July 10, 2013

Boston bombing suspect makes first public appearance

The former college student appeared nonchalant, almost bored, during the hearing, only repeatedly speaking two words: 'Not guilty.'

The Associated Press

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This courtroom sketch depicts Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev during arraignment in federal court Wednesday, July 10, 2013 in Boston. The 19-year-old has been charged with using a weapon of mass destruction, and could face the death penalty. (AP Photo/Margaret Small)

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MIT police officers stand at attention outside the federal courthouse prior to arraignment for Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev on Wednesday in Boston. MIT officer Sean Collier was killed by the alleged suspects. The 19-year-old Tsarnaev has been charged with using a weapon of mass destruction, and could face the death penalty.

AP

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"There is a gap with information sharing at a higher level while there are still opportunities to intervene in the planning of these terrorist events," Commissioner Edward F. Davis III said.

Reporters and spectators began lining up for seats in the courtroom at 7:30 a.m. as a dozen Federal Protective Service officers and bomb-sniffing dogs surrounded the courthouse. Four hours before the 3:30 p.m. hearing, the defendant arrived at the courthouse in a four-vehicle motorcade.

About a dozen Tsarnaev supporters cheered as the motorcade arrived. The demonstrators yelled, "Justice for Jahar!" as Tsarnaev is known. One woman held a sign that said, "Free Jahar."

Lacey Buckley said she traveled from her home in Wenatchee, Wash., to attend the arraignment. She said she believes he is innocent. "I just think so many of his rights were violated. They almost murdered an unarmed kid in a boat," she said.

A group of friends who were on the high school wrestling team with Tsarnaev at Cambridge Rindge and Latin waited in line for hours, hoping to get a seat.

One of them, Hank Alvarez, said Tsarnaev was calm, peaceful and apolitical in high school.

"Just knowing him, it's hard for me to face the fact that he did it," said Alvarez, 19, of Cambridge.

Prosecutors say Tsarnaev, a Muslim, wrote about his motivations for the bombing on the inside walls and beams of the boat. He scrawled that the U.S. government was "killing our innocent civilians," and also wrote: "We Muslims are one body, you hurt one you hurt us all."

Martin Richard, 8, Krystle Marie Campbell, 29, and Lingzi Lu, 23, were killed by the two bombs, which were fashioned out of pressure cookers, gunpowder, nails and other shrapnel. Numerous victims lost legs.

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Photo provided by the Federal Bureau of Investigation shows Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev.

AP

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Tsarnaev family members and others depart the federal courthouse in Boston following the arraignment of Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev Wednesday, July 10, 2013, in Boston. The April 15 attack killed three and wounded more than 260. The 19-year-old Tsarnaev has been charged with using a weapon of mass destruction. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)

 


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