May 12, 2013

Living pictures beautify exteriors

Succulents work well for open-fronted shadow boxes that add color to outside living areas.

By SARAH WOLFE The Associated Press

Looking for a fresh way to liven up your exterior walls?

click image to enlarge

Cuttings of succulents and other plants can go in varied frames for living pictures.

The Associated Press/Flora Grubb Gardens/Caitlin Atkinson

click image to enlarge

Additional Photos Below

Living pictures -- cuttings of assorted succulents woven together in everything from picture frames to pallet boxes -- have caught on among garden designers and landscapers this spring as an easy, modern way to add color and texture to an outdoor space.

"Living pictures composed of succulents have a gorgeous sculptural quality that works surprisingly well in a number of different aesthetics -- contemporary, bohemian, Southwestern and more," says Irene Edwards, executive editor of Lonny home design magazine. "They're great for urban dwellers with limited space."

Living pictures are also nearly maintenance-free (i.e. hard to kill). So even beginners or those with the blackest of thumbs can look like the master gardener of the neighborhood.

Here's how you can create your own living picture:

PICK YOUR STYLE

There are a few ways you can go.

For a larger living picture, you can use a wooden pallet, framing out the back like a shadow box. Large, do-it-yourself living wall panels are also for sale online through garden shops like San Francisco's Flora Grubb Gardens and DIG Gardens, based in Santa Cruz, Calif.

But going big right away can be daunting, and bigger also means heavier, so many newbies, like California gardening blogger Sarah Cornwall, stick with smaller picture or poster frames.

Go vintage with an antique frame or finish, or build your own out of local barn wood.

Chunky, streamlined frames like the ones Cornwall bought from Ikea give a more modern feel.

You'll also need a shadow box cut to fit the back of the frame, and wire mesh or "chicken wire" to fit over the front if you're going to make your own.

First, nail or screw the shadow box to the back of the frame. A depth of 2 to 3 inches is ideal. Set the wire mesh inside the frame and secure it with a staple gun.

TAKE CUTTINGS

Almost any succulent can be used for living pictures, though it's usually best to stick with varieties that stay small, like echeverias and sempervivums, says DIG Gardens co-owner Cara Meyers.

"It's fun to use varieties of aeoniums and sedums for their fun colors and textures, but they may need a little more maintenance, as they may start to grow out of the picture more," she says.

Cut off small buds of the succulents for cuttings, leaving a stem of at least 1/4-inch long.

No succulents to snip? You can always buy some at a nursery or trade with other gardeners.

Make sure any old bottom leaves are removed, then leave the cuttings on a tray in a cool, shaded area for a few days to form a "scab" on the ends before planting.

Set the frame mesh-side up on a table and fill with soil, using your hands to push it through the wire mesh openings.

Be sure to use cactus soil, which is coarser than potting soil for better drainage.

Some gardeners place a layer of sphagnum moss under and over the soil to hold moisture in when watering.

FILL IN WITH PLANTS

Now comes the fun and creative part.

Lay out the succulent cuttings in the design you want on a flat surface, and poke them into the wire mesh holes in your frame.

You can start either in one corner or by placing the "focal point" cuttings in first and filling in around them.

(Continued on page 2)

Were you interviewed for this story? If so, please fill out our accuracy form

Send question/comment to the editors


Additional Photos

click image to enlarge

  


Further Discussion

Here at PressHerald.com we value our readers and are committed to growing our community by encouraging you to add to the discussion. To ensure conscientious dialogue we have implemented a strict no-bullying policy. To participate, you must follow our Terms of Use.

Questions about the article? Add them below and we’ll try to answer them or do a follow-up post as soon as we can. Technical problems? Email them to us with an exact description of the problem. Make sure to include:
  • Type of computer or mobile device your are using
  • Exact operating system and browser you are viewing the site on (TIP: You can easily determine your operating system here.)