January 17, 2013

Dartmouth ending Advanced Placement credit

The Associated Press

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"This is not an effort to make it more difficult for students to graduate early," Tell said.

A spokeswoman for the College Board, which runs the AP program, declined to comment specifically on Dartmouth's decision because the college has not notified the company of its policy changes.

But Deborah Davis said the company's research indicates that most students who enroll in small, highly selective colleges use AP scores for placement, not to graduate early. But with the average time to complete a bachelor's degree increasing to six years at most colleges, she anticipates that AP exam scores will increasingly be used to provide credits.

Dartmouth officials weren't able to point to other colleges that have eliminated credit for AP exams, though some have tightened their policies over the years. Davis said each year, between 1 and 3 percent of colleges and universities change their policies, with a balance between those who allow more credit and those who allow less.

Policies vary at other Ivy League schools. At Princeton, AP tests scores can help students become eligible for "advanced standing," and earn credit equivalent up to a full year. But no more than five students have taken advantage of that option in recent years, a spokesman said, and there are no plans to change the policy.

Columbia plans to review its policies this year, but for now, allows students to earn up to 16 points through AP tests. But very few use that credit to graduate early, said Dean of Advising Monique Rinere. Similarly, Harvard College currently offers students the opportunity to use test scores to satisfy the language requirement and sometimes to place into higher level courses, but only a small fraction ultimately graduate early.

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