August 12, 2013

'Whitey' Bulger guilty of 11 killings, other gangland crimes

The former Boston crime boss, who is 83 and faces life in prison, shows no emotion upon hearing the verdicts.

By Denise Lavoie and Jay Lindsay / The Associated Press

(Continued from page 1)

James "Whitey" Bulger

The Associated Press

click image to enlarge

This composite shows police mug shots of James "Whitey" Bulger in 1953, above, and in 1984.

Associated Press File Photos

Related headlines

Prosecutors at the two-month trial portrayed Bulger as a cold-blooded, hands-on boss who killed anyone he saw as a threat, along with innocent people who happened to get in the way. Then, according to testimony, he would go off and take a nap while his underlings cleaned up.

Among other things, Bulger was accused of strangling two women with his bare hands, shooting two men in the head after chaining them to chairs and interrogating them for hours, and opening fire on two men as they left a South Boston restaurant.

Bulger skipped town in 1994 after being tipped off – by a retired FBI agent, John Connolly, it turned out – that he was about to be indicted.

He spent 16 years on the run and was on the FBI's 10 Most Wanted list before he was finally captured in 2011 in Santa Monica, Calif., where he had been living in a rent-controlled apartment near the beach with his longtime girlfriend, Catherine Greig. She was sentenced to eight years in prison for helping Bulger.

His disappearance proved a major embarrassment to the FBI when it came out at court hearings and trials that Bulger had been an informant from 1975 to 1990, feeding the bureau information on the rival New England Mafia and members of his own gang while he continued to kill and intimidate.

Those proceedings also revealed that Bulger and his gang paid off several FBI agents and state and Boston police officers, dispensing Christmas envelopes of cash and cases of fine wine to get information on search warrants, wiretaps and investigations and stay one step ahead of the law.

At his trial, Bulger's lawyers tried to turn the tables on the government, detailing the corruption and accusing prosecutors of offering unconscionably generous deals to three former Bulger loyalists to testify against him.

The defense portrayed the three key witnesses – gangster Stephen The Rifleman" Flemmi, hit man John Martorano and Bulger protege Kevin Weeks – as pathological liars who pinned their own crimes on Bulger so they could get reduced sentences.

But overall, the defense barely contested many of the charges against Bulger. In fact, his lawyers conceded he ran a criminal enterprise that took in millions through drugs, gambling and loansharking.

His lawyers did strongly deny he killed women, something Bulger evidently regarded as a violation of his underworld code of honor. The jury ultimately found he had a role in the strangling of one woman – Flemmi's stepdaughter – but it could not reach a decision on the other woman, Flemmi's girlfriend.

Prosecutors said the women were killed because they knew too much about the gang's business.

The defense also spent a surprising amount of time disputing he was a "rat" – a label that seemed to set off the hotheaded Bulger more than anything else, causing him to erupt in obscenities in the courtroom.

Bulger's lawyers argued that Connolly, Bulger's supposed handler inside the FBI, fabricated Bulger's thick informant file to cover up his corrupt relationship with the gangster and advance his own career.

The prosecution's witnesses also included drug dealers, bookmakers and legitimate businessmen who described terrifying encounters with Bulger in which he ordered them to pay up or take a beating or worse.

Real estate developer Richard Buccheri said Bulger threatened to kill him and his family if he did not pay $200,000. Buccheri related how Bulger slammed his hand on a table in anger.

"With that, he takes the shotgun that was on the table – he sticks it in my mouth," Buccheri said as spectators in the courtroom gasped.

Before the trial, Bulger's lawyers said he would take the stand and detail graft inside the FBI. But after Judge Denise Casper disallowed his claim of immunity, Bulger did not testify.

"As far as I'm concerned, I didn't get a fair trial, and this is a sham, and do what youse want with me," he complained to the judge as the trial wound down. "That's it. That's my final word."

Bulger's life story fascinated Bostonians for decades. He grew up in a South Boston housing project and quickly became involved in crime, while his brother William rose to become one of the most powerful politicians in Massachusetts as state Senate president.

William Bulger was forced to resign as president of the University of Massachusetts system in 2003 after it was learned that he got a call from his brother while he was on the run and didn't urge him to surrender.

In court papers last week, Whitey Bulger offered to forfeit the guns and $822,000 in cash that officials found in his California apartment, but he wanted to keep one thing: a Stanley Cup ring that he said was a gift from someone.

Were you interviewed for this story? If so, please fill out our accuracy form

Send question/comment to the editors




Further Discussion

Here at PressHerald.com we value our readers and are committed to growing our community by encouraging you to add to the discussion. To ensure conscientious dialogue we have implemented a strict no-bullying policy. To participate, you must follow our Terms of Use.

Questions about the article? Add them below and we’ll try to answer them or do a follow-up post as soon as we can. Technical problems? Email them to us with an exact description of the problem. Make sure to include:
  • Type of computer or mobile device your are using
  • Exact operating system and browser you are viewing the site on (TIP: You can easily determine your operating system here.)