October 28, 2013

Military bases open their doors to homeschoolers

Military families move on average nearly every three years. The transition can be tough for children, and homeschooling can make it easier, advocates say.

By Kimberly Hefling
The Associated Press

ANDREWS AIR FORCE BASE, Md. — A growing number of military parents want to end the age-old tradition of switching schools for their kids.

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In this photo taken Oct. 9, 2013, Grace Whittaker, left, and Andria Kirkendall, right, learn sign language during a lesson at a homeschooling co-operative at Andrews Air Force Base Md. A growing number of military parents have embraced homeschooling, seeking to put an end to the age-old tradition for military kids of switching schools.

The Associated Press

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Channing Morgan, from left, Brooklyn Olds, and Grace Whittaker learn sign language during a lesson at a homeschooling co-operative at Andrews Air Force Base, Md.

The Associated Press

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They’ve embraced homeschooling, and are finding support on bases, which are providing resources for families and opening their doors for home schooling cooperatives and other events.

“If there’s a military installation, there’s very likely homeschoolers there if you look,” said Nicole McGhee, 31, of Cameron, N.C., a mother of three with a husband stationed at North Carolina’s Fort Bragg who runs a Facebook site on military homeschooling.

At Marine Corps Base Quantico in Virginia, the library sported special presentations for homeschoolers on Benjamin Franklin and static electricity. Fort Bragg offers daytime taekwondo classes. At Fort Belvoir, Va., there are athletic events and a parent-led chemistry lab.

At Andrews Air Force Base about 15 miles outside of Washington, more than 40 families participate on Wednesdays in a home schooling cooperative at the base’s youth center. Earlier this month, teenagers in one room warmed up for a mock audition reciting sayings such as “red leather, yellow leather.” Younger kids downstairs learned to sign words such as “play” and searched for “Special Agent Stan” during a math game. Military moms taught each class.

There are also events outside the co-op, such as a planned camping trip for kids reading Jean Craighead’s “My Side of the Mountain.”

“Some weeks I wonder how my kids are going to do the school side of school because they are so busy socializing,” said Joanna Hemp, the co-op’s welcome coordinator.

Military families move on average nearly every three years. The transition can be tough for children, and homeschooling can make it easier, advocates say. The children don’t have to adjust to a new teacher or worry that they’re behind because the new school’s curriculum is different.

Some military families also cite the same reasons for choosing homeschooling as those in the civilian population: a desire to educate their kids in a religious environment, concern about the school environment, or to provide for a child with special needs.

Two 16-year-olds, Andrew Roberts and Christina Cagle, interviewed at the Andrews co-op say they are happy their parents made the decision to homeschool them. Roberts said he thinks he gets a lot more done in a school day than peers in a traditional school, and he sees his friends plenty at Bible study groups and during other social events with other teenagers on base.

“There’s not like a lot of peer pressure considering you’re mostly with your siblings and it’s kind of a relaxed environment,” Cagle said.

Participating military families say there’s an added bonus to homeschooling. It allows them to schedule school time around the rigorous deployment, training and school schedules of the military member.

“We can take time off when dad is home and work harder when he is gone so we have that flexibility,” McGhee said.

Sharon Moore, the education liaison at Andrews who helps parents with school-related matters, said at the height of the summer military moving season, she typically gets about 20 calls from families moving to the base with homeschooling questions. She links them with families from the co-op and includes the homeschooled children during back-to-school events and other functions such as a trip to a planetarium.

“It comes down to they are military children and we love our military children,” said Moore, a former schoolteacher. “We recognize that they have unique needs that sometimes other children don’t have, and we want to make sure that we do our best to serve them and meet those needs because they have given so much to this country.”

(Continued on page 2)

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Additional Photos

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Josh Gillespie, 8, high-fives parent helper Shannon Morgan, right, after they solved a math problem during a lesson at the Andrews Air Force Base, Md., homeschooling cooperative with a math class teacher Jennifer Whittaker, center.

The Associated Press

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Tommy Henp, 5, left, and Preston Kirkendall, 5, learn sign language during a lesson at a homeschooling co-operative at Andrews Air Force Base, Md.

The Associated Press

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Melanie Cagle, 14, reads a monologue during an acting class at a homeschooling co-operative at Andrews Air Force Base, Md.

The Associated Press



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