September 23, 2013

And the winners are ...

Jeff Daniels and Claire Danes are the best actor and actress, respectively, as Emmy Awards are bestowed Sunday in Los Angeles.

The Associated Press

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Steven Levitan, foreground, and the cast and crew of "Modern Family" accept the award for outstanding comedy series at the 65th Primetime Emmy Awards at Nokia Theatre on Sunday.

The Associated Press

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Anna Gunn, center, stands to accept the award for outstanding supporting actress in a drama series for her role on "Breaking Bad" at the 65th Primetime Emmy Awards at Nokia Theatre on Sunday in Los Angeles.

The Associated Press

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THE LIST OF EMMY WINNERS

The Associated Press

List of winners at Sunday's 65th annual Primetime Emmy Awards presented by the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences:

  • Drama Series: "Breaking Bad," AMC.
  • Actor, Drama Series: Jeff Daniels, "The Newsroom," HBO.
  • Actress, Drama Series: Claire Danes, "Homeland," Showtime.
  • Supporting Actor, Drama Series: Bobby Cannavale, "Boardwalk Empire," HBO.
  • Supporting Actress, Drama Series: Anna Gunn, "Breaking Bad," AMC.
  • Directing, Drama Series: David Fincher, "House of Cards," Netflix.
  • Writing, Drama Series: Henry Bromell, "Homeland," Showtime.
  • Comedy Series: "Modern Family," ABC.
  • Actor, Comedy Series: Jim Parsons, "The Big Bang Theory," CBS.
  • Actress, Comedy Series: Julia Louis-Dreyfus, "Veep," HBO.
  • Supporting Actor, Comedy Series: Tony Hale, "Veep," HBO.
  • Supporting Actress, Comedy Series: Merritt Wever, "Nurse Jackie," Showtime.
  • Directing, Comedy Series: Gail Mancuso, "Modern Family," ABC.
  • Writing, Comedy Series: Tina Fey, Tracey Wigfield, "30 Rock," NBC.
  • Miniseries or Movie: "Behind the Candelabra," HBO.
  • Actor, Miniseries or Movie: Michael Douglas, "Behind the Candelabra," HBO.
  • Actress, Miniseries or Movie: Laura Linney, "The Big C: Hereafter," Showtime.
  • Supporting Actor, Miniseries or Movie: James Cromwell, "American Horror Story: Asylum," FX Networks.
  • Supporting Actress, Miniseries or Movie: Ellen Burstyn, "Political Animals," USA.
  • Directing, Miniseries or Movie: Steven Soderbergh, "Behind the Candelabra," HBO.
  • Writing, Miniseries or Movie: Abi Morgan, "The Hour," BBC America.
  • Reality-Competition Program: "The Voice," NBC.
  • Variety Series: "The Colbert Report," Comedy Central.
  • Writing, Variety Series: "The Colbert Report," Comedy Central.
  • Directing, Variety Series: Don Roy King, "Saturday Night Live," NBC.
  • Choreography: Derek Hough, "Dancing With the Stars," ABC.

Derek Hough of "Dancing with the Stars" won the trophy for best choreography, which offered an opportunity to include an upbeat dance number late in the show.

In the variety show category, "The Colbert Report" broke a 10-year winning streak held by "The Daily Show with Jon Stewart." It also won for best writing for a variety show.

The ceremony's first hour was relatively somber, with memorial tributes and a doleful song by Elton John in honor of the late musical star Liberace, the subject of the nominated biopic "Behind the Candelabra."

"Liberace left us 25 years ago and what a difference those years have made to people like me," said John, who is openly gay in contrast to the closeted Liberace portrayed in the TV movie.

Robin Williams offered another tribute. "Jonathan Winters was my mentor," Williams said of the actor-comedian. "I told him that and he said, 'Please, I prefer 'idol.'"

Also honored was Cory Monteith, the "Glee" star who died at age 31 in July of a drug and alcohol overdose. "His death is a tragic reminder of the rapacious, senseless destruction that is brought on by addiction," said his co-star Jane Lynch.

The inclusion of Monteith as one of five extended goodbyes despite his abbreviated career and the exclusion of such enduring stars as Jack Klugman and Larry Hagman drew criticism from some. Adam Klugman, son of "The Odd Couple" actor, called his father's omission "criminal."

Edie Falco recalled her late "The Sopranos" co-star James Gandolfini, saluting him for his "fierce loyalty" to his friends and family and his work with military veterans.

"You all knew Jim the actor. I was lucky enough to know Jim the man," she said.

Harris started out the ceremony with help — and harassment — from past hosts including Jimmy Kimmel, Lynch and Conan O'Brien. When they started to squabble, nominee Kevin Spacey of the online show "House of Cards" got a close-up.

"It's all going according to my plan. I was promised the hosting job this year and they turned me down," Spacey said, channeling the scheming politician he plays on the digital series.

Diahann Carroll, the first African-American Emmy nominee in 1963 for "Naked City," created one of the night's most heartfelt moments when she took the stage with Washington and noted the importance of diversity in the industry and Emmys.

"Tonight, she better get this award," Carroll said of Washington, who covered her eyes in embarrassment. Danes' victory denied Washington.

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