November 11, 2012

Don't dam the ice or go full-steam on heat

Snow and more snow – it's bound to shake things up. Here's a list of chores to help you get your house ready for the really cold weather.

By Ray Routhier rrouthier@pressherald.com
Staff Writer

Winter's coming fast. Do you have your checklist ready?

click image to enlarge

Clogged gutters can lead to ice dams, moisture problems, leaks and slippery walkways in winter. To avoid these issues, clean them out before the snow flies – or hire someone else to do it.

Shutterstock.com

click image to enlarge

The Greater Portland Board of Realtors recommends preparing an emergency kit to keep on hand in winter. Such a kit might include candles and matches, blankets, bottled water, batteries, some non-perishable food and first-aid supplies.

Shutterstock.com

Additional Photos Below

Every homeowner should have one. There are so many necessary or helpful things to do to one's home in preparation for a long Maine winter that it's really hard to keep all the tasks straight without one.

If you want to make sure your furnace doesn't give out in January, it's a good idea to get a tune-up soon. If you don't want ice dams causing problems with your roof, clean gutters and check your ventilation now. If you use a fireplace or wood stove, clean those flues.

If you have an older home that isn't quite airtight, you'll want to caulk or seal around doors and windows, or put sheets of plastic over windows, to keep cold out and heat in.

Basically, depending on your house, there's a lot you can and should do now. That's why you need a list.

To get you started, we've compiled a checklist of the various areas you should be thinking about when getting ready for winter conditions.

HEAT THINGS UP

Schedule an annual service and tune-up for your boiler, furnace or water heater, says Curry Caputo, president of Sustainable Structures, a construction, renovation and energy auditing company in Hallowell. Caputo says that because heating appliances can sit for six months without use, rust can build up, and other problems can occur.

A full and thorough furnace/boiler service should include cleaning the heat exchanger; testing the flame sensor and combustion; cleaning the oil strainer, blower, blast tube and electrodes; replacing nozzle and oil filters; repairing oil leaks; and testing oil-pump pressure, adjusting the spinner or shutter for minimum smoke.

It's a good idea to get on a schedule for furnace maintenance so you know it's done annually. This usually costs $150 and up for most systems. Even if you can't have one done before the season – heating companies are pretty busy right now – schedule one for as soon as you can this winter.

CHIMNEY CHECK

Like with furnace servicing, it's good to have your fireplace chimney cleaned annually and to keep it on a regular schedule.

Local chimney sweep companies say you should have your chimney inspected annually to check for erosion of the liner and buildup of creosote in the flue. Creosote is created from the gasses given off by flames, and can be flammable. It only takes a fraction of an inch of buildup to create a problem. A chimney cleaning will usually cost less than a furnace tune-up.

Also, in Maine there are a lot of older homes with multiple fireplaces that are no longer in use. Caputo says it's important to seal those up. If there's an interior or exterior damper, close it. If there is no damper, use foam or some other temporary way of sealing the opening.

GUTTER TALK

Clogged gutters can lead to ice dams, moisture problems, leaks and slippery walkways in winter. So you've got to clean them. If you don't hire someone to do it, make sure you do it safely. Power lines, tree limbs and the height of your roof all combine to make gutter cleaning a potentially dangerous job.

Here are some safety tips on gutter cleaning from Maine Coast Construction in Camden:

Always have a spotter hold the ladder steady, and never stand on the top rung.

Set up your ladder 1 foot out from the house for every 4 feet of vertical rise. Extend the ladder 3 feet beyond your roof.

Don't use a metal ladder around anything electrical, including power lines, and don't place the ladder near doorways.

(Continued on page 2)

Were you interviewed for this story? If so, please fill out our accuracy form

Send question/comment to the editors


Additional Photos

click image to enlarge

Local chimney sweep companies advise homeowners to remember to schedule inspections annually.

Shutterstock.com

  


Further Discussion

Here at PressHerald.com we value our readers and are committed to growing our community by encouraging you to add to the discussion. To ensure conscientious dialogue we have implemented a strict no-bullying policy. To participate, you must follow our Terms of Use.

Questions about the article? Add them below and we’ll try to answer them or do a follow-up post as soon as we can. Technical problems? Email them to us with an exact description of the problem. Make sure to include:
  • Type of computer or mobile device your are using
  • Exact operating system and browser you are viewing the site on (TIP: You can easily determine your operating system here.)