February 12

Sid Caesar, comic genius of 1950s television, dies

Caesar, 91, died at his home in the Los Angeles area after a brief illness, a family spokesman said.

By Lynn Elber
The Associated Press

LOS ANGELES – Sid Caesar, the prodigiously talented pioneer of TV comedy who paired with Imogene Coca in sketches that became classics and who inspired a generation of famous writers, died early Wednesday. He was 91.

click image to enlarge

Sid Caesar, star of “Your Show of Shows,” arrives at NBC’s 75th anniversary celebration in New York. Caesar, whose sketches lit up 1950s television with zany humor, died Wednesday. He was 91.

2002 Associated Press File Photo

click image to enlarge

Sid Caesar and Imogene Coca are shown in a scene from “Your Show of Shows.”

Associated Press File Photo/NBC

Caesar died at his home in the Los Angeles area after a brief illness, family spokesman Eddy Friedfeld said.

In his two most important shows, “Your Show of Shows,” 1950-54, and “Caesar’s Hour,” 1954-57, Caesar displayed remarkable skill in pantomime, satire, mimicry, dialect and sketch comedy. And he gathered a stable of young writers who went on to worldwide fame in their own right – including Neil Simon and Woody Allen.

“The one great star that television created and who created television was Sid Caesar,” said critic Joel Siegel on the TV documentary “Hail Sid Caesar! The Golden Age Of Comedy,” which first aired in 2001.

While best known for his TV shows, which have been revived on DVD in recent years, he also had success on Broadway and occasional film appearances, notably in “It’s a Mad Mad Mad Mad World.”

If the typical funnyman was tubby or short and scrawny, Caesar was tall and powerful, with a clown’s loose limbs and rubbery face, and a trademark mole on his left cheek.

But Caesar never went in for clowning or jokes. He wasn’t interested. He insisted that the laughs come from the everyday.

“Real life is the true comedy,” he said in a 2001 interview with The Associated Press. “Then everybody knows what you’re talking about.” Caesar brought observational comedy to TV before the term, or such latter-day practitioners as Jerry Seinfeld, were even born.

In one celebrated routine, Caesar impersonated a gumball machine; in another, a baby; in another, a ludicrously overemotional guest on a parody of “This Is Your Life.”

He played an unsuspecting moviegoer getting caught between feuding lovers in a theater. He dined at a health food restaurant, where the first course was the bouquet in the vase on the table. He was interviewed as an avant-garde jazz musician who seemed happily high on something.

The son of Jewish immigrants, Caesar was a wizard at spouting melting-pot gibberish that parodied German, Russian, French and other languages. His Professor was the epitome of goofy Germanic scholarship.

Some compared him to Charlie Chaplin for his success at combining humor with touches of pathos.

“As wild an idea as you get, it won’t go over unless it has a believable basis to start off with,” he told The Associated Press in 1955. “The viewers have to see you basically as a person first, and after that you can go on into left field.”

Caesar performed with such talents as Howard Morris and Nanette Fabray, but his most celebrated collaborator was the brilliant Coca, his “Your Show of Shows” co-star.

Coca and Caesar performed skits that satirized the everyday – marital spats, inane advertising, strangers meeting and speaking in clichés, a parody of the Western “Shane” in which the hero was “Strange.” They staged a water-logged spoof of the love scene in “From Here to Eternity.” ‘’The Hickenloopers” husband-and-wife skits became a staple.

“The chemistry was perfect, that’s all,” Coca, who died in 2001, once said. “We never went out together; we never see each other socially. But for years we worked together from 10 in the morning to 6 or 7 at night every day of the week. What made it work is that we found the same things funny.”

Caesar worked closely with his writing staff as they found inspiration in silent movies, foreign films and the absurdities of ‘50s postwar prosperity.

(Continued on page 2)

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