February 20, 2013

Some like it hot. Really hot. Really really really hot

By Noelle Carter / McClatchy Newspapers

(Continued from page 1)

Some like it hot. Really hot.
click image to enlarge

Red jalapeno chiles

Some like it hot. Really hot.
click image to enlarge

There is a world of possibilities for home cooks looking to unleash the pleasure-pain flame with their own hot sauces.

McClatchy Newspapers photos

Additional Photos Below

4. Remove the chiles from the soaking water (reserve the water) and place them in a blender. Add the garlic, cloves, oregano, cumin seeds and salt, along with the cider vinegar, 2 cups soaking water (taste the soaking water before using, and if it tastes bitter, use plain water) and the oil.

5. Puree the sauce until it is completely smooth, adding water as needed to thin. Taste the sauce – the flavors will vary with each batch of chiles – and adjust the flavorings and seasonings to taste (sweeten if desired with a little sugar).

6. Using a very fine mesh strainer or chinois, strain the sauce into a large heavy-bottomed saucepan. Whisk in additional water to thin as desired. Bring the sauce to a simmer and stir frequently for 3 to 5 minutes to marry the flavors, then remove from heat. Pour the sauce into a glass jar or bottle, cover and refrigerate.

Each tablespoon: 18 calories; 1 g protein; 2 g carbohydrates; 0 fiber; 1 g fat; 0 fat; 0 cholesterol; 0 sugar; 74 mg sodium.

CARIBBEAN JERK-STYLE HOT SAUCE

Total time: 30 minutes

Servings: Makes about 3 cups hot sauce.

Note: The sauce should be prepared in a well-ventilated area. Muscovado sugar can be found at most cooking and baking supply stores. Wear gloves while chopping the Scotch bonnet or habanero peppers because the heat in the oils can sting your hands. Wash your hands thoroughly after handling the peppers.

1½ teaspoons freshly ground black pepper

¾ teaspoon grated nutmeg

1½ teaspoons ground allspice

½ teaspoon ground cinnamon

¼ teaspoon ground cloves

2 tablespoons salt

¼ cup muscovado or dark brown sugar

6 to 9 Scotch bonnet or habanero peppers, stemmed and chopped

4 teaspoons minced garlic

1 tablespoon minced ginger

2 bunches scallions, chopped (green and white parts)

Zest and juice of 4 limes

¼ cup distilled white vinegar

¼ cup dark rum

¼ cup oil

½ to 1 cup water

1. In the bowl of a food processor, combine the pepper, nutmeg, allspice, cinnamon, cloves, salt, sugar, peppers, garlic, ginger, scallions, lime zest and juice, vinegar, rum and oil. Pulse a few times to form a coarse paste.

2. Transfer the mixture to a medium, heavy-bottomed saucepan and simmer for 3 to 5 minutes, stirring frequently, to marry the flavors.

3. Remove from heat. Place the mixture back in a food processor or blender and blend to form a smooth sauce, thinning as desired with one-half to 1 cup water. Strain if desired. To store, refrigerate the sauce in a covered glass bottle or jar.

Each tablespoon: 16 calories; 0 protein; 2 g carbohydrates; 0 fiber; 1 g fat; 0 saturated fat; 0 cholesterol; 1 g sugar; 195 mg sodium.

SRIRACHA-STYLE HOT SAUCE

Total time: 25 minutes

Servings: Makes about 1½ cups sauce

Note: This sauce should be prepared in a well-ventilated area and is best prepared at least 1 to 2 days before using. Cane vinegar and palm sugar can be found at select well-stocked cooking stores, as well as Asian markets.

1 pound mixed fresh red chiles (such as red Fresnos or jalapenos), stemmed and chopped

2 to 4 cloves garlic

¼ cup cane or rice vinegar

1½ teaspoons sea salt, more if desired

2 tablespoons palm or light brown sugar, more if desired

1. In the bowl of a food processor, pulse together the chiles, garlic, vinegar, salt and sugar to form a coarse paste.

2. Transfer the mixture to a non-reactive saucepan and simmer, stirring occasionally, until the aroma softens or mellows a bit, about 5 minutes. Remove from heat.

(Continued on page 3)

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Additional Photos

Some like it hot. Really hot.
click image to enlarge

Habanero chiles

Some like it hot. Really hot.
click image to enlarge

New Mexico chiles

Some like it hot. Really hot.
click image to enlarge

Ancho chiles



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