November 1, 2012

Local & State Dispatches

Two Scarborough women charged with trafficking, possession of crack cocaine / Feds nearing settlement in Maine submarine arson case / Injury to Arabian horse proves to be bullet wounds ... and more news from around the state.

From staff and news services

SCARBOROUGH

Two women charged with trafficking, possession

Scarborough police, working in conjunction with Old Orchard Beach police, have arrested two women on drug trafficking and possession charges.

Tania Margate, 39, of Old Orchard Beach, and Star-Asia Kelley, 23, of Brooklyn, N.Y., were taken into police custody at a Scarborough gas station on Tuesday.

Prior to arresting the women, police searched a Scarborough motel room where Kelley had been staying.

Police said they found 12 grams of crack cocaine packaged for sale. The cocaine is estimated to have a street value of $2,000. Police officers also found 5 grams of heroin with a street value of $5,000 and more than $2,000 cash in the motel room.

Kelley was being held at the Cumberland County Jail on Wednesday night on a Class B felony charge of trafficking a schedule W drug. Her bail was set at $10,000 cash.

Margate made bail Wednesday after being charged with unlawful possession of a Schedule W drug (crack cocaine), operating after suspension and failure to appear in court based on an outstanding warrant.

PORTLAND

Auburn man in court to face stabbing charges

An Auburn man accused of stabbing a woman multiple times last month made his first court appearance in the case Wednesday.

Jamie Mondragon, 31, is charged with two counts of aggravated assault and one count of reckless conduct in the incident Sept. 30. He was not required to enter pleas during the proceeding in Cumberland County Unified Criminal Court.

Mondragon allegedly stabbed a 25-year-old woman repeatedly in an apartment in Brunswick. Three children were in the apartment at the time.

The woman's injuries were not life-threatening.

The U.S. Marshals Service arrested Mondragon in Fresno, Calif., two weeks later and he was extradited to Maine. 

Feds nearing settlement in submarine arson case

Federal prosecutors have submitted a "substantive proposal" to the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard worker accused of setting fire to a nuclear submarine, according to a court document.

Casey James Fury, of Portsmouth, N.H., is charged with two counts of arson in the May 23 and June 16 fires at the shipyard. The May 23 fire caused an estimated $400 million worth of damage to the USS Miami, which was at the Kittery shipyard for a 20-month overhaul.

Federal Defender David Beneman wrote in the document that significant progress has been made in discussions about reaching a resolution to the case without an indictment. 

Cruise ship season ends with bit of 'Brilliance'

Maine's cruise ship season has come to an end.

The 962-foot Brilliance of the Seas arrived in Portland on Wednesday morning with about 2,400 passengers and 850 crew members. It departed for New York City on Wednesday evening.

The Royal Caribbean Lines vessel was the final cruise ship of the season scheduled to stop in Maine this year.

Two ships that were expected to make port calls in Bar Harbor on Wednesday canceled their plans because of Superstorm Sandy.

BRUNSWICK

Injury to Arabian horse proves to be bullet wounds

Brunswick police are trying to determine who shot and injured an Arabian horse with a small-caliber firearm on Coombs Road.

The owner of Flash, a 20-year-old brown horse, told police that the animal was fine Saturday but was bleeding Sunday.

It was not immediately clear what was wrong with the animal, said Deputy Chief Marc Hagan.

But when a veterinarian examined the horse Tuesday, it turned out there were three wounds. Two bullets hit the horse on the top of the head, breaking the skin but not embedding in the animal, Hagen said. A third shot punctured the horse's side.

The veterinarian opted to leave the bullet, saying it would be more dangerous to remove it, Hagen said. The incident is probably not related to hunting because most hunters do not use small-caliber firearms, Hagen said.

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