August 16, 2013

Bert Lance, Georgia banker and Carter ally, dies at 82

The self-described 'country banker' was Jimmy Carter's first budget director and closest personal friends.

The Associated Press

CALHOUN, Ga. — Bert Lance, a Georgia banker and ally of former President Jimmy Carter who served as his first budget director before departing amid a high-profile investigation of his banking activities, died on Thursday evening. He was 82.

click image to enlarge

In this Aug. 18, 1977, photo, President Jimmy Carter tells reporters that his confidence in Bert Lance, left, were reconfirmed by a report of federal investigators that found nothing warranting prosecution in his Georgian banking activities.

AP

Lance died at home in northwest Georgia, Gordon County deputy coroner Heath Derryberry said. He said Lance had struggled recently with unspecified health problems, though authorities were unsure of his cause of death.

In a statement, Carter said Lance was one of his closest personal friends and that he was a dependable source of advice on intricate state and national issues.

"Bert Lance was one of the most competent and dedicated public servants I have ever known," Carter said. "As head of the Department of Transportation in Georgia, he was acknowledged by all the other cabinet level officials as their natural leader, and he quickly acquired the same status in Washington as our nation's Director of the Office of Management and Budget."

Carter went on to say that Lance's "never failing sense of humor and ability to make thousands of friends were just two of the sterling qualities that made knowing Bert such a valuable part of our lives."

Lance, a bear of a man with thick black hair, a rubbery neck and a distinctive drawl, was a self-described "country banker" who had served as state highway commissioner from 1971 to 1973, when Carter was Georgia governor, and also headed the National Bank of Georgia.

He was widely associated with the phrase, "If it ain't broke, don't fix it."

Lance became a protege of Carter's, and unsuccessfully ran for Georgia governor himself in 1974, as Carter set his sights on The White House. Two years later, Lance was part of the circle of Georgians who followed Carter to Washington after his election as president.

Lance served as the Carter administration's first OMB director, where he advocated zero-based budgeting. But his career was derailed by what became known as "Lancegate." He was accused of misappropriating bank money to friends and relatives, leading to a wide-ranging investigation that became a major distraction for the new Democratic administration, especially after Carter had campaigned on moving past the corruption of the Watergate years.

Carter accepted Lance's resignation in September, 1977, though they remained close friends.

Lance went on trial in 1980 for charges arising from a federal investigation, including conspiracy, misuse of bank funds, false statements to banks and false entries in bank records. He was acquitted of nine charges of bank fraud after a 16-week trial in Atlanta. A federal jury was unable to render verdicts on three other charges and the case ended in a mistrial. The charges were later dismissed.

Among the defense witnesses were Lillian Carter, the then-president's mother, and the Rev. Martin Luther King, Sr., father of the slain civil rights leader. Lance said later that he wasn't bitter.

Thomas Bertram Lance was born in Gainesville, Ga., in June, 1931, according to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution (http://bit.ly/13oARnu ). His family moved to Calhoun, Ga., where he met his future wife, LaBelle David. The two were married for 63 years and had four sons, one of whom died in 2006.

Lance attended Emory University and the University of Georgia, but dropped out of college just before graduation to support his wife and son as a teller at Calhoun First National Bank and eventually became the bank's president, according to the New Georgia Encyclopedia.

(Continued on page 2)

Were you interviewed for this story? If so, please fill out our accuracy form

Send question/comment to the editors




Further Discussion

Here at PressHerald.com we value our readers and are committed to growing our community by encouraging you to add to the discussion. To ensure conscientious dialogue we have implemented a strict no-bullying policy. To participate, you must follow our Terms of Use.

Questions about the article? Add them below and we’ll try to answer them or do a follow-up post as soon as we can. Technical problems? Email them to us with an exact description of the problem. Make sure to include:
  • Type of computer or mobile device your are using
  • Exact operating system and browser you are viewing the site on (TIP: You can easily determine your operating system here.)