for-service gigs that arise as they will on digital search boards.

My own view is that liberally trained engineers – well versed both in the technical realities that have destroyed so many jobs over the past generation and in the rich possibilities of human cultural creativity that has so successfully evolved over the past hundred thousand years – will have the independence of thought to find ways to address even as massive a challenge as both Edward Wilson and the proponents of “secular stagnation” present.

And that is why engineers are so important to the future of the Maine economy.

Charles Lawton is chief economist for Planning Decisions, Inc. He can be contacted at:

clawton@planningdecisions.com

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Another View: Opponent’s op-ed misconstrues impact of proposed Maine background check initiative http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/another-view-legislators-op-ed-misconstrues-impact-of-proposed-background-check-initiative/ http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/another-view-legislators-op-ed-misconstrues-impact-of-proposed-background-check-initiative/#comments Tue, 27 Sep 2016 08:00:00 +0000 http://www.pressherald.com/?p=1077330 In Maine right now, dangerous people can fail a background check at a dealer, but then simply pick up the classifieds or go on the internet and choose from more than 3,000 unlicensed gun sales posted each year. This is an unconscionable situation, and one that Question 3 on November’s ballot corrects by simply extending the current background check system to sales that occur on the private market.

Unfortunately, state Rep. Patrick Corey’s recent op-ed about Question 3 makes a series of false claims that need correction.

Question 3 does not interfere with gun ownership by law-abiding citizens. It does not redefine the definition of a transfer. It does not prohibit the lending of firearms to friends, family members or hunting partners, and it certainly does not “infringe upon the rights of decent Maine people.”

Corey’s claim that Question 3 would outlaw classified ad gun sales is also false. Under Question 3, no sale is outlawed. It simply makes sure every gun sale gets the same background check, so a seller can make sure the firearm he or she relinquishes custody of is not going into the hands of a dangerous person.

Corey’s claim that background checks will not stop criminals from obtaining guns? Again: False.

In fact, since a similar law was enacted in Colorado in 2013, at least 962 sales to dangerous people in the state – including convicted felons and domestic abusers – by unlicensed sellers have been blocked. It is clear that background checks stop the easy acquisition of guns by criminals.

As a law enforcement officer, keeping guns out of the hands of dangerous people is critically important to me. That’s why the Maine Chiefs of Police Association has endorsed Yes on 3, and we encourage Mainers to do the same in November.

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Sports Digest: Halep advances in China’s Wuhan Open as Begu is forced out with injury http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/sports-digest-halep-advances-as-begu-is-forced-out-with-injury/ http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/sports-digest-halep-advances-as-begu-is-forced-out-with-injury/#comments Tue, 27 Sep 2016 04:01:24 +0000 http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/sports-digest-halep-advances-as-begu-is-forced-out-with-injury/ TENNIS

Former French Open finalist Simona Halep took less than 70 minutes to reach the third round of China’s Wuhan Open in Wuhan, China, after fellow Romanian Irina-Camelia Begu retired in the second set Monday.

Serena Williams, who was replaced by Angelique Kerber at No. 1 in the rankings with her run to the U.S. Open title, has withdrawn from both Wuhan and Beijing because of an injured right shoulder.

COLLEGES

FOOTBALL: NFL scouts will get more access to college underclassmen under an agreement between the NFL and American Football Coaches Association.

Schools will be able designate five underclassmen for special eligibility after they have completed their second seasons of college football. NFL teams can scout them similarly to the way the league evaluates in their senior seasons.

Schools can petition the NFL to have more than five underclassmen given special eligibility.

• LSU starting defensive end Davon Godchaux was suspended indefinitely after being arrested following an incident with his girlfriend at his apartment.

MEN’S BASKETBALL: This year’s Puerto Rico Tipoff will move to Orlando, Florida, due to concerns about Zika virus on the island.

ESPN Events senior vice president Pete Derzis said the concern for the welfare of participants and spectators was “the primary driver” in the decision. Derzis said the plan is to return to Puerto Rico in the future.

ESPN Events owns and operates the tournament.

SOCCER

RUSSIA: CSKA Moscow Coach Leonid Slutsky says Tottenham fans have nothing to fear in Russia despite the violence between English and Russian supporters at the European Championship.

About 300 Tottenham fans are expected to attend Tuesday’s Champions League game against CSKA, the first visit to Russia by an English club since the violent clashes in Marseille in June.

HOCKEY

WORLD CUP: Kings forward Marian Gaborik is leaving the World Cup of Hockey and will be out for eight weeks because of a foot injury.

Gaborik was injured during Team Europe’s 3-2 overtime win over Sweden in the tournament semifinals.

DOG-SLED RACING

IDITAROD: Four-time Iditarod champion and cancer survivor Lance Mackey has dropped out of next year’s nearly 1,000-mile race for health reasons, organizers said.

According to race marshal Mark Nordman, Mackey plans to take better care of his health so he can be ready to compete again in 2018.

GOLF

RYDER CUP: Bubba Watson will be at the Ryder Cup, even if it’s not exactly the way he imagined it. U.S. captain Davis Love III announced that Watson has been added to the team as a fifth vice captain. The two-time Masters champion and seventh-ranked player in the world competed as a player on the last three U.S. squads, and said at the start of the year that his goals were to play in both the Olympics and the Ryder Cup.

Watson finished tied for eighth at the Rio Games, but he wound up just outside of the eighth and last automatic qualifying spot as a Ryder Cup player. He then began lobbying behind the scenes for one of the four captain’s picks at Love’s discretion.

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Analysis: Both candidates go on the attack in first debate http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/analysis-both-candidates-go-on-the-attack-in-first-debate/ http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/analysis-both-candidates-go-on-the-attack-in-first-debate/#comments Tue, 27 Sep 2016 04:01:02 +0000 http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/27/analysis-both-candidates-go-on-the-attack-in-first-debate/ WASHINGTON — So much for a subdued Donald Trump. So much for Hillary Clinton staying above the fray.

The first presidential debate of 2016 saw both candidates go on attack from the start, with gentility giving way to hostility within moments before what could be the largest TV audience for a debate ever.

Clinton said Trump didn’t pay his taxes, stiffed his workers and promoted racist theories of President Obama’s birth. Trump said Clinton was a typical feckless politician who paved the way for the growth of the Islamic State, abandoned the black community, led the nation toward fiscal ruin and lacks the stamina to be president.

The confrontation came at a pivotal point in the campaign, with polls showing the candidates virtually deadlocked six weeks before Election Day. In a Bloomberg Politics national poll released Monday, each drew 46 percent of likely voters in a head-to-head contest, while Trump gets 43 percent to Clinton’s 41 percent when third-party candidates are included.

Both candidates are battling negative perceptions that have depressed voter enthusiasm, even as the tumultuous campaign draws intense interest. Persistent questions over Clinton’s trustworthiness have dogged her campaign, while Trump’s bombast and often casual relationship with the truth have raised questions about his qualifications for the nation’s highest office.

But Monday night’s debate was likely to emphasize what supporters like about candidates. Clinton seemed unflappable, able to seem both better prepared and needle Trump. But for the Republican nominee, his unvarnished performance provided the outsider contrast likely to rally his base.

Here’s the tale of the tape:

‘BIRTHER’ DEBATE

Trump faced tough questions about his longtime refusal to accept that Obama was born in Hawaii, and declared during the debate he wouldn’t apologize.

The issue exploded back into the headlines after Trump admitted last week that Obama was born in the U.S., a reversal after years of trying to discredit the nation’s first black president.

Trump said he had “nothing” to say to those upset over the campaign because Obama “should have produced” his birth certificate “a long time before.”

Trump also repeated his false accusations that Clinton started the “birther” controversy during the 2008 campaign.

TAXES, TRADE

An economic discussion in the opening minutes led to a fiery exchange between the candidates, including a shouting match over trade deals, taxes – and, somehow, when the Islamic State was founded.

Clinton sought to bait Trump early, needling him over millions in loans he received from his father to launch his real estate and casino empire. Trump bit, dismissing the gifts as “a very small loan.”

That gave way to an angry exchange over the North American Free Trade Agreement, which Trump noted was signed under President Clinton. The Republican dismissed it as “the worst trade deal signed, maybe anywhere.”

He also launched a blistering attack on the Democratic nominee over the pending Trans-Pacific Partnership, accusing Clinton of changing her position on the trade deal after seeing that Trump’s opposition was gaining traction. He also tried to force Clinton to denounce Obama, who supports the deal.

“Donald, I know you live in your reality, but that is not the facts,” Clinton said, drawing chuckles in the debate auditorium. She also referred skeptics to her website to read her economic plan That prompted Trump to shout that Clinton also revealed her plan to fight Islamic State, also known as ISIS, on her website, in a way that would disadvantage U.S. interests.

“No wonder you’ve been fighting ISIS your entire adult life,” Trump said. In fact, the terrorist group was founded in 1999.

“By the end of the evening, I’m going to be blamed for everything that has ever happened,” Clinton retorted.

EMAILS, TAX RETURNS

Trump wants to make a deal on releasing his tax returns.

The Republican nominee, who has repeatedly refused to hand them over, said he’s willing to make them public if Clinton releases thousands of deleted emails from her private server.

Clinton dismissed the offer as “another example of bait-and-switch,” while acknowledging she had made a “mistake” by relying on the private email system.

FEDERAL RESERVE

The Republican nominee took a detour in attacking his opponent to go after Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen.

“The Fed is being more political than Secretary Clinton,” he said, repeating his contention that the Fed is keeping interest rates at an unusually low level.

“The day Obama goes off and he leaves and he goes off to the golf course for the rest of his life to play golf, when they raise interest rates, you’re going to see some very bad things happen,” he said.

Trump has previously said that the Fed has inflated the stock market, and turmoil could result when rates are increased. That doesn’t hold up to past experience: Markets were calm when Yellen and her colleagues raised rates in December, moving them above near-zero for the first time since the end of 2008.

Clinton didn’t respond directly to Trump on Monday, but she has blasted Trump previously for accusing the central bank of being political. “You should not be commenting on Fed actions when you are either running for president or you are president,” she told reporters on Sept. 6.

The Fed also insists that it is apolitical, a point Yellen reiterated during a news conference in Washington last week.

“I can say, emphatically, that partisan politics plays no role in our decisions about the appropriate stance of monetary policy,” she said on Sept. 21.

RACE, CRIMINAL JUSTICE

A discussion of criminal justice drew a sharp exchange, with Trump describing increased crime rates in black neighborhoods and calling for “law-and-order” and an expansion of stop-and-frisk policing.

Clinton said it’s “unfortunate” Trump painted “a dire, negative picture of black communities” and said he needs to present a plan for repairing race relations. Clinton said she wants to do more to keep people from going to jail in the first place, such as diversion programs and an end to some mandatory sentences that require jail time.

The number of violent crimes in the U.S. increased 3.9 percent in 2015 from a year earlier amid a 10.8 jump in murders and non-negligent manslaughter, according to annual crime statistics released by the FBI on Monday.

While credited by many for reducing crime, New York’s stop-and-frisk program was ended by current Mayor Bill de Blasio, a Democrat, who said the frequent stops of minority youths caused a loss of trust in black and Hispanic communities.

Trump defended the policy, saying the effort was “to take the guns away” from criminals rather than target minorities. He also disputed the policy was unconstitutional, as was ruled by a U.S. district judge.

Trump made a veiled reference to Clinton’s recent bout of pneumonia, saying that, unlike Clinton, he had visited black communities in Philadelphia and Michigan.

“You decided to stay home, and that’s OK,” Trump said.

Clinton fired back by questioning Trump’s readiness.

“I think Donald just criticized me for preparing for this debate,” she said. “And you know what else: I’m prepared to be president.”

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NFL roundup: Falcons run past Saints http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/26/nfl-roundup-falcons-run-past-saints/ http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/26/nfl-roundup-falcons-run-past-saints/#comments Tue, 27 Sep 2016 03:58:00 +0000 http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/26/nfl-roundup-falcons-run-past-saints/ NEW ORLEANS — Tevin Coleman rushed for three touchdowns, Matt Ryan passed for two TDs, and Deion Jones returned an interception 90 yards for a score to help the Atlanta Falcons beat the winless New Orleans Saints 45-32 on Monday night.

The game was played nearly 10 years to the day after the Saints’ memorable return to the Superdome on Sept. 25, 2006, 13 months after Hurricane Katrina. But there would be no reprise of New Orleans’ dominant and emotional 23-3 triumph a decade ago.

The Saints’ depleted defense struggled to slow down Devonta Freeman, who rushed for 152 yards and caught five passes for 55 yards. Coleman also was effective in the passing game out of the backfield, with three receptions for 47 yards to go with his 42 yards rushing.

Ryan finished with 240 yards passing for Atlanta (2-1) which did not turn the ball over and moved into sole possession of first place in the NFC South.

Drew Brees put up his usual big numbers – 376 yards and three TDs passing – but his interception for a touchdown on a tipped pass early in the fourth quarter gave the Falcons a 45-25 lead that proved too much for New Orleans to overcome.

GIANTS: Shane Vereen will require surgery on a triceps injury, the Giants announced, leaving the team without its best pass-catching running back and currently its leading rusher for what could be the rest of the year.

He will be placed on injured reserve. After first describing the procedure as “season-ending” earlier Monday, the Giants said later in the afternoon there is a chance for Vereen to return from that designation if he heals quickly enough. He will not be eligible to return until late November.

STEELERS: Le’Veon Bell stood at his locker, his face covered in sweat and his eagerness to kickstart his stalled NFL career palpable.

His three-game suspension for a second violation of the league’s substance abuse policy over, the Pittsburgh Steelers running back is ready to get back to work, particularly after spending Sunday afternoon watching his teammates get clobbered across the state in Philadelphia.

The team that looked borderline unstoppable at times during wins over Washington and Cincinnati was a mess against the Eagles. DeAngelo Williams, who filled in so brilliantly for Bell during the opening two weeks, slogged for just 21 yards. The offense posted its lowest point total in five years and the defense spent the afternoon futilely trying to make Eagles quarterback Carson Wentz look like a rookie.

Enter Bell, limited to six of Pittsburgh’s last 22 games thanks to knee injuries and run-ins with the league’s drug policy.

An All-Pro in 2014 when he emerged as one of the best all-around backs in the league, Bell believes he’s a better player than the one last seen being carted off the field in a loss to the Bengals last November with a torn MCL in his right knee.

SEAHAWKS: Quarterback Russell Wilson has a sprained MCL in his left knee and Coach Pete Carroll raised the possibility of Wilson missing the Week 4 game against the New York Jets.

Carroll said during his weekly radio show on KIRO-AM that Wilson “feels great” and that his recovery is already going “exceedingly well.”

Wilson underwent an MRI on Sunday night that confirmed the ligament sprain and Wilson received treatment all night, Carroll said.

Wilson was injured in the third quarter of Sunday’s 37-18 win over San Francisco when he was pulled down awkwardly while being sacked by Eli Harold. Wilson stayed down on the field for a few moments after the injury before walking off.

JETS: New York is giving Austin Seferian-Jenkins a chance to redeem himself off the field and get his NFL career back on track.

The talented but troubled tight end was claimed off waivers from the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, who cut him last week after he was arrested on suspicion of driving while under the influence.

WASHINGTON: Coach Jay Gruden said safety DeAngelo Hall will miss the rest of the season with a torn ligament in his right knee.

BENGALS: Linebacker Vontaze Burfict is back with the Bengals, looking to inject some energy into a team off to its worst start in five years.

Burfict was suspended by the NFL for the first three games of the season because of his numerous illegal hits on opponents.

His hit to receiver Antonio Brown’s head drew a penalty that set up Pittsburgh’s last-minute field goal for an 18-16 playoff win last season.

RAIDERS: Oakland released Pro Bowl fullback Marcel Reece after his four-game suspension for performance enhancing drugs was completed.

CHARGERS: Coach Mike McCoy says linebacker Manti Te’o will miss the rest of the season with a torn left Achilles tendon.

TEXANS: Left tackle Duane Brown returned to practice for the first time since January surgery to repair a torn quadriceps, and Coach Bill O’Brien said he could play on Sunday against Tennessee.

Former Dallas defensive end Greg Hardy, who remains unsigned after a tumultuous 2015 season revolving around his domestic violence case in North Carolina, was arrested on a cocaine possession charge in Texas.

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Major league roundup: Yankees avoid sweep by beating Jays, 7-5 http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/26/major-league-roundup-yankees-avoid-sweep-by-beating-jays-7-5/ http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/26/major-league-roundup-yankees-avoid-sweep-by-beating-jays-7-5/#comments Tue, 27 Sep 2016 03:53:42 +0000 http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/26/major-league-roundup-yankees-avoid-sweep-by-beating-jays-7-5/ TORONTO — Mark Teixeira hit a tying homer in the ninth inning and Aaron Hicks added a game-winning blast as the New York Yankees avoided a four-game sweep, beating the Toronto Blue Jays 7-5 on Monday night.

With Toronto leading 3-2 heading to the ninth, Manager John Gibbons called on Jason Grilli (7-6) to close it out because Roberto Osuna was unavailable after pitching the previous two days.

Teixeira tied it 3-all with a one-out drive into the second deck in right. After flipping his bat, Teixeira yelled “Blown save!” at Grilli after returning to the dugout.

Didi Gregorius singled and Hicks followed with a two-run homer.

New York scored five runs in a bat-around ninth, matching their total from the 35 previous innings in the series.

INDIANS 7, TIGERS 4: Cleveland clinched the AL Central title, overcoming an injury to ace right-hander Corey Kluber in a victory at Detroit.

Kluber left after four innings with right groin tightness, joining Carlos Carrasco and Danny Salazar in a group of talented Cleveland pitchers dealing with injuries. But even those concerns were secondary when the Indians poured onto the field to celebrate their first division title since 2007.

Buck Farmer (0-1) allowed four runs in five innings for the Tigers, who fell two games behind Baltimore for the second AL wild card.

WHITE SOX 7, RAYS 1: James Shields (6-18) pitched six effective innings for his first win in two months and Justin Morneau and Carlos Sanchez each hit a two-run homer in a win at Chicago.

NATIONAL LEAGUE

MARLINS 7, METS 3: Dee Gordon homered leading off the first inning for Miami, which totaled 14 hits and mixed cheers with the tears of the past two days in its first game since Jose Fernandez died in a boating accident early Sunday morning.

Adam Conley pitched three scoreless innings subbing for Fernandez, who had been scheduled to make his final start of the year.

CUBS 12, PIRATES 2: Javier Baez hit a grand slam and drove in a career-high six runs and major league ERA leader Kyle Hendricks pitched six scoreless innings as visiting Chicago won its 100th game.

REDS 15, CARDINALS 2: Joey Votto and Adam Duvall hit two of the Cincinnati’s four homers as the Reds won a rout at St. Louis.

Steve Selsky went 5 for 5 including a homer, four RBI and scored three runs. He’s the first Reds rookie to have five hits in a game since Wade Rowdon against the Mets on July 9, 1986.

DIAMONDBACKS 14, NATIONALS 4: Jean Segura had two homers and Yasmany Tomas hit a three-run shot and drove in two more runs with a double. Mitch Haniger and Jake Lamb also homered for Arizona as Washington pitchers gave up a season-high five home runs.

INTERLEAGUE

BREWERS 8, RANGERS 3: Jonathan Villar had two home runs and a career-high five RBI and Matt Garza beat his former team as Milwaukee won at Arlington, Texas.

The loss dropped American League West-champion Texas one-half game behind the Boston Red Sox in the race for the league’s best record. The Cleveland Indians pulled within one-half game of the Rangers.

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Field hockey: York tops Falmouth 5-0 to stay unbeaten http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/26/field-hockey-york-tops-falmouth-5-0/ http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/26/field-hockey-york-tops-falmouth-5-0/#comments Tue, 27 Sep 2016 03:53:18 +0000 http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/26/field-hockey-york-tops-falmouth-5-0/ FALMOUTH —The top two field hockey teams in the Western Maine Conference met for the second time in less than two weeks Monday night with the same result.

Undefeated York, the top-ranked team in Class B South, scored four second-half goals to roll to a 5-0 win against Falmouth, which came into the game as the top-ranked team in Class A South.

The Wildcats (10-0) have improved since their 3-1 win against the Yachtsmen (9-2) on Sept. 14 in a game played at York.

“We always have room to grow,” said senior Lily Posternak.

“We’ll keep on working hard in practice because we obviously can’t get complacent.”

It was the 46th consecutive win for the Wildcats since Nokomis handed them a 1-0 loss in the 2013 Class B state championship game.

“They passed the ball beautifully, executed really well, and we really had a hard time adjusting,” Falmouth Coach Robin Haley said.

“We had some opportunities and we just couldn’t execute and it showed.

“We turned the ball over. We put the ball in the air. Those are costly mistakes and we can’t afford to play that kind of game against a team like York because they’re going to capitalize on it.”

“You just focus and stay in the moment and continue to work,” York Coach Barb Marois said.

It was the fourth consecutive shutout for the Wildcats, the two-time defending Class B state champion and a regional champion in 10 of the last 12 seasons.

“We really applied pressure off the bat and we kept it on,” Posternak said. “We needed to put pressure as soon as they touched the ball and we did that.”

York held a 1-0 lead at halftime.

After receiving a pass from Isabel Bretz, Posternak put in a shot from just inside the circle to open the scoring 17:23 into the game. The goal came after the fourth of the Wildcats’ eight penalty corners during the first half.

One of the Yachtsmen’s best scoring chances during the first half came when Isabella Libby rang a shot off the left post less then three minutes into the game.

“If we could have gotten that goal maybe we would have settled down,” Haley said.

The Wildcats got goals from Sydney Bouchard, Bretz, Alexandra Lawlor and Bailey Oliver in the second half.

York held a 14-9 advantage in shots and a 13-8 edge in penalty corners. The Wildcats scored on four of their penalty corners.

“My girls stayed in it and they played until the final buzzer,” Haley said.

“Had we’d been able to get the win it would have been a big boost.”

Added Haley: “We’re going to have to regroup and prepare for the rest of the season and the playoffs and we’ve got to win. We just have to do a better job with our stick work and take care of some of our passing. We rushed, and we need to play with a little bit more composure.”

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Major league notebook: Nationals catcher injures leg http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/26/major-league-notebook-nationals-catcher-injures-leg/ http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/26/major-league-notebook-nationals-catcher-injures-leg/#comments Tue, 27 Sep 2016 03:48:10 +0000 http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/26/major-league-notebook-nationals-catcher-injures-leg/ WASHINGTON — Nationals catcher Wilson Ramos left Washington’s game against the Arizona Diamondbacks with an apparent right leg injury, a potentially damaging blow to the NL East champions.

Ramos was injured on a play at the plate in the sixth inning Monday night when he jumped for a throw and landed awkwardly on his leg. Arizona’s Brandon Drury scored but didn’t make contact with Ramos.

After clutching at his right leg on the ground, Ramos had to be helped off the field by trainers. He was replaced by Pedro Severino.

Ramos tore the ACL and medial collateral ligament in his right knee in 2012.

He is hitting .307 with 22 home runs and 80 RBI this season for the playoff-bound Nationals, who clinched the NL East title on Saturday.

YANKEES: After sitting out the past seven games with a sore right hamstring, second-baseman Starlin Castro entered as a pinch hitter in Monday’s 7-5 win over Toronto, but he did not play in the field.

 Injured right-hander Masahiro Tanaka will be examined by team physician Dr. Christopher Ahmad when the Yankees return home. Tanaka, who has a right forearm strain, has not thrown in the past five days.

DIAMONDBACKS: Right-hander Rubby De La Rosa is trying to avoid a second Tommy John surgery by having a stem cell injection in his ailing elbow.

Manager Chip Hale said De La Rosa met with Dr. James Andrews and decided to try the stem cell injection instead of another major surgery. Hale didn’t have a timeframe for De La Rosa’s return other than he will miss the remainder of the season.

CARDINALS: Shortstop Aledmys Diaz left the club to join Jose Fernandez’s family in a private ceremony. Diaz and Fernandez, the Miami Marlins pitcher who died in a boating accident early Sunday morning, were boyhood friends.

TIGERS: Manager Brad Ausmus said third baseman Nick Castellanos, working through a left-hand issue, could be back before the weekend. He’s currently in the instructional league.

METS: If outfield prospect Tim Tebow is going to have trouble with the curve, it won’t be revealed for at least a few more days.

During the fall Instructional League, the repertoire of Mets pitchers is limited to fastballs and change-ups. At least until Wednesday, when the Mets play the Cardinals, Tebow will not have to contend with breaking balls, which have been the undoing of many a prospect with good swing mechanics.

On Monday, though, Tebow had trouble enough with fastballs and change-ups in his two plate appearances during the Mets’ first intrasquad game, striking out swinging both times.

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Maine Milestones http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/26/maine-milestones-52/ http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/26/maine-milestones-52/#comments Tue, 27 Sep 2016 03:38:20 +0000 http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/26/maine-milestones-52/ The Maine Running Hall of Fame will induct seven members at its 2016 induction ceremony on Nov. 13 at the Governor’s Hill Mansion in Augusta.

The honorees are:

 Larry Allen of Mt. Desert Island, who helped establish women’s indoor track at the University of Maine.

 Robert Ashby of Brunswick, an outstanding distance runner who has won numerous marathons, including this year’s Bay of Fundy International Marathon at age 47.

 Steve Podgajny of Brunswick, who ran a personal-best time of 2:16:46 at the 1981 Boston Marathon and later founded the Maine Distance Festival, a track meet at Bowdoin College that featured some of the nation’s top runners.

 Phil Pierce of Falmouth, who has completed 30 Boston Marathon and many ultramarathons, and has had leadership roles with the Maine Track Club, Maine Running Hall of Fame, New England 65+ Runners Club and Maine Sports Hall of Fame.

 Gretchen Read of Portland, who became an outstanding masters runner after taking up the sport at age 50.

 Bill Reilly of Brownfield, a top age-group runner with personal bests of 16:59 for 5K and 2:43:58 for the marathon, and a longtime coach at Fryeburg Academy.

 Mike Westphal of Cranberry Island, a former Paul Bunyan Marathon champion who continues to run and raise money for charity despite being diagnosed nine years ago with Parkinson’s disease.

The hall will also honor two of the states oldest races: the Pat’s Pizza Clam Festival Classic in Yarmouth and the Great Pumpkin 10K in Saco.

Tickets for the induction ceremony are $25 and can be purchased at www.eventbrite.com/e/maine-running-hall-of-fame-induction-banquet-tickets-27445193312.

Frank Juliano used a 6-iron to record a hole-in-one on the 15th hole at Willowdale Golf Club on Sept. 5. The 147-yard shot was witnessed by Bob Parent, Glenn Stone and John Bilodeau.

Janice Pierce made a hole-in-one on the sixth hole at Toddy Brook Golf Course on Sept. 15. Pierce used a 6-iron for the 85-yard shot, witnessed by Scott Pierce and Kent Pierce.

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More details emerge in death of baseball star http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/26/more-details-emerge-in-death-of-baseball-star/ http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/26/more-details-emerge-in-death-of-baseball-star/#comments Tue, 27 Sep 2016 03:06:47 +0000 http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/26/more-details-emerge-in-death-of-baseball-star/ MIAMI — Miami Marlins ace Jose Fernandez was seen at a Miami River bar and may have argued with a girlfriend in the hours before his boat crashed into a jetty off South Beach on Sunday morning, killing him and two friends.

Fernandez, 24, died when his 32-foot SeaVee “Kaught Looking” slammed into the Government Cut north jetty at a high speed, investigators say. He died in the crash along with Emilio Jesus Macias, 27, and Eduardo Rivero, 25. The incident remains under investigation by the Florida Fish & Wildlife Commission, which changed its story Monday and acknowledged that the boat belonged to Fernandez.

Investigators have not indicated what the trio was doing, or where they were going when their boat, headed south, plowed into the dark rocks that jut east into the ocean from South Pointe Park after 3 a.m. But the Miami Herald confirmed that Fernandez was at American Social Bar & Kitchen in Brickell sometime overnight. A spokesperson for the bar said there was no timeline for his appearance, but acknowledged in a statement attributed to an unidentified manager that he was there, as first reported by TMZ.com.

“Jose Fernandez was a guest at American Social. We would like to extend our sincerest condolences, thoughts and prayers to the families and friends who share in the loss of the three victims involved in this tragic boating accident and to the Miami Marlins organization,” the statement said.

The confirmation of Fernandez’s whereabouts was just one of several details to trickle out following the violent crash, which ripped the fiberglass from the left side of the hull and flipped the vessel onto the jetty rocks. Divers found two men trapped beneath the boat while a third was thrown from the vessel.

Initially, an FWC officer said the boat was not Fernandez’s, but belonged to “a friend of Jose’s who is very well connected to several Marlins players.” Officer Lorenzo Veloz said he’d seen the boat several times, and that Fernandez was never behind the wheel.

Though there is no criminal case – everyone in the accident is dead and there would be no one to charge – the FWC turned to prosecutors to draft a search warrant to search the boat, in an abundance of caution. A Miami-Dade State Attorney’s spokesman would not talk specifics.

In a press release, FWC Officer Rob Klepper confirmed Macias and Rivero were also aboard Fernandez’s boat Sunday morning. The two friends were both graduates of G. Holmes Braddock Senior High School and both have studied psychology at Florida International University – Rivero was still attending.

Macias, the son of a Miami-Dade police detective, worked at Wells Fargo Advisors. Rivero, an avid boxer, worked for Carnival Cruises.

It’s not clear if the two friends were with Fernandez when he left the bar.

Klepper declined to discuss whether they were looking into Fernandez’s appearance at American Social. He also declined to discuss whether investigators were aware of a Sunday Instagram post from Will Bernal, a friend of Rivero’s who said Fernandez was upset about something before the trio boarded his boat.

“Try to keep him close to shore if you go out,” Bernal texted Rivero.

“Trust me it’s not my time yet,” Rivero responded.

“I know but try to keep Jose cool, tell him what I said,” Bernal wrote back.

In an interview with the Miami Herald, Bernal said Rivero had only met Fernandez within the past few months and had actually left a birthday party late Saturday night to hang out with the Marlins superstar, “who was really stressed out.”

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Monday’s high school roundup: Morse boys’ soccer scores in OT to beat Oceanside http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/26/mondays-high-school-roundup-morse-boys-soccer-scores-in-ot-to-beat-oceanside/ http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/26/mondays-high-school-roundup-morse-boys-soccer-scores-in-ot-to-beat-oceanside/#comments Tue, 27 Sep 2016 03:00:58 +0000 http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/26/mondays-high-school-roundup-morse-boys-soccer-scores-in-ot-to-beat-oceanside/ ROCKLAND — Declan Hall scored with 1:58 left in overtime to lift Morse to a 2-1 win over Oceanside in a boys’ soccer game Monday afternoon.

The Shipbuilders (5-3) took a 1-0 lead with 27 minutes remaining in the first half on a direct kick from Dakota Freeman.

The Mariners tied it on a goal by Sam Townsend with 10 minutes left in the second half.

Mariners goalie Colby Dorr recorded 13 saves. Alex Fernald stopped 11 shots for Morse.

A.R. GOULD 3, GREATER PORTLAND CHRISTIAN SCHOOL 2: Issak Aliyow scored twice to lead A.R. Gould (5-3) past the Lions (1-5-1) in South Portland.

A.R. Gould got out to a 2-0 advantage on goals by Aliyow and Tyrese Collins.

The Lions cut the lead to 2-1 before halftime on Christian Patterson’s goal from Jeremiah Hammond.

Aliyow added his second goal to open the second half, putting the Lions up 3-1.

Hammond added a goal for the Lions late in the second-half on a penalty kick.

GORHAM 8, MASSABESIC 0: Jackson Fotter scored four goals to lead the Rams (6-0-1) past the Mustangs (0-8) in Gorham.

Kyle King scored two goals for Gorham, and Andrew Rent and Kyle Patterson each added a goal. Tyler Richman and Ethan Orach each had two assists.

Mustangs goalie Joshua Castonguay recorded 10 saves.

Alex York stopped three shots for Gorham.

FIELD HOCKEY

YARMOUTH 3, CAPE ELIZABETH 0: Sophia McGrath had a goal and an assist in the first half to lead the Clippers (6-4) past the Capers (4-5) in Cape Elizabeth.

Molly Wilson added a goal to put the Capers up 3-0 in the second half.

Capers goalie Kinnon McGrath recorded 11 saves. Cate Ralph stopped three shots for the Clippers.

FRYEBURG ACADEMY 6, GREELY 0: Grace Condon scored twice and added an assist to lead the Raiders (4-5-1) past the Rangers (4-5) in Fryeburg.

Condon scored twice in the first half, and Bridget Tweedie and Taylor Kruger also scored to give Fryeburg Academy a 4-0 lead at the half. Kruger finished with two goals.

Rangers goalie Kylie Rogers recorded 14 saves.

Kaleigh Rose stopped two shots for Fryeburg.

WELLS 4, MAINE GIRLS ACADEMY/WAYNFLETE 1: The Warriors (2-6-1) scored four second-half goals and beat the Flying Lions (0-7) in Portland.

Hannah Moody, Takara McDermott and Delaney O’Brien each scored in an eight-minute span in the second half to put the Warriors ahead 3-0. Marissa Mizzoni added a goal with two minutes remaining.

Gabby Eng assisted on a goal by Semhar Yehdego for the Flying Lions.

Goalie Kiera MacWhinnie recorded 19 saves.

UPDATE: This story was changed at 10:30 a.m. on Sept. 27 to correctly identify the Massabesic boys’ soccer goalie.

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Clinton, Trump trade insults, accusations in heated first debate http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/26/clinton-trump-poised-for-must-see-debate-showdown/ http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/26/clinton-trump-poised-for-must-see-debate-showdown/#comments Tue, 27 Sep 2016 02:38:00 +0000 http://www.pressherald.com/?p=1077660 HEMPSTEAD, N.Y. — Donald Trump aggressively blamed the nation’s chronic problems on Hillary Clinton, yet found himself mostly on the defensive in their first debate here Monday night as she accused him of racist behavior, hiding potential conflicts of interest and “stiffing” those who helped build his business empire.

After circling each other for months, Clinton and Trump finally took the stage together for the first time, and each tried in a series of combative, acrimonious exchanges to discredit the other.

Trump, the Republican nominee, spent nearly the entire evening explaining himself – over his temperament, treatment of women and minorities, business practices and readiness to be commander in chief, as well as over his long perpetuation of a falsehood about Barack Obama’s birthplace to delegitimize his presidency.

“He has a long record of engaging in racist behavior, and the birther lie was a very hurtful one,” said Clinton, the Democratic nominee. “Barack Obama is a man of great dignity, and I could tell how much it bothered him and annoyed him that this was being touted and used against him.”

Trump, who earlier this month at last acknowledged Obama’s birth in Hawaii, replied by invoking Clinton’s 2008 rivalry with Obama: “When you try to act holier than thou, it really doesn’t work.”

In an earlier exchange, when Clinton said it is unfortunate that Trump paints a dire picture of the livelihoods and economic circumstances of many African-Americans, Trump groaned in apparent disgust.

HUGE AUDIENCE AT CRITICAL POINT

The 95-minute debate at Hofstra University on New York’s Long Island pitted two historically unpopular and polarizing nominees against each other. The television networks were preparing for as many as 100 million people to watch, which would put Monday night’s debate in the pantheon of the Super Bowl.

The clash came at a critical juncture in the campaign. With six weeks until Election Day, and with voters in some states already starting to cast ballots, polls show Clinton’s summer lead has all but evaporated. Trump is effectively tied in many of the battleground states where Clinton had enjoyed comfortable leads.

Donald Trump gestures toward Hillary Clinton during the presidential debate Monday night at Hofstra University.

Donald Trump gestures toward Hillary Clinton during the presidential debate Monday night at Hofstra University. Rick T. Wilking/Pool via Associated Press

Clinton poured forth with policy details and practiced catch phrases – “Trumped-up trickle down” to describe his tax plan, for instance – and tried to sow doubts about the seriousness of Trump’s proposals. She seized on his comments about Russian President Vladimir Putin to suggest that Trump does not understand the global threats the country faces.

Where Clinton was measured in her attacks, Trump was a feisty and sometimes undisciplined aggressor. He regularly interrupted Clinton, as well as the moderator, “NBC Nightly News” anchor Lester Holt, and raised his voice. At times, Trump delivered rambling, heated and defensive answers.

Despite evidence to the contrary, Trump vehemently denied he had supported the Iraq war at the outset, as Clinton had, while Clinton looked on incredulously. Trump sought to blame Clinton for the growth of the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria, saying, “You were secretary of state when it was a little infant.”

Clinton mocked Trump’s discussion of national security, suggesting he is uninformed and even unstable. “Whoo,” she said with a laugh, when Trump finished one oration about NATO and the Islamic State.

Earlier, Trump grew visibly frustrated by Clinton’s critique of his economic plan and declared: “Typical politician. All talk. No action. Sounds good. Doesn’t work. Never gonna happen. Our country is suffering because people like Secretary Clinton have made such bad decisions in terms of our jobs, in terms of what’s going on.”

Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump shake hands before Monday night's presidential debate at Hofstra University in Hempstead, N.Y.

Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump shake hands before Monday night’s presidential debate at Hofstra University in Hempstead, N.Y. Julio Cortez/Associated Press

A CORDIAL START

Trump, whose pugilistic aggression made him a dominant force in the Republican primary debates, began the first general-election debate with an uncharacteristically respectful tone. He ditched his campaign trail nickname of “Crooked Hillary” to call his opponent “Secretary Clinton.”

“Is that OK?” he asked her. Clinton smiled. “Good,” Trump continued. “I want you to be very happy. It’s very important to me.”

But Trump’s demeanor quickly grew more aggressive. He tried to portray Clinton as a relic of Washington and protector of the status quo. In one of his few dominant moments, he challenged Clinton on trade policy, saying the North American Free Trade Agreement and other trade pacts have contributed to the hollowing-out of America’s middle class.

“Your husband signed NAFTA, which was one of the worst things that ever happened to the manufacturing industry,” Trump said to Clinton. “You go to New England, you go to Ohio, you go to Pennsylvania – you go anywhere you want, Secretary Clinton, and you will see devastation.”

Trump added: “You’ve been doing this for 30 years. Why are you just thinking about these solutions right now?”

Near the end of the debate, Trump repeated his claim that Clinton lacks what he sees as “the presidential look.”

“She doesn’t have the look. … She doesn’t have the stamina,” Trump said.

Clinton looked with a smile, laughing.

“As soon as he travels to 112 countries,” Clinton said, “he can talk to me about stamina.”

That line drew loud applause in the hall.

Former President Bill Clinton and Chelsea Clinton watch the debate.

Former President Bill Clinton and Chelsea Clinton watch the debate. Joe Raedle/Pool via Associated Press

Clinton continued. She said that Trump had tried to change the conversation from her “look” to whether she had stamina.

“This is a man who has called women pigs, slobs and dogs,” Clinton said. “One of the worst things he said was about a woman in a beauty contest. He loves beauty contests, supporting them and hanging around them. He called this woman ‘Miss Piggy,’ and then he called her ‘Miss Housekeeping,’ because she is Latina,” Clinton said. “She has a name, Donald.”

Trump countered by suggesting that he had considered delving into the Clinton family’s tawdry past on the debate stage. Over the weekend, Trump had threatened to invite Gennifer Flowers, one of Bill Clinton’s former mistresses, to attend the debate.

“I was going to say something extremely tough to Hillary, to her family, and I said, ‘I just can’t do it,’ ” Trump said.

CLINTON PRESSES TRUMP ON TAX RETURNS

Clinton accused Trump of postponing the release of his tax returns – something every presidential nominee has done for decades – because he has something to hide. Trump has said he is keeping his returns private at the advice of his lawyers because he is under federal audit.

Clinton speculated that Trump was “hiding” his tax returns because they would show he is not as rich as he says he is, or is not as charitable as he claims, or has debts to major banks and foreign entities, or pays nothing in taxes at all.

At that last suggestion, Trump scoffed. “That makes me smart,” he said.

Trump countered by offering to release his taxes if Clinton agreed to release her missing 33,000 emails. “I think it’s disgraceful,” Trump said of her use of a private email server as secretary of state. “And believe me, this country really thinks it’s disgraceful also.”

Clinton said, “I made a mistake using a private email.”

“That’s for sure,” Trump interjected.

“I don’t make any excuses,” she continued.

With her concise answer, Clinton avoided the lawyerly details that have usually accompanied her discussion of the email issue, which her campaign staff has warned her sounds to voters like she is splitting hairs.

CHAMPION OF THE LITTLE GUY?

Republican vice presidential candidate Mike Pence, center, waits for the start of the debate. From left are Melania Trump, Ivanka Trump, Pence, Karen Pence and retired Gen. Michael Flynn.

Republican vice presidential candidate Mike Pence, center, waits for the start of the debate. From left are Melania Trump, Ivanka Trump, Pence, Karen Pence and retired Gen. Michael Flynn. Evan Vucci/Associated Press

From the beginning, Clinton’s strategy seemed in part to be to goad Trump to respond intemperately. Early on, she reminded the audience that “Donald was very fortunate,” to the tune of what she said was a $14 million loan from Trump’s father. Her father was a small businessman, Clinton noted.

Trump, who is famously sensitive to suggestions that he owes his success to anyone else, took the bait. He used part of his next chance to speak to say he had received only a “small loan.”

The exchange may seem petty, but it invokes central themes of the election, including the economic health of the middle class and which candidate is on the side of the little guy.

Clinton continued to press that case, charging that Trump took advantage of his workers and contractors who helped build his real estate assets.

“I have met a lot of the people who were stiffed by you and your businesses, Donald,” she said. “I’ve met dishwashers, painters, architects, glass installers, marble installers, drapery installers, like my dad was, who you refused to pay when they finished the work that you asked them to do.”

Clinton cited an architect who designed the clubhouse at one of his golf courses yet was not paid all he was owed. Trump retorted: “Maybe he didn’t do a good job and I was unsatisfied with his work.”

Trump went on to laud the achievements of his company, repeatedly saying his success reflects the kind of the thinking the nation needed in its political leaders.

In another exchange, Trump seemed rattled as Clinton accused him of saying that climate change “is a hoax, perpetrated by the Chinese.”

“I do not say that, I do not say that,” Trump interjected, shaking his head.

Donald Trump speaks during Monday's presidential debate with Hillary Clinton at Hofstra University in Hempstead, N.Y. Associated Press/Patrick Semansky

Donald Trump speaks during Monday’s presidential debate with Hillary Clinton at Hofstra University in Hempstead, N.Y.
Patrick Semansky/Associated Press

THE TEMPERAMENT ISSUE

Trump and Clinton accused each other of not possessing the proper temperament to be president, with Trump saying Clinton is not being strong enough, and Clinton saying Trump is too easily taunted.

Clinton criticized Trump for saying that U.S. Navy ships should open fire on Iranian boats that had taunted them in the Persian Gulf. She re-used a familiar line from earlier in this campaign: “His cavalier attitude about nuclear weapons is so deeply troubling. … A man who can be provoked by a tweet should not have their finger anywhere near the nuclear codes.”

“That one’s getting a little bit old,” Trump said.

“It’s a good one,” Clinton said.

Earlier, Trump had accused Clinton of going along with Obama’s foreign policy – criticizing her, in particular, for the nuclear deal with Iran, which he said had empowered Iran to become a major power and U.S. adversary.

“We lose on everything,” Trump said, striking a theme that he hit a number of times, on subjects ranging from trade to the national debt to cyberattacks to military rivalries.

Trump criticized the NATO military alliance, repeating a charge that U.S. allies in that alliance are not paying enough for the defense the U.S. provides.

“The 28 countries in NATO, many of them aren’t paying their fair share. And that bothers me,” Trump said. When he made similar comments weeks earlier, Trump was criticized for undermining the West’s primary military alliance.

In another part of the debate, Trump referred to cyberattacks on the Democratic National Committee, which revealed internal emails embarrassing to Clinton and her supporters.

“I don’t think anybody knows it was Russia that broke into the DNC. She says Russia, Russia, Russia,” Trump said. “It could also be somebody sitting on their bed, that weighs 400 pounds.”

Trump has been accused of being too friendly to Putin.

Trump said that African-Americans and Hispanics in U.S. cities are “living in hell” because the cities are so violent. He said he would restore “law and order,” in part by using the aggressive stop-and-frisk enforcement tactics once employed by New York City police.

“Secretary Clinton doesn’t want to use a couple of words, and that’s ‘law’ and ‘order.’ We need law and order. If we don’t have it, we’re not going to have a country,” Trump said. “We need law and order in our country.”

Holt told Trump that stop-and-frisk tactics had been ruled unconstitutional because it disproportionately targeted blacks and Hispanics.

“No, you’re wrong,” Trump said, blaming a judge who was biased against police, and blaming a New York City administration for giving up on the case. “The argument is that we have to take the guns away from these people. . . . These are people that are bad people,” he said.

This was the first of three debates between Clinton and Trump sponsored by the nonpartisan Commission on Presidential Debates; the other two are scheduled Oct. 9 in St. Louis and Oct. 19 in Las Vegas. The vice presidential nominees, Democrat Tim Kaine and Republican Mike Pence, will face off once, on Oct. 4 in Farmville, Virginia.

The third-party candidates did not qualify to participate in the debate because they did not meet a minimum polling threshold. Libertarian Party nominee Gary Johnson, who is positioned to be a potential spoiler in many states, and Green Party nominee Jill Stein both made appearances on campus Monday for media interviews. Stein staged a protest and at one point was ushered off campus by security because she did not have necessary credentials.

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Trump supporter gets warning against trespassing at Colby College http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/26/trump-supporter-gets-notice-for-trespassing-at-colby-college/ http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/26/trump-supporter-gets-notice-for-trespassing-at-colby-college/#comments Tue, 27 Sep 2016 02:18:18 +0000 http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/26/trump-supporter-gets-notice-for-trespassing-at-colby-college/ WATERVILLE — A city resident who says his political signs supporting Donald Trump for president were unjustly removed from a public right-of-way near Colby College was later warned by police for trespassing.

Todd Michaud wrote in a Facebook message to the Morning Sentinel that he had put up signs in support of Trump on the rights-of-way around the Colby College campus on Saturday. Michaud noticed the signs were missing Sunday around 12:30 p.m., according to the Waterville Police Department.

Apparently reasoning that the college had removed the signs from the right-of-way – which is at the intersection of Armstrong Road and Washington Street – Michaud went to Colby College security to ask for his signs back.

Things got “a little heated,” said Colby College spokeswoman Kate Carlisle, so security officials called Waterville police.

Colby College told police they didn’t remove Michaud’s signs, and police couldn’t find any of Michaud’s signs.

“He gave Colby security a pretty hard time,” said Deputy Chief Bill Bonney, of the Waterville Police Department, adding that Michaud was reportedly “aggressive” with security staff.

Michaud, who can be seen on his Facebook page posing beside a large “Hillary for Prison 2016” sign on a trailer, did not immediately return requests for comment Monday.

Waterville police issued a criminal trespassing notice to Michaud and warned him not to return to Colby College. The notice was given because of the way he treated the security officers, Bonney said, not because he put up signs.

Police also took a theft report from Michaud regarding his missing signs. A person convicted of stealing a political sign can face a fine of up to $250.

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First presidential debate, checking the facts http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/26/first-presidential-debate-checking-the-facts/ http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/26/first-presidential-debate-checking-the-facts/#comments Tue, 27 Sep 2016 02:15:31 +0000 http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/26/first-presidential-debate-checking-the-facts/ WASHINGTON — A look at some of the claims in the debate and how they compare with the facts:

CLINTON, denying Trump’s accusation that she called the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal the “gold standard” of trade agreements: “I did say I hoped it would be a good deal.”

THE FACTS: Trump is correct. As secretary of state, Clinton called the deal that was taking shape the “gold standard” of trade agreements, in a 2012 trip to Australia, and championed the agreement in other venues around the world. She did not merely express the hope it would turn out well.

Clinton flip-flopped into opposing the trade deal in the Democratic primary when facing Bernie Sanders, who was strongly opposed to it.

TRUMP, when Clinton accused him of calling climate change a hoax invented by the Chinese: “I did not say that.”

THE FACTS: Yes he did, in the form of a 2012 tweet: “The concept of global warming was created by and for the Chinese in order to make U.S. manufacturing non-competitive.” He later claimed he was kidding, but he’s also repeated the claim that climate change is a hoax, and one that benefits China.

CLINTON: As part of a list of economy-building moves, called for “making college debt free so more young people can get their education.”

THE FACTS: Clinton has proposed making college tuition free for in-state students who go to a public college or university. But tuition free doesn’t equate to debt free.

Under her plan, the government would pay for in-state tuition at public colleges and universities for students from families earning less than $125,000 a year. That would leave students still bearing the cost of room and board, which makes up more than half of the average $18,943 sticker price at a four-year public university, according to the College Board.

Experts worry about other effects: Will colleges raise tuition once the government starts paying, increasing the cost to taxpayers? Will more students flock to public colleges because of the subsidy, also raising costs?

TRUMP: “You don’t learn a lot from tax returns.”

THE FACTS: Donald Trump was explaining why he won’t release his tax returns, although numerous other presidential candidates have done. And yes, one can learn quite a bit. Tax returns might not answer every question about Trump’s finances, but they’d provide vital information about his wealth, taxes paid, tax avoidance efforts, exact amounts of real estate holdings and charitable donations that can’t be gleaned from any other source. For these reasons, every major party candidate for the last 40 years has released at least a few years of recent tax returns.

TRUMP: “My father gave me a small loan in 1975…”

THE FACTS: Trump got a whole lot more than a small loan. Aside from a $1 million financing from his father, Trump received loan guarantees, bailouts and a drawdown from his future inheritance. Reporter Tim O’Brien noted in a 2005 book that Trump not only drew an additional $10 million from his future inheritance during hard times, but also inherited a share of his father’s real estate holdings, which were worth hundreds of millions when they were eventually sold off.

TRUMP: President Barack Obama “has doubled (the national debt) in almost eight years. … When we have $20 trillion in debt, and our country is a mess.”

THE FACTS: Trump’s expressed concern about the national debt obscures that his own policies would increase it by much more than Clinton’s, according to the nonpartisan Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget.

Trump’s tax cuts would increase the deficit by $5.3 trillion over 10 years, the group found, while Clinton’s proposals would boost the deficit by $200 billion. Those increases are on top of an already-projected increase of about $9 trillion over the next decade, according to the Congressional Budget Office. By 2026, debt held by the public would total $23.3 trillion under Clinton’s plans, and $28.4 trillion under Trump.

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Obama supports hands-off approach to regulating driverless vehicles http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/26/obama-supports-driverless-vehicles/ http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/26/obama-supports-driverless-vehicles/#comments Tue, 27 Sep 2016 01:16:29 +0000 http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/26/obama-supports-driverless-vehicles/ Automated cars have the backing of President Obama, who’s signed off on what’s largely been a hands-off approach to regulating the burgeoning industry, Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx says.

The U.S. is allowing road trials by the likes of Alphabet Inc. and Uber Technologies Inc. because real-world testing is critical to the technology’s acceptance, and for companies and regulators to understand its potential, Foxx said in an interview Saturday. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration last week released guidelines for the industry that stopped short of offering prescriptive rules that car and tech companies have to follow.

“The president is a techie at heart,” Foxx said in Karuizawa, Japan, while attending a meeting of G7 transport ministers. Foxx said Obama has given him “wide latitude” in figuring out “how to improve mobility, raise the level of safety and create more choice and equity in how transportation is accessible to people.”

The Obama administration’s embrace of the technology stands in contrast with the approach taken by China, which surpassed the U.S. as the world’s largest auto market in 2009. The government warned automakers in July against testing their self-driving vehicles before regulations are finalized. That’s been a setback to companies including Chongqing Changan Automobile Co., Baidu Inc. and Zhejiang Geely Holding Group Co., which have urged China’s government to speed up its rule-making process.

“Real-world testing will teach manufacturers as well as us regulators more about what works well and what doesn’t work well” and is a “critical part of the path to autonomous vehicle acceptance,” Foxx said. “We also believe that can be done with a high relative level of safety.”

Alphabet’s Google self-driving car program racked up about 1.97 million miles of autonomous-mode testing near its Mountain View, California, headquarters and three other U.S. cities through August. Uber last month started allowing customers in downtown Pittsburgh to summon Volvo XC90 sport utility vehicles capable of automated driving.

The technology hasn’t entirely escaped scrutiny. NHTSA and the National Transportation Safety board are investigating a May 7 fatal crash involving Tesla Motors Inc.’s Autopilot driver-assist system. Chief Executive Officer Elon Musk has said a software update introduced this month may have been able to prevent the death of the driver.

Highway fatalities climbed by 7.2 percent, the highest one-year increase in almost half a century, to 35,092 last year, according to the Transportation Department.

While NHTSA has emphasized the potential of automated vehicles, the hands-off approach may not stay for good. NHTSA said within its guidelines last week that it may eventually seek authority for a pre-market approval system, in which the regulator would have to sign off on the safety of automated vehicles before they’re sold.

This would be a “wholesale structural change” from the existing regulatory approach, in which automakers self-certify the safety of their cars, the agency said.

“There’s obviously an issue around acceptance and trusting the technology, and one way perhaps that the confidence level can be increased is by having more rigor on the front end of a product coming into the marketplace,” Foxx said. “It’s certainly a question we felt strongly enough needed to be placed in the document.”

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Commentary: Golf was lucky to have a man like Palmer http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/26/commentary-golf-was-lucky-to-have-a-man-like-palmer/ http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/26/commentary-golf-was-lucky-to-have-a-man-like-palmer/#comments Tue, 27 Sep 2016 01:14:27 +0000 http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/26/commentary-golf-was-lucky-to-have-a-man-like-palmer/ As the statements poured out in the wake of Arnold Palmer’s death on Sunday night – ranging from 23-year-old Jordan Spieth to 76-year-old Jack Nicklaus to the President of the United States – I was struck by one thing: Almost no one said anything about Palmer’s golf.

It was all about the man.

Palmer, who was 87 when he died in a Pittsburgh hospital, was a great player: a seven-time major champion who won 62 times on the PGA Tour, fifth on the career list. But Palmer wasn’t one of the most iconic athletes of the past 100 years because of what he did on the golf course, but because of what he did off the golf course.

No one understood and embraced the responsibilities of stardom the way Arnold Palmer did. No one ever signed more autographs – never a scrawl, but a very clear signature. No one was more accessible or open with the media – all media, ranging from TV networks to high school kids – who wanted to ask a few questions.

Jack Nicklaus and Tiger Woods are the greatest players in golf history. Palmer was the most important: He made golf a sport for TV, for corporate America and for millions of fans – his “army.”

Palmer had an almost unique gift: He could make anyone he was talking to feel as if they were the most important person he had ever met. Everyone who ever met Palmer has a story about their first encounter.

Here’s mine: In 1994, while researching, “A Good Walk Spoiled,” I asked Doc Giffin, Palmer’s right-hand man for 53 years, whether Palmer might have some time to talk during the annual PGA Tour event he hosted at Bay Hill. The next day, Doc asked me if I could go to Arnold’s house for breakfast later in the week.

When we shook hands at the front door, Palmer said, “So, Doc tells me you went to Duke.”

I said that was correct. Palmer smiled, shook his head and said, “So, I guess you couldn’t get into Wake Forest.”

His alma mater . . . of course.

Two hours later, he had supplied me with enough material for several chapters.

Not wanting to overstay my welcome, I thanked him for his time, his hospitality and for breakfast.

“You got enough?” he asked. “I’m going down to my workshop to work on some clubs if you want to stick around a while longer.”

That became another 90 minutes.

Palmer did that for everyone.

More than anything, Palmer always understood that fame and fortune aren’t a one-way street. Prior to the 1997 Masters, Palmer took Tiger Woods to lunch in the champion’s locker room at Augusta National. Woods was still a few days away from his first Masters victory – so Palmer hosted him.

Woods was singing a song that went something like, “It’s just not fair. I can’t be a normal 21-year-old.”

“You’re right,” Palmer said. “Normal 21-year-olds don’t have $50 million in the bank.”

Palmer always connected with young players. As with Woods, he never coddled them. He told them exactly what he thought about their games, the way they behaved, even the way they looked.

In 1996, when Paul Goydos won at Bay Hill – and thus qualified for the Masters – he asked Palmer during the awards ceremony if he could play a practice round with him at Augusta.

“Only if you lose that ridiculous beard,” Palmer said. “You look awful.”

Goydos lost the beard and asked that it be air-brushed out of his champions portrait that hangs in the Bay Hill clubhouse. “I didn’t want Mr. Palmer to walk by it and think I looked ridiculous,” he said.

This past March, a number of players changed their schedules to play Bay Hill because they knew Palmer was ill and it might be their last chance to pay tribute.

Twenty-five years ago, Palmer made the cut at Bay Hill – for the final time – at the age of 61. That night, Peter Jacobsen went to a bakery and asked for a sheet cake for 100 people.

“I need it first thing in the morning,” Jacobsen said.

“Monday is the earliest I can do it,” the baker said.

“It’s for Arnold Palmer.”

“We open at 8 tomorrow. Is that soon enough?”

When Jacobsen presented the cake to Palmer that afternoon during a rain delay with the entire field in the locker room, Palmer cried. Then he cut a piece for every player.

“I cried because Peter and all the guys were saying to me that I was still one of them,” Palmer said. “That meant a lot.”

He never stopped being one of them.

On a searingly hot June day in 1994, Palmer played his last U.S. Open round. He was clearly exhausted coming down the stretch, but it never stopped him from returning every wave, every, ‘go Arnie,’ every cheer of any kind, with a smile, a wave, a “thanks,” or “how’s it going?” Every one of those people got a look in the eye and the famous smile.

They all could go home and told their friends, “Arnold Palmer said hello to me today.”

Because he did.

As Palmer walked up the 18th fairway that afternoon, many players came out of the clubhouse to stand behind the green and join the throngs. On the 10th tee – adjacent to the green –players refused to tee off so they could watch.

When Palmer made his final putt, playing partner Rocco Mediate, like Palmer a blue-collar kid from western Pennsylvania, leaned down, pointed at the thousands around the green and said softly, “All this is because of you.”

A few minutes later, when Palmer came into a packed interview room, he was overcome by tears on several occasions. He tried to talk – and stopped. He tried again – and stopped. Finally, he stood to leave. Every single person in the room jumped to their feet and applauded.

It was completely unprofessional. No cheering the press box. And yet, it was absolutely the right thing to do because no one ever did more for the media than Palmer.

A handful of us trailed him back to the locker room. There, he composed himself and talked for another 20 minutes.

“I shot 81 today,” he said softly. “I was terrible. In any other sport, I’d have been booed – should have been booed. Instead, I get cheered.”

He paused for a moment. “How lucky have I been to have played this game for all these years?”

Actually, the luck was ours.

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Arnold Palmer won over Maine fans as he won at Purpoodock Club in 1986 http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/26/palmers-impact-felt-in-maine/ http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/26/palmers-impact-felt-in-maine/#comments Tue, 27 Sep 2016 01:00:27 +0000 http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/26/palmers-impact-felt-in-maine/ CAPE ELIZABETH — Thirty years ago Arnold Palmer could still strike the ball with the best players on the Senior PGA Tour. Putting was the problem. Palmer wasn’t about to change his famous knock-kneed style after winning 62 PGA events, seven majors and nine more titles on the Senior Tour.

Instead, he changed putters. At least that’s what he was doing at Purpoodock Club in 1986 before the third round of the Unionmutual Seniors Golf Classic, according to club member Jonathan Brogan.

“The pro then, Bryce Roberts, obviously had a bunch of putters sitting around and Arnold would grab a handful of putters and he would go out to the practice green with five different putters,” said Brogan, 57. “He’d take a few putts with these five different putters and then decide which one would get auditioned for the day. So here he is leading the tournament and he’s got all these different putters he’s trying out.”

Palmer, who died Sunday at the age of 87, must have found the right putter (or putters) that weekend.

Palmer earned what would be his next-to-last tournament victory and $38,000 at Purpoodock Club on Sept. 28, 1986, besting an invitational field of top senior professionals by three shots with rounds of 65-67-68 and gaining new fans to Arnie’s Army.

“I was always a Jack Nicklaus fan because I was too young when Arnold was at his peak,” Brogan said. “And then when I saw him play out here and saw how he reacted and how he interacted with the crowds, you could see it in two seconds. He was amazing. He just had a way of looking at people that made everyone think he was looking right at them. People talk about charisma or however you describe it but he had it. The crowd loved him and he loved them.”

Palmer, who had gone nearly two years without a victory, acknowledged the estimated crowd of over 10,000 that packed the tight layout.

“The fans in this area have been fantastic,” Palmer told television station WCSH that day. “They showed up in force and I think that is great.”

Current Purpoodock pro Tony Decker was in the throng, a teenager who had been newly introduced to golf.

“He just seemed to have a presence about him and really was engaging with the gallery and it seemed like people were always rooting for him,” Decker said. “In a sport where you never root against anybody, people were definitely pulling for him.”

Palmer didn’t disappoint. He played aggressively, intent on expanding his first-round lead.

Palmer's three straight eagles on the 16th hole at Purpoodock are commemorated.

Palmer’s three straight eagles on the 16th hole at Purpoodock are commemorated. Ben McCanna/Staff Photographer

Palmer eagled the par-5 16th hole all three days. That feat is now commemorated by a bronze plaque beside the 16th tee, which was dedicated in 2005 with approval from Palmer. The current plaque is actually the second one that was completed.

Brogan said the first attempt had a profile image of Palmer that did not do him justice and the manufacturer agreed to make a second one

“When he played at Purpoodock he was still dashing even though he was getting up there in years,” said Tom Chard, the former longtime Portland Press Herald golf writer who covered the event. “He had the swagger still and obviously he could still play a lick.”

Palmer’s most memorable shot in the final round was his second on the newly reconfigured par-5 second hole.

“It wasn’t an ideal position but it was far enough back for him to go over the trees,” Chard said. “He put it on the green and he was on in two, which is kind of unheard of.”

“The safe shot is to wedge it up and go for birdie. He’s looking at it, looking at it, and he takes his 4-wood out and drives it right over this big oak tree and onto the green,” Brogan said. “The crowd went crazy and he was just fired up.”

Palmer missed his eagle putt by an inch. After the round he explained his decision.

Arnie's Army gained a new group of fans when Arnold Palmer won the Unionmutual Seniors Golf Classic in September 1986 at Purpoodock Club in Cape Elizabeth. Palmer thrilled the crowd with his daring playing and charming style.

Arnie’s Army gained a new group of fans when Arnold Palmer won the Unionmutual Seniors Golf Classic in September 1986 at Purpoodock Club in Cape Elizabeth. Palmer thrilled the crowd with his daring playing and charming style. File photo/Jack Milton

“If I had dumped the ball in the middle of the trees I would have been in trouble. I knew I could hit the shot that was required,” Palmer said. “Like I said before, the idea is to get as big a lead as possible. That’s the best way to do it.”

The Unionmutual tournament, which was not affiliated with the Senior PGA Tour, was held for three years, 1984-86. It was the brainchild of then club president Ralph “Bud” Deangelis and Colin Hampton, an avid golfer and the president of Union Mutual. The tournament invited top senior pros and rewarded the top salespeople at Union Mutual (now Unum) with the opportunity to play in a pro-am.

Palmer played all three years.

“The first year it was a match play tournament and Palmer lost in the first round so he was out after a day. He was obviously the draw,” Chard said. “The next year they went to three rounds of stroke play to insure Arnold stayed all three days.”

After the pros’ first visit in 1984, tournament organizers encouraged the course to change the aforementioned second hole from a par 4 to a par 5.

“The pros wanted a par 5 on the front nine, which the members did, too,” Brogan said. “In the process they also turned a weak third hole into a good third hole. It was really a win-win for the course.

Standing next to the 16th tee Monday, Decker noted that 30 years ago to the day was the opening round of Palmer’s Purpoodock win.

“Not only did he shape the game but, in a certain way, just his presence here shaped our golf course,” Decker said.

 

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Story of 5-year-old living in Portland woods prompts flood of offers to help http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/26/story-of-5-year-old-living-in-portland-woods-prompts-flood-of-offers-to-help/ http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/26/story-of-5-year-old-living-in-portland-woods-prompts-flood-of-offers-to-help/#comments Tue, 27 Sep 2016 00:54:23 +0000 http://www.pressherald.com/2016/09/26/story-of-5-year-old-living-in-portland-woods-prompts-flood-of-offers-to-help/ The story of a 5-year-old girl living in Portland’s woods prompted dozens of readers of the Maine Sunday Telegram to offer her family clothes, toys, furniture and other support.

Jason Libby, a 40-year-old Windham resident, has twin 6-year-old girls and a 4-year-old son and was among those seeking a way to help Arianna and her family Monday. Libby said he was moved to tears by the story, which he read shortly after putting his kids to sleep.

“My kids are about the same age. I was thinking about all the things we do every day that’s so easy because we have a home,” Libby said, noting how Arianna was unable to brush her teeth in the woods because they didn’t have water. “It was really hard for me to think of this little girl not having these things.”

Sally Richardson, a 67-year-old grandmother who lives in Stonington, said she couldn’t help but think of her four grandchildren.

“The mother and father appear to be trying. There’s all kinds of obstacles in their way, but they’re trying,” Richardson said. “This child is an innocent child.”

Many readers wondered how society could allow children to be homeless. “It was … infuriating and sad when I read that,” Richardson said.

While some readers said they wanted to ask the family how they can help, others hoped to make specific gifts, such as a bed or toys, for Arianna. The offers were being referred directly to the family.

Meanwhile, Arianna’s family continues to settle into a new apartment in Auburn, where she is enjoying kindergarten. Her mother, Chrissy Chavez, is looking for work while Chavez’s boyfriend, Troy Jethro, is now working nights in a nearby warehouse to support the family.

In the last two weeks, the family has received a small dining room table and a dresser, which all three share, Chavez said.

Otherwise, they are still without furniture. “We’re picking up little pieces here and there when we can,” she said.

Chavez said she had never been homeless before coming to Maine during the summer. She was surprised by the stigma associated with homeless people here, and hoped her family’s story would reduce that stigma.

“I’m glad it is affecting people in a positive way. That’s the only reason I’m comfortable with this,” Chavez said. “No matter what the situation, you have the right to be treated the same way as another person.”

Arianna is excited to go to school every day, her 38-year-old mom said. Jethro bought her a pet guinea pig, named Rosie.

“Arianna is loving school now,” Chavez said. “She got her little friends. She’s doing excellent now.”

The family came to Portland from Florida looking for a new start. Jethro, who is 34 and finished a three-year prison sentence for felony drug offenses in 2014, said he was looking to escape a life of drug abuse so he could be a father to Arianna. They chose Maine because Jethro planned to get a job on a lobster boat. That never happened and they were kicked out of an apartment they had been renting because the building had been sold.

After losing their Portland apartment, the family went to the city’s homeless shelter, which is frequently overcrowded. At the time, one of the city’s overflow shelters was an office, where fire codes required people to sit in chairs all night. That practice has since been changed and city officials are looking to revamp their shelter services.

Jethro was issued a no-trespass order when he complained about the conditions and made a video, violating shelter privacy rules.

The family ended up living with dozens of other homeless people in an illegal encampment behind Lowe’s on Brighton Avenue. As police planned to clear the encampment last month, the family secured housing in Auburn with the help of a state social worker and a tiny nonprofit, the Maine Homeless Veterans Alliance.

EDITOR’S NOTE: Comments have been disabled on this story because of personal attacks.

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