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August 19, 2013

Five places to find really cool sculptures

Artfully rendered rock, metal and wood are big in Maine, and out there in public for all to enjoy.

By Bob Keyes bkeyes@pressherald.com
Staff Writer

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Jesse Salisbury’s “Tidal Moon” at the Jetport.

Gordon Chibroski/Staff Photographer

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“Garden Interlude” by Carole Whelan at the Art Gallery at the University of New England in Portland.

Gordon Chibroski/Staff Photographer

Additional Photos Below

Some are small and suitable for indoors. Others are large and intended for outdoor situations. Lately, Sawyer has been making spheres from material salvaged from the now-closed Brunswick Naval Air Station. He allows most of his work to take on its natural patina, and it blends nicely into the wooded environment.

Stewinder is open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. every Sunday and Monday through Oct. 10, and Sawyer also schedules monthly open studio tours. The next will be 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday.

Very likely, Sawyer will soon have a piece at the Portland International Jetport. The Portland Public Art Committee has signed off on a piece, and now it's a matter of getting final approval from the City Council. 

Stemwinder Sculpture Works & Gardens, 131 Camden Road (Route 90), Warren. Free admission. 273-3948; stemwindersculpture.com

SCULPTURE TRAIL OF MAINE, SCHOODIC AREA/DOWN EAST: For those headed Down East, the best sculpture in Maine -- hands down -- can be found along the Sculpture Trail of Maine, which features 27 sculptures sited from Bangor to Eastport. The pieces were made during the four Schoodic International Sculpture symposia, organized by Steuben artist Jesse Salisbury.

The next and last is scheduled for Prospect Harbor a year from now. Communities participating will be Surry, Lubec, Calais, Harrington, Jonesboro, Bucksport and Castine. Each of those towns will receive a sculpture created by an international artist, who will work on-site next summer with local rock.

The symposium began in 2007, and has continued every other year since, resulting in a growing stock of sculpture unique to Maine. These are large-scale pieces created by artists from across the globe.

The symposium amounts to an artist-in-residency program that gives sculptors the chance to focus on a single piece of public art. They work for six weeks to create a piece, which ends up in a sponsoring community.

The Down East trail is a big commitment. It covers 273 miles, but is worth the time and effort. Collectively, the trail represents the largest single public art collection in Maine. 

Sculpture Trail of Maine, with 27 stops from Bangor to Eastport. Free. schoodicsculpture.org

Staff Writer Bob Keyes can be reached at 791-6457 or:

bkeyes@pressherald.com

Twitter: pphbkeyes

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Additional Photos

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At the Art Gallery at the University of New England in Portland, “Spring (from the Cloud Series)” by Melita Westerlund.

Gordon Chibroski/Staff Photographer

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Wendy Klemperer’s porcupine at the Portland International Jetport.

Gordon Chibroski/Staff Photographer

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One of Wendy Klemperer’s deer at the Portland International Jetport.

Gordon Chibroski/Staff Photographer

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Jay Sawyer has dotted his property in Warren with the sculptures that he creates from salvaged materials, including “Samosphere IV: A Space for The Spirit."

Photos courtesy of the artist

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“Driftwood Loon” by Dan West at Coastal Maine Botanical Gardens in Boothbay.

Courtesy photo

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At Coastal Maine Botanical Gardens in Boothbay: “Oak Leaf” by John Bowdren.

Courtesy photo

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At Coastal Maine Botanical Gardens in Boothbay: “Royalty” by Melita Westerlund.

Courtesy photo

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At Coastal Maine Botanical Gardens in Boothbay: “Black Locust Bench with Robin” by Ray Carbone.

Courtesy photo

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Jay Sawyer has dotted his property in Warren with the sculptures that he creates from salvaged materials, including “Keebler Tree.”

Photos courtesy of the artist

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From the Sculpture Trail of Maine, works by Don Meserve in Winter Harbor.

Courtesy photo

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From the Sculpture Trail of Maine, works by Don Meserve, Lise Becu in Addison.

Courtesy photo

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