April 14, 2013

Motherlode: Sharing family stories helps us find the happy endings

By KJ DELL'ANTONIA

I've been thinking hard about family stories.

Family stories are exactly what they sound like. They're stories of our family history -- how we got here, who came before us and what mattered along the way. They're stories of our recent family past, little legends that define us and highlight what's important. And they're stories about our family present: This is why we do what we do, this is what's important to us.

In his new book, "The Secrets of Happy Families," and in his recent "This Life" column for the Sunday Styles section of The New York Times, "The Stories That Bind Us," my colleague and friend Bruce Feiler described the way telling family stories matters to our children. He brought up a recent study, in which psychologists asked children a battery of questions about their history, ranging from "Do you know where your grandparents grew up?" to "Do you know the story of your birth?" The conclusion:

The more children knew about their family's history, the stronger their sense of control over their lives, the higher their self-esteem and the more successfully they believed their families functioned. The "Do You Know?" scale turned out to be the best single predictor of children's emotional health and happiness.

That's dramatic. Is it any wonder that I've been trying to tell more family stories in the weeks since I read Bruce's book? Presumably, I'm not the only one -- his article stayed on the "Most E-Mailed" list for days. Telling family stories seems like both a simple and wonderful way to strengthen children and families, and one without a downside. What harm could there be in telling family stories?

Our problem is that some of our family stories are hard for one of our children to hear.

We adopted my youngest daughter from China when she was nearly 4. Before she lived with us, she lived happily with her foster parents there, and we are fortunate enough to know them and to know the details of her history. We know our experience of the day she joined our family, and we know what she has told us about what she experienced on that same day. Those are our family stories.

But while for three of our children, they're joyful stories worthy of constant retelling, for our youngest daughter, those are complex stories of loss and eventual gain; of leaving a family she did not want to leave and gaining a family she did not much want at the time. Her love for us now only makes it more complicated.

Other stories are hard for her to hear as well: the stories of our family history after she was born but before she was part of our family. And so many of the phrases that go with these stories -- the things that "run in our family" or the ways someone is "just like Grandpa" -- are loaded in adoptive families. We say them just the same, and distribute them equally (nurture counts).

We're far from the only family, or even the only "kind" of family, with difficult stories. Death, divorce, illness, remarriage, moving -- as our families evolve, our histories form, and that evolution can mean that even happy stories about something that will never be the same can be hard to share.

I'm thinking about adoption, and so I chose to consult Dr. Jane Aronson, one of the foremost practitioners of adoption medicine, who has advised thousands of adoptive families over the years. Aronson has been working on her book "Carried in Our Hearts" (available in April), a tribute to the families she has worked with over the years. Because the book includes dozens of first-person accounts from parents and children, Aronson has been thinking a lot about family stories of late, too. Here is her advice to me, summed up in a single phrase:

(Continued on page 2)

Were you interviewed for this story? If so, please fill out our accuracy form

Send question/comment to the editors




Further Discussion

Here at PressHerald.com we value our readers and are committed to growing our community by encouraging you to add to the discussion. To ensure conscientious dialogue we have implemented a strict no-bullying policy. To participate, you must follow our Terms of Use.

Questions about the article? Add them below and we’ll try to answer them or do a follow-up post as soon as we can. Technical problems? Email them to us with an exact description of the problem. Make sure to include:
  • Type of computer or mobile device your are using
  • Exact operating system and browser you are viewing the site on (TIP: You can easily determine your operating system here.)