January 13, 2013

Motherlode: Authors offer resolutions for a happier family life

By KJ DELL'ANTONIA

As I wrote around this time a year ago, I love making New Year's resolutions. For me, it's a moment to take stock of where I am, and where I want to be, and of all the things I've said I hoped to do and have or haven't done -- and why. The resolutions I fail at are always the ones I didn't really want to keep.

This year, for the first time, I hope to gather my family and persuade them to talk about what we did and didn't do well as a family this year, and to make a family resolution: Who do we want to be together in 2013? (My husband will say that he wants us to be a family that does not make New Year's resolutions.)

In that spirit, I asked authors I admire to offer one single resolution to help shape a happier family life in the year ahead.

Brene Brown, author of "Daring Greatly" and "The Gifts of Imperfection": One intention our family is setting for 2013 is to make more art. It doesn't matter if it's more photography, more painting, experimenting in the kitchen, or building the LEGO Death Star (which is our family project right now). I want to create together. It keeps us connected and spiritually grounded.

Andrew and Caitlin Friedman, authors of "Family, Inc.": Take a meeting with your partner or family. Spending just 30 minutes a week on our to-do list, schedule and brainstorming bigger decisions really helped us take control of the chaos that is working parenthood.

Po Bronson, co-author of "NurtureShock" and the forthcoming "Top Dog" (January 2013): Our resolution in our family is pretty simple: argue less, talk more. Even though in "NurtureShock" we wrote that arguing is the opposite of lying, and it is, there's a lot of arguing that's just about arguing, and we hope for less of it.

Ashley Merryman, co-author of "NurtureShock" and the forthcoming "Top Dog" (January 2013): This year, I want to sit less. You can read that as "need to exercise" -- true enough -- but sitting also means I'm spending too much time online, watching too much TV, and so on. Instead, I want to do more meaningful things with people I care about.

Bruce Feiler, "This Life" columnist for Sunday Styles and author of "The Secrets of Happy Families" (coming in February): Bribe more creatively (fewer direct rewards for good behavior; more unanticipated praise and surprise adventures). Celebrate more fully (worry less about bad moments; make more of the good). Play more often.

Madeline Levine, author of "Teach Your Children Well": I resolve to lead with my ears and not my mouth. I've yet to meet a child who feels like they've been listened to too much.

Asha Dornfest, founder of Parent Hacks and co-author of "Minimalist Parenting: Enjoy Modern Family Life More by Doing Less": Embrace the idea of course correction. When faced with a parenting decision, briefly survey your options then make the best choice you can, knowing you can recalculate your route to the destination as the situation -- and your family -- changes.

Christine Koh, founder of Boston Mamas and co-author of "Minimalist Parenting: Enjoy Modern Family Life More by Doing Less": Strive for a less frantic family calendar in 2013 by finding your "Goldilocks level of busy." Review the last couple of months of your family calendar and identify how many events or activities made your weeks feel too crazy, too slow or just right. Shoot for the "just right" number each week.

Laura Vanderkam, author of "What the Most Successful People Do on the Weekend": Think about how you want to spend your downtime. Weekends, evenings and vacations can be opportunities for adventure, but we often lose them in front of the TV because we fail to plan. In 2013, make a bucket list of the fun you want to have as a family -- then get those ideas on the calendar.

Contact KJ Dell-Antonia at:

kj.dellantonia@nytimes.com

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