July 3, 2013

Augusta child pornographer gets 40 years

'It is hard for me to find words to describe your conduct in this case because your conduct is simply unspeakable,' Judge John Woodcock Jr. tells Wade Hoover.

By BETTY ADAMS Kennebec Journal

BANGOR — A martial-arts instructor from Augusta will spend 40 years in federal prison for producing and possessing child pornography, some of it showing him abusing two boys.

click image to enlarge

Wade Robert Hoover

Staff photo by Andy Molloy

"I'm pretty much damned in this world and the next. I want to say I'm sorry, but I don't think that word is going to show how really sorry I am. They have the right to hate me. I hate myself. I'm not going to ask for forgiveness. I don't deserve it."

— Wade Hoover, at his sentencing hearing in U.S. District Court in Bangor on Tuesday

Wade Robert Hoover, 35, will also spend the remainder of his life under supervision by federal authorities.

The sentence was imposed Tuesday by U.S. District Court Judge John A. Woodcock Jr. who said Hoover's conduct was masochistic and sadistic and included violence.

"It is hard for me to find words to describe your conduct in this case because your conduct is simply unspeakable," Woodcock said. "You have not merely violated the law, you violated the most basic moral code in society. You preyed upon young boys when they were vulnerable."

Woodcock said he concluded that Hoover set up his martial arts business to gain access to victims, won their trust and that of their parents, and that he drugged the victims in order to rape them and took his time videotaping it so he could watch it repeatedly.

"It was the court's sad duty to view that video," Woodcock told Hoover. "When Congress passed laws to protect children against sexual predators, Congress had some just like you in mind."

The judge said one victim's letter to the court said Hoover "took away my dignity and respect. I am ashamed of what he did to me."

The mothers of both boys asked for Hoover to get the maximum 40-year sentence so he can never threaten a child's innocence again.

"This was not a stranger who did this to my child, it was a friend," one of the women said. "My son and I trusted him." She said the results of Hoover's abuse were devastating to her family.

The other mother turned to face Hoover, telling him, "You should be stripped of the title of veteran like you stripped our son of his innocence for your own needs."

At the end of the hearing, Woodcock spoke directly to the families of the victims, commending them for their courage in coming forward.

"I hope the process has been both cathartic and healing," he said, and they nodded in agreement. "The image that sticks in my head is of rambunctious, spirited young men. I hope for your purposes that side of these boys will shine through. I am confident it will."

More than 30 spectators, including investigators and one young boy, as well as Kennebec/Somerset County District Attorney Maeghan Maloney, watched the hearing.

Three of the spectators sat directly behind Hoover and spoke briefly with him after he entered the courtroom in handcuffs.

Hoover, wearing an orange jail uniform, sat at a table with his attorney, Virginia Villa. He continually wiped his eyes with tissues and frequently held his head in his hands.

"I'm pretty much damned in this world and the next," Hoover told the judge after the attorneys presented their arguments. "I want to say I'm sorry, but I don't think that word is going to show how really sorry I am. They have the right to hate me. I hate myself. I'm not going to ask for forgiveness. I don't deserve it."

The prosecutor, Assistant U.S. Attorney F. Todd Lowell, told the judge in a sentencing memo filed previously. "The abuse is horrible and the images of the abuse are chilling."

Lowell had asked that Hoover spend close to 40 years in prison for his crimes followed by a lifetime of supervised release.

Villa, assistant federal defender, suggested a sentence of 20 years, closer to the 15-year minimum.

"The most notable factor in this case is that the victims ... have no memory of the abuse," she wrote in her sentencing memo. "There is no indication they suffered bodily injury. They do not have to face a future in which the images of their abuse will be publicly traded, as Mr. Hoover never distributed the images he produced.

(Continued on page 2)

Were you interviewed for this story? If so, please fill out our accuracy form

Send question/comment to the editors




Further Discussion

Here at PressHerald.com we value our readers and are committed to growing our community by encouraging you to add to the discussion. To ensure conscientious dialogue we have implemented a strict no-bullying policy. To participate, you must follow our Terms of Use.

Questions about the article? Add them below and we’ll try to answer them or do a follow-up post as soon as we can. Technical problems? Email them to us with an exact description of the problem. Make sure to include:
  • Type of computer or mobile device your are using
  • Exact operating system and browser you are viewing the site on (TIP: You can easily determine your operating system here.)