July 1, 2013

'Antiques Roadshow' keeps on trucking for PBS

In its 18th season, it's still public television's highest-rated series, and has now visited 47 of the 50 states. Maine has yet to appear.

The Associated Press

ANAHEIM, Calif. — The items arrive by the thousands, borne on furniture dollies, in Radio Flyer wagons or nestled carefully in owners' arms. The hodge-podge parade consists of paintings, teapots, firearms, mannequins decked out in military uniforms and more. Much more.

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This June 22, 2013 photo released by PBS shows a man named Joe holding a Max Brother prop duck during the taping of the popular appraisal show "Antiques Roadshow," in Anaheim, Calif. Top-rated PBS series "Antiques Roadshow" is on the move, taping programs in eight U.S. cities for its upcoming 18th season. (AP Photo/PBS)

click image to enlarge

This June 22, 2013 photo released by PBS shows Ted Trotta, of Trotta-Bono, Ltd., right, looking at Lisa as she reacts about information about her Spontoon Tomahawk Pipe during the taping of the popular appraisal show "Antiques Roadshow," in Anaheim, Calif. Top-rated PBS series "Antiques Roadshow" is on the move, taping programs in eight U.S. cities for its upcoming 18th season. (AP Photo/PBS)

Grade-schoolers have show-and-tell for their treasures. The adult counterpart is PBS' "Antiques Roadshow," which has become an institution as it approaches its 18th season and holds fast as public television's highest-rated series.

That's right: It's No. 1. Not glamorous, romantic "Downton Abbey," but homespun and earnest "Antiques Roadshow," where Civil War firearms, Tiffany lamps and autographed baseball cards are the stars. Even Kevin Bacon watches it, which he admits in an on-air PBS promo.

As the show hopscotches from U.S. city to city, each stop draws some 6,000 people and the one or two possessions they believe are — or, wishful thinking, might be — worth a few minutes of TV airtime and a lot of money.

But what they're most eager for is background on their items and validation that their family heirloom or garage-sale find is special, said longtime executive producer Marsha Bemko. It's rare that any piece featured on "Roadshow," no matter how valuable, ends up being sold.

"People are so excited about what they own and so eager to learn about it," she said. "Most walk out knowing more than when they came in."

And the audience gets to share in that enlightenment. "It's a very human and universal thing to understand ourselves and our objects help us to do that," Bemko said.

As part of an eight-city tour for the new season that begins airing next January, "Roadshow" arrived recently in Anaheim, southeast of Los Angeles and home to Disneyland. For one busy day, the gray cement floor of a convention center became a field of dreams.

Maybe that black-and-white drawing discovered hiding behind granddad's painting will turn out to be a rare 16th-century century print of "The Crucifixion" by Tintoretto (It did, with an estimated post-restoration value of up to $15,000).

"I've always debated with mom whether it was real," said its owner, 36-year-old Jason (PBS asked that last names be withheld for privacy and security). He figured it had to be a fake because a date, 1569, was carefully noted in one corner.

What did he expect to hear when he tells his mother the news? "I told you so," he said, smiling.

Then there was the piece plucked from the trash in the 1970s. An appraiser sized it up as folk art by Joseph Cornell, one of his famed shadow-box displays, and worth up to $150,000 at auction if authenticated.

From the sublime to the cheerfully ridiculous, there was the stuffed duck that served as Groucho Marx's prop on his 1950s game show "You Bet Your Life." Purchased for $250 in 1986, an appraiser gave it an auction value of up to $12,000.

The lucky Anaheim visitors were among those who sent in 24,278 requests for 3,000 pairs of tickets distributed through a random drawing. Local public TV stations have other tickets that serve as donation premiums.

Getting in is one thing; getting on TV requires more gantlet-running.

The action starts at the so-called "triage tables," where visitors are directed to the best section and experts for their belongings: A 1930s Mickey Mouse wristwatch is sent to collectibles, for example, rather than timepieces.

(Continued on page 2)

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