April 17, 2013

Chinese marathon victim remembered as bright, 'bubbly'

The Associated Press

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This undated photo provided by Meixu Lu shows Lingzi Lu in Boston. Boston University confirmed Wednesday, April 17, 2013, that Lingzi Lu, who was studying mathematics and statistics at the school and was due to receive her graduate degree in 2015, was among the people killed in the explosions at the finish line of the Boston Marathon Monday, April 15, 2013, in Boston. (AP Photo/Meixu Lu)

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A woman reflects in front of a makeshift memorial honoring Boston University student Lingzi Lu, who was killed in the Boston Marathon explosions, Wednesday, April 17, 2013, in Boston. The city continues to cope following Monday's explosions near the finish line of the marathon, which claimed three lives. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

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FOR MORE COVERAGE, visit our special section on the Boston bombings.

Chinese state media said Lu was from the northeastern city of Shenyang.

News of her death drew an outpouring of condolences on Chinese-language blogs, with her Sina Weibo account drawing nearly 25,000 comments as of early Thursday. Her former neighbor in Shenyang, Zhang Xinbo, lamented how the news brought home the tragedy of what he considered a faraway event.

"I saw her grow up, and a few scenes from the past are flashing through my mind. Now, she's becoming a girl, a bit Westernized, but a loud bang has changed everything," he wrote in a blog. "I think of her loved ones, and I don't know how they are coping with this painful news, while still searching for any thread of hope."

Many comments reflect a growing awareness that the burgeoning number of Chinese students and elsewhere in recent years has opened them up to dangers ranging from mundane street crime to terrorist attacks.

"Nearly 12 years after Sept. 11, more and more people have realized terrorists are the global enemy. They not only attack Americans but also Chinese, regardless of nationality or race," the well-known blogger and author Li Chengpeng wrote.

 

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