SOUP TO NUTS

February 24, 2010

Eat your breakfast

By Meredith Goad mgoad@pressherald.com
Staff Writer

(Continued from page 1)

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Paul Dyer, executive chef at the Porthole, prepares eggs Florentine, which is “probably our number one-selling dish right now on our menu,” he said.

Tim Greenway/Staff Photographer

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The Porthole has high hopes for its eggs Florentine, the Portland restaurant’s entry in the Incredible Breakfast Cook-off, to be held March 5 at the Sea Dog Brewing Company in South Portland in conjunction with Maine Restaurant Week.

Tim Greenway/Staff Photographer

IF YOU GO

THE INCREDIBLE BREAKFAST COOK-OFF

WHEN: 7 to 9:30 a.m. March 5

WHERE: Sea Dog Brewing Company, 125 Western Ave., South Portland

HOW MUCH: Tickets are $12 each or two for $20, and may be purchased through the Maine Restaurant Week Web site:
www.mainerestaurantweek.com

INFO: 775-2126, Ext. 122
 

WHAT IS RESTAURANT WEEK?

THE IDEA of Restaurant Week began in 1992 in New York, when restaurants offered three-course lunches for $19.92.

THE CONCEPT has since spread all over the country. Maine held its first restaurant week in 2009, and a year later, there are about 100 restaurants from 25 communities participating in the event. RestaurantWeekME has more than 2,880 fans on Facebook and nearly 370 followers on Twitter.

MAINE CHEFS participating in Restaurant Week, which begins Monday and runs through March 10, will prepare three-course dinners for $20.10, $30.10 and $40.10, not including beverages, tax and tip. Diners typically get to pick from three choices per course. Reservations are recommended.

FOR A LIST of restaurants and menus, go to mainerestaurantweek.com.

 

WHAT’S NEW


THIS YEAR, in addition to the wide variety of dinner menus you’ll find during Restaurant Week, 10 Maine restaurants will be serving three-course lunches for $15.10:

• Academe Maine Brasserie & Tavern, Kennebunk

• Bull Feeney’s, Portland

• Cook’s Lobster House, Bailey Island

• David’s Restaurant, Portland

• El Rayo Taqueria, Portland

• JR Maxwell & Co., Bath

• Linda Bean’s Perfect Maine Lobster Roll, Portland

• Slate’s Restaurant, Hallowell

• Sunday River Brew Club, Bethel

• Thomaston Cafe, Thomaston

YOU’LL BE GETTING a lot more than a sandwich, chips and soda for your fifteen bucks. Here’s the lunch menu from David’s Restaurant in Monument Square:

APPETIZERS

Choice 1 – Clam chowder: David’s recipe with thyme, brown sugar and bacon
Choice 2 – Bruschetta with artichoke and peppers fresh mozzarella, Greek olives, basil and balsamic glaze
Choice 3 – Soup of the day or garden salad

ENTREES

Choice 1 – Mixed grilled jumbo Gulf shrimp wrapped around a large native sea scallop, paired with a grilled “Portland” sirloin
Choice 2 – Mediterranean-style grilled tuna salad artichokes, green beans, Greek olives, peppers and Greek vinaigrette
Choice 3 – Exotic mushroom ravioli with ricotta cheese, forest mushrooms, leeks, shallots, oven-dried tomato, arugula, goat cheese, Madeira sauce and truffle oil

DESSERTS

Choice 1 – Creme brulee
Choice 2 – Cheesecake
Choice 3 – David’ s cookie and ice cream made with white and dark chocolate chip granola cookies, vanilla ice cream and chocolate sauce
 

WHAT’S COOKING

HERE’S THE MENU for The Incredible Breakfast Cook-Off:

Sea Dog Brewing Co., South Portland – Maine Lobster Benedict

Bayou Kitchen, Portland – Huevos rancheros tortilla

Dysart’s, Hermon – Stuffed French toast made with Dysart’s homemade bread

Maine Diner, Wells – Maine blueberry pancakes

The Good Table, Cape Elizabeth – Creme brulee French toast

Miss Portland Diner, Portland – Homemade corned beef hash

The Porthole, Portland – Eggs Florentine with a smoky bacon cream sauce

The Farmer’s Table, Portland – Sweet potato fritter with poached egg

Sea Glass Restaurant, Cape Elizabeth – Crab Benedict

Moody’s Diner, Waldoboro – Donuts

Congdon’s, Wells – Ham strata

Becky’s, Portland – TBA
 

COCKTAIL HOUR

ARE YOU MORE of a night person? Then make it cocktails instead of crab Benedict.

ON MONDAY, the opening night of Maine Restaurant Week, Maine’s bartenders will be shaking and stirring their best cocktail creations at the Portland Museum of Art, 7 Congress Square Plaza.

THE CATCH? All the drinks will be made with Maine’s own Cold River Vodka.

FROM 5:30 TO 7 P.M., guests will be able to sample the drinks and vote on their favorites. Hors d’oeuvres will be supplied by Aurora Provisions. The winner of the contest will be announced at 7:30 p.m.

PARTICIPATING RESTAURANTS include Azure, Backstreet Bistro, Back Bay Grill, the Camden Harbour Inn, Fuel, the Hilton Garden Inn, Hugo’s, Local 188, Old Port Sea Grill, Vignola, The Salt Exchange, Solo Bistro, and Walter’s.

TICKETS COST $25 and are available through www.mainerestaurantweek.com. Like the breakfast cook-off, the proceeds will go to the Preble Street Resource Center.

NO ONE UNDER 21 years old will be admitted.

IN THE WORDS OF KAFKA ...

DOESN’T IT SEEM like all your life you’ve heard the mantra “breakfast is the most important meal of the day?” It’s a phrase often tossed around by moms, doctors, nutritionists and anyone else who’s trying to get you to scramble a couple of eggs or down a piping hot bowl of oatmeal before heading off for school or work.

WELL, MAYBE INSTEAD of reading the back of the cereal box the next time you sit down to the breakfast table, you can peruse those words as they were originally written – by Franz Kafka.

IN KAFKA’S MASTERPIECE, “Metamorphosis,” Gregor Samsa describes his father’s breakfast habits this way: “The washing up from breakfast lay on the table; there was so much of it because, for Gregor’s father, breakfast was the most important meal of the day and he would stretch it out for several hours as he sat reading a number of different newspapers.” In the novella, Samsa is transformed into “a monstrous vermin,” which presumably would have spoiled everyone’s appetite.

 

Dyer’s Eggs Florentine is a classic breakfast dish that begins with wilting the spinach in a pan on the stovetop. The spinach goes on top of an English muffin that’s been toasted in the oven with Swiss cheese.

Next, the eggs are poached in water that’s come to a rolling boil.

“The key to poaching eggs: Make sure you add a little bit of white vinegar to the water before you poach them,” Dyer said. “Usually you take them out at home, and they’re all stringy. You put the vinegar into the water, and what it does is coagulate the proteins of the egg, and that’s why they always come out so nice and tight.”

The smoky bacon cream sauce is Cross’ specialty. He cooks the bacon about three-quarters of the way through so that most of the fat is rendered out of it, then it goes on the charbroiler to give it a smoky flavor. Chopped onions are cooked the same way so they also get a little smokiness.

Then the onions are diced with a little garlic and celery and cooked down a bit. Cross uses white wine to deglaze the pan, then adds the bacon. Finally, he adds cream until the sauce is the right consistency, and seasons it with salt, pepper “and a couple of other secret ingredients.”

At the restaurant, the dish is plated with garnishes of smoked paprika oil and chive oil, and served with a side of home fries.

Dyer said he’s participating in the breakfast cook-off because it’s for a good cause. But he’s also hoping to draw some attention to the Porthole’s new breakfast menu, which includes his own version of huevos rancheros and a creme brulee French toast that’s made with homemade brioche and the same kind of batter he uses to make the dessert.

Many of the breakfast items that will be served at the cook-off are customer favorites, according to the participating restaurants, so it will be a good chance to sample the best local chefs have to offer in the breakfast/brunch category.

You might say that, no matter who wins, it will be a breakfast of champions.


Staff Writer Meredith Goad can be contacted at 791-6332 or at: mgoad@pressherald.com
 

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