November 19, 2013

Boston Marathon invites back those affected by bombs

Each must make his or her case in a 250-word essay.

The Associated Press

BOSTON — Those who were “personally and profoundly impacted” by the explosions at the Boston Marathon finish line will be able to run in next year’s race under a special invitation that event organizers extended Monday to those “with a special connection to the events of April 15.”

click image to enlarge

Evidence collectors scour the scene of the Boston Marathon bombings after this year's race. People who convince a committee they were “personally and profoundly impacted” by the explosions at the Boston Marathon finish line will be able to run in next year’s race under a special invitation that event organizers extended Monday to those “with a special connection to the events of April 15.”

AP File Photo

Having already expanded the field by 9,000 to accommodate those who were stopped on the course when two bombs went off at the finish line, as well as those who want to run the first race after the bombings, the Boston Athletic Association said it has set aside up to a few hundred additional entries for those who can make their case in a 250-word essay submitted to the organization’s website.

“We are making additional entries available by request to those who were personally and profoundly impacted,” the athletic association's executive director, Tom Grilk, said.

Grilk said this is in addition to a special allocation of entries for The One Fund, the charity established to help the bombing victims, and for first-responders and for Boston-area hospitals where the wounded were treated. Nor is it specifically for athletes with disabilities, including those wounded in the explosions; a separate process is designed for them.

Those who would like to apply need to make their case in 250 words or fewer and submit it to the association's website, www.baa.org, by Nov. 27. A committee appointed by the association will judge the entries and notify those who were successful on Dec. 4.

Those entering must be 18 years old on race day and be prepared to show they can complete the 26.2-mile distance in less than 6 hours, 30 minutes.

Three people were killed and at least 260 wounded when two bombs exploded on Boylston Street during this year’s race.

An expanded field of 36,000 – the second-biggest in the race’s 118-year history – is expected to line up on April 21 for the run from Hopkinton to Boston’s Back Bay.

Were you interviewed for this story? If so, please fill out our accuracy form

Send question/comment to the editors




Further Discussion

Here at PressHerald.com we value our readers and are committed to growing our community by encouraging you to add to the discussion. To ensure conscientious dialogue we have implemented a strict no-bullying policy. To participate, you must follow our Terms of Use.

Questions about the article? Add them below and we’ll try to answer them or do a follow-up post as soon as we can. Technical problems? Email them to us with an exact description of the problem. Make sure to include:
  • Type of computer or mobile device your are using
  • Exact operating system and browser you are viewing the site on (TIP: You can easily determine your operating system here.)