May 8, 2013

Father of suspect in Boston conspiracy case: 'He is not a terrorist'

Bridget Murphy / The Associated Press

(Continued from page 1)

Volunteer Kevin Brown, of Boston, right, places a Teddy bear at a makeshift memorial near the Boston Marathon finish line in Boston's Copley Square on Tuesday in remembrance of the marathon bombing victims.

AP

Authorities initially charged Tazhayakov and Kadyrbayev with violating the terms of their student visas while attending UMass Dartmouth.

Immigration officials said Tuesday that they have temporarily suspended the immigration court proceedings against the two men, but will continue the immigration removal process after their criminal cases are resolved.

The FBI has alleged that on April 18, just hours after surveillance camera photos of the Tsarnaev brothers were made public, the three students went to Dzhokhar Tsarnaev's dorm room and removed his backpack and laptop computer.

Authorities said one of them later threw the backpack in the garbage, and it wound up in a landfill, where it was discovered by law enforcement officers. In the backpack were fireworks that had been emptied of their gunpowder.

Bukh said the criminal complaint alleges it was Kadyrbayev, and not his client, who threw away the backpack with the fireworks.

Ismagulov said his son told him he never intended to help Tsarnaev hide evidence. He also said Tazhayakov wasn't sure if Tsarnaev was one of the suspects in the photos that were released because those images weren't high quality.

"He would never intend to do anything bad to people in the United States," Ismagulov said of his son.

He said he has left flowers at the memorial site because his son asked him "to express condolences to innocent people who were hurt and killed."

— In other developments, the administrator of the One Fund Boston charity said potential recipients should have low expectations because the $28 million fund won't pay out nearly enough to fully compensate the families of those who died or who suffered injuries.

Attorney Kenneth Feinberg said at a public meeting Tuesday in Boston that his draft plan for distributing the money reserves the highest payments for the families of those killed at the marathon and for the relatives of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology police officer who authorities say the bombing suspects killed.

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